How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

156 results for

Testicular Self-Exam

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

41. AGA Clinical Practice Update on Young Adult Onset Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis and Management: Expert Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

: 288-298 Autosomal dominant Colorectal Breast Thyroid Endometrial Lung Renal 16–20 30–50% (Female) 5–10 5–20 12 2–8 Colonoscopy every 1–3 y Age 18 y: Self-exam annually Age 25 y: Clinical exam every 6 months Age 30 y: Mammogram and breast MRI annually Age 18 y: Baseline then annually Annual endometrial biopsy for premenopausal women Annual endometrial ultrasound for postmenopausal women Urinalysis annually Urine cytology and renal ultrasound if family history of renal cancer annually Consider (...) disease recurrence. Colorectal Dis. 2009; 11 : 601-608 Autosomal dominant Breast Colorectal Pancreas Stomach Ovary Uterine/cervix Lung Small bowel Testicular 54 39 11–36 29 21 13 15 9–10 <1 Age 25 y: Mammogram and breast MRI yearly Late teens Colonoscopy every 2– y Age 25–30 y: MRCP or EUS every 1–2 y Late teens Upper endoscopy every 2–3 y Age 18 y: Annual transvaginal ultrasound Age 20 y: Annual chest CT Age 8–10 y: Small bowel screening (CT/MR enterography, small bowel follow-through, capsule

2020 American Gastroenterological Association Institute

42. Paediatric Urology

: 44. 45. Kaefer, M., et al. The incidence of intersexuality in children with cryptorchidism and hypospadias: stratification based on gonadal palpability and meatal position. J Urol, 1999. 162: 1003. 46. Kollin, C., et al. Cryptorchidism: a clinical perspective. Pediatr Endocrinol Rev, 2014. 11 Suppl 2: 240. 47. Caesar, R.E., et al. The incidence of the cremasteric reflex in normal boys. J Urol, 1994. 152: 779. 48. Barthold, J.S., et al. The epidemiology of congenital cryptorchidism, testicular (...) ascent and orchiopexy. J Urol, 2003. 170: 2396. 49. Turek, P.J., et al. The absent cryptorchid testis: surgical findings and their implications for diagnosis and etiology. J Urol, 1994. 151: 718. 50. Rabinowitz, R., et al. Late presentation of cryptorchidism: the etiology of testicular re-ascent. J Urol, 1997. 157: 1892. 51. Cendron, M., et al. Anatomical, morphological and volumetric analysis: a review of 759 cases of testicular maldescent. J Urol, 1993. 149: 570. 52. Braga, L.H., et al

2019 European Association of Urology

43. Male Infertility

al. Comparison of microdissection testicular sperm extraction, conventional testicular sperm extraction, and testicular sperm aspiration for nonobstructive azoospermia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Fertil Steril, 2015. 104: 1099. 21. Deruyver, Y., et al. Outcome of microdissection TESE compared with conventional TESE in non-obstructive azoospermia: a systematic review. Andrology, 2014. 2: 20. 22. Marconi, M., et al. Combined trifocal and microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (...) is the best technique for testicular sperm retrieval in “low-chance” nonobstructive azoospermia. Eur Urol, 2012. 62: 713. 23. Schlegel, P.N. Testicular sperm extraction: microdissection improves sperm yield with minimal tissue excision. Hum Reprod, 1999. 14: 131. 24. Schwarzer, J.U., et al. No relationship between biopsy sites near the main testicular vessels or rete testis and successful sperm retrieval using conventional or microdissection biopsies in 220 non-obstructive azoospermic men. Asian J Androl

2019 European Association of Urology

44. Undescended testes

risk of ascending testis. Advising boys and young men with a history of undescended testis to perform regular testicular self-examination during and after puberty, owing to the increased risk of developing testicular cancer. Offering parents/carers advice on sources of information and support. © . (...) complications include impaired fertility, increased risk of testicular cancer in the undescended testis, and increased risk of testicular torsion and inguinal hernia. Assessment of suspected undescended testes includes: Asking the parent/carer about the boy's gestational age, risk factors, and whether the testis has ever been palpable in the scrotum. Examining the person in a warm room with warm hands, to inspect the external genitalia and scrotum for abnormalities; palpate the scrotal sac on each side

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

45. Male Infertility

al. Comparison of microdissection testicular sperm extraction, conventional testicular sperm extraction, and testicular sperm aspiration for nonobstructive azoospermia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Fertil Steril, 2015. 104: 1099. 21. Deruyver, Y., et al. Outcome of microdissection TESE compared with conventional TESE in non-obstructive azoospermia: a systematic review. Andrology, 2014. 2: 20. 22. Marconi, M., et al. Combined trifocal and microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (...) is the best technique for testicular sperm retrieval in “low-chance” nonobstructive azoospermia. Eur Urol, 2012. 62: 713. 23. Schlegel, P.N. Testicular sperm extraction: microdissection improves sperm yield with minimal tissue excision. Hum Reprod, 1999. 14: 131. 24. Schwarzer, J.U., et al. No relationship between biopsy sites near the main testicular vessels or rete testis and successful sperm retrieval using conventional or microdissection biopsies in 220 non-obstructive azoospermic men. Asian J Androl

2018 European Association of Urology

46. Paediatric Urology

: 44. 45. Kaefer, M., et al. The incidence of intersexuality in children with cryptorchidism and hypospadias: stratification based on gonadal palpability and meatal position. J Urol, 1999. 162: 1003. 46. Kollin, C., et al. Cryptorchidism: a clinical perspective. Pediatr Endocrinol Rev, 2014. 11 Suppl 2: 240. 47. Caesar, R.E., et al. The incidence of the cremasteric reflex in normal boys. J Urol, 1994. 152: 779. 48. Barthold, J.S., et al. The epidemiology of congenital cryptorchidism, testicular (...) ascent and orchiopexy. J Urol, 2003. 170: 2396. 49. Turek, P.J., et al. The absent cryptorchid testis: surgical findings and their implications for diagnosis and etiology. J Urol, 1994. 151: 718. 50. Rabinowitz, R., et al. Late presentation of cryptorchidism: the etiology of testicular re-ascent. J Urol, 1997. 157: 1892. 51. Cendron, M., et al. Anatomical, morphological and volumetric analysis: a review of 759 cases of testicular maldescent. J Urol, 1993. 149: 570. 52. Braga, L.H., et al

2018 European Association of Urology

48. An update to the Greig Health Record: Preventive health care visits for children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years ? Technical report

, complications and death as well as for disease transmission. Pregnancy Pregnant teens also require specific counselling and screening, the details of which are beyond the scope of this document. A summary of the evidence-based recommendations is available from the American Academy of Family Physicians. - Breast and testicular routine or self-examination not recommended Teaching breast self-examination or routine clinical breast examination to adults 40 to 70 years of age is not recommended. There is fair (...) evidence of no benefit and good evidence of harm in the form of increased physician visits and benign biopsy results. For women under 40 years of age, there is little evidence on which to base a recommendation; however the very low incidence of breast cancer in this age group makes the net risk of harm more likely. There is evidence to recommend against counselling for testicular self-examination or routine clinical examination in individuals of average risk, in light of the low incidence of testicular

2016 Canadian Paediatric Society

49. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Patient Version

or anything else that seems unusual. It is suggested that women treated with a higher dose of radiation therapy to the chest do a monthly breast self-exam beginning at until age 25 years. Women who were treated with a lower dose of radiation to the chest may not need to begin checking for breast cancer at puberty. Talk to your doctor about when you should begin breast self-exams. (CBE) : An exam of the breast by a doctor or other health professional. The doctor will carefully feel the breasts and under

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

50. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

; however, there is still insufficient evidence to conclude a mortality benefit.[ - ] Breast self-exam has been shown to have no mortality benefit. No results have been published on the outcomes of incidence or mortality for CBE. Technologies such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular breast imaging are being evaluated, usually as adjuncts to mammography, and are not primary screening tools in the average population. Informed medical decision making is increasingly recommended (...) : Descriptive, population based. Internal and External Validity : Good. Consistency : Fair. Breast Self-Examination (BSE) Benefits BSE has been compared with no screening and has been shown to have no benefit in reducing breast cancer mortality. Magnitude of Effect : No effect.[ , ] Study Design : Two RCTs. Internal Validity and Consistency : Fair. External Validity : Poor. Harms There is solid evidence that formal instruction and encouragement to perform BSE leads to more breast biopsies and more diagnoses

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

51. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

, including both self-examination and clinical examination. Benefits The evidence is inadequate to determine whether visual examination of the skin in asymptomatic individuals leads to a reduction in mortality from melanomatous skin cancer. Further, in asymptomatic populations, the effect of visual skin examination on mortality from nonmelanomatous skin cancers is unknown. Magnitude of Effect : Unknown. Study Design : Direct evidence limited to a single ecologic study. Internal Validity : Poor (...) aged 50 years and older; however, data from the same time period indicate that incidence rates stabilized in individuals younger than 50 years.[ ] From 2007 to 2016, mortality rates declined by about 2% per year in individuals aged 50 years and older and declined by about 4% per year in individuals younger than 50 years.[ ] The long-term rise in incidence rates is caused, at least in part, by screening in clinical settings and self-examination resulting from campaigns to increase skin cancer

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

53. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

SEER data, conditional relative survival up to 25 years after diagnosis was studied in a cohort of adolescent and young adult patients (N = 205,954) diagnosed with a first malignant cancer (thyroid, melanoma, testicular, breast, lymphoma, leukemia, and central nervous system [CNS] tumors). For all cancer types combined, among individuals who survived up to 5 years, subsequent 5-year relative survival exceeded 95% by 7 years after diagnosis. According to this study, most adolescent and young adult

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

54. Genetic Testing and Management of Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes

reports have not demonstrated this consistently ( 55,75 ). In two recent studies the relative risk of prostate cancer Table 7 . Continued Cancer site General population risk a Syndrome risk Average age of diagnosis (years) References Testicular (Sertoli cell tumor) 10 cumulative colorectal adenomas, a family history of one of the adeno- matous polyposis syndromes, or a history of adenomas and FAP-type extracolonic manifestations (duodenal/ampullary adenomas, desmoid tumors (abdominal>peripheral

2015 American College of Gastroenterology

55. Male Infertility

for detection of CIS. The list of high-risk patients includes men with infertility and bilateral TM, atrophic testes, undescended testes, a history of TGCT, and contralateral TM [231]. 3K.4 Recommendations for germ cell malignancy and testicular microcalcification Recommendations GR As for all men, patients with TM and without special risk factors (see below) should be encouraged to perform self-examination because this might result in early detection of TGCT. B Testicular biopsy should be offered to men (...) Diagnostic evaluation 7 3A.2.1 Semen analysis 7 3A.2.1.1 Frequency of semen analysis 8 3A.2.2 Recommendations for the diagnostic evaluation of male infertility 8 3B PRIMARY SPERMATOGENIC FAILURE 8 3B.1 Aetiology 8 3B.2 Diagnostic evaluation 9 3B.2.1 Semen analysis 9 3B.2.2 Hormonal determinations 9 3B.2.3 Testicular biopsy 9 3B.3 Conclusions and recommendations for testicular deficiency 10 3C GENETIC DISORDERS IN INFERTILITY 10 3C.1 Chromosomal abnormalities 10 3C.1.1 Sex chromosome abnormalities

2015 European Association of Urology

56. Evaluation and Treatment of Cryptorchidism

) Patient Safety and Quality of Care Accreditations and Reporting Patient Education Evaluation and Treatment of Cryptorchidism (2014) Published 2014 Cryptorchidism or undescended testis (UDT) is one of the most common pediatric disorders of the male endocrine glands and the most common genital disorder identified at birth. This clinical guideline discusses diagnosis and treatment to prevent future risks, including impairment of fertility potential, testicular malignancy, torsion and/or associated (...) increased risks of impairment of fertility potential, testicular malignancy, torsion and/or associated inguinal hernia. Cryptorchidism has evolved significantly over the past half century, with respect to both diagnosis and treatment. The current standard of therapy in the United States is orchidopexy (also referred to as orchiopexy in the literature), or surgical repositioning of the testis within the scrotal sac, while hormonal therapy has fewer advocates. Successful scrotal relocation of the testis

2014 American Urological Association

57. The male reproductive system. An overview of common problems

testicular cancer. there is no evidence from randomised controlled trials – and it is unlikely that such trials could ever be designed – to prove that regular testicular self examination reduces mortality. A recent cancer council Australia position statement recommends that men become aware of the health of their testicles, and encourages men with testicular lumps to present early for medical assessment. 9 it does not recommend encouraging testicular self examination. 9 it stands to reason that early (...) system, and outlines current treatment options. Discussion Erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, loss of libido, testicular cancer and prostate disease may cause embarrassment to the patient and, occasionally, the general practitioner. We describe how patients affected by these conditions may present to general practice, and discuss the reasons why they may not present. We also discuss how GPs can overcome difficulties in identifying and dealing with their male patients suffering from male

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

58. A Gender-based Comparison in Health Behaviors and State of Happiness among University Students Full Text available with Trip Pro

. The health questionnaire, adapted from Health and Behavior Survey and the Subjective Happiness Scale, was used to assess self-reported happiness. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS version 22. Results Overall self-reported health behaviors were found to be more prevalent in females as compared to males, but males reported a better self-reported general health (p = 0.012). Testicular and breast self-examination was not common in both genders. Smoking was found to be more common in males (p < 0.01

2018 Cureus

59. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about the clinical effectiveness of screening and diagnostic tests for cancer? Full Text available with Trip Pro

, which would have no benefits for the patients, might cause harm and possibly would generate costs. Additionally, it could divert healthcare professionals and resources away from the most severely ill patients. One well-known example of overdiagnosis took place during the 1950s in the United States, when breast self-examination (BSE) was widely advocated, only for it to be concluded in the 1990s that BSE had no impact on reducing breast cancer mortality. A second important concept to have in mind (...) tests, in terms of the time that elapsed until detection of recurrence, overall survival and quality of life. In two RCTs, follow-up care provided by trained and untrained general practitioners working in an organized practice setting had comparable effectiveness to that delivered by hospital-based specialists, in terms of overall survival, detection of recurrence and quality of life. For further details, refer to the original abstract, available at: . Regular self-examination or clinical

2017 Sao Paulo Medical Journal

60. Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty):Volume 104

to the article, suppose you were a sixteen year old male's female physician, first visit, and he insisted that you, the physician, examine his testicles for tumor even without presenting any history of abnormalities on self-examination and without any genital symptoms or family history of cancer. The appointment was for a "sore throat". By the way, his parents are present in the waiting room. I am just curious how my visitors here would interpret the request and what would be your final response (...) . -- Banterings At , said... 58flyer, I would say that the nurse's response to your penile erection was unprofessional (it is NOT her responsibility to attempt to terminate an erection by distraction or some "reflex" caused by intentional testicular pain.) This action on her part demonstrates her insecurity. She should have continued on without concern or asked you if you would rather clean your genitalia on your own. Attacking the patient sounds criminal! ..Maurice. At , Anonymous said... Maurice Assaulting

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>