How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

181 results for

Talar Tilt

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Talar Tilt

Talar Tilt Talar Tilt Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Talar Tilt Talar Tilt Aka: Talar Tilt , Inversion stress Test II (...) . Indications III. Images IV. Technique Brace heel with left hand Invert foot with right hand Compare to opposite side V. Signs of Ankle Joint instability Lack of endpoint on translation VI. Interpretation of Positive Test: Grade 3 Ankle Sprain Calcaneofibular Ligament Rupture Anterior talofibular ligament also ruptured Tested with Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Talar Tilt." Click on the image (or right click) to open

2018 FP Notebook

2. Realignment Surgery for Severe Talar Tilt Secondary to Paralytic Cavovarus. (PubMed)

Realignment Surgery for Severe Talar Tilt Secondary to Paralytic Cavovarus. Realignment surgeries for mild to moderate ankle osteoarthritis with minimal talar tilt have been reported to be effective. However, there has been no report on joint-sparing surgery of ankle osteoarthritis in patients with paralytic disorders who have severe talar tilt. We therefore investigated whether ankle osteoarthritis with severe talar tilt caused by paralytic disorders can be improved after operative (...) ). The Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) was used for postoperative assessment. Pre- and postoperative radiographic parameters were compared.Mean AOFAS score improved from 39.1 (range, 32-57) preoperatively to 77.9 (range, 72-85) postoperatively. Mean talar tilt improved from 17.4 degrees (range, 9.5-33.5 degrees) to 1.4 degrees (range, 0-4 degrees). Degree of osteoarthritis according to Takakura classification improved in all ankles except two. Mean heel alignment angle was reduced from 40.4 degrees (range

2013 Foot & Ankle International

3. Finite Element Study of Implant Subsidence and Medial Tilt in Agility Ankle Replacement (PubMed)

Finite Element Study of Implant Subsidence and Medial Tilt in Agility Ankle Replacement BACKGROUND Clinical studies indicate that in total ankle arthroplasty, postoperative implant subsidence and medial tilt become two significant concerns of the ankle replacement system, and which are associated with the contact between the bones and the talar component. Up to now, little attention has focused on the contact between the bones and the talar component. MATERIAL AND METHODS In order to address (...) implant subsidence and medial tilt, one three-dimensional finite element model of contact between the bone and the talar components was built with the material properties of the cancellous bone interpolated from the experimental data, which represents variation of material properties through the cancellous bones. The finite element model was used to study the following: variation of the Young's modulus of the bones, stiffness of the talar component, loading direction, and loading magnitude

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research

4. Talar Tilt

Talar Tilt Talar Tilt Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Talar Tilt Talar Tilt Aka: Talar Tilt , Inversion stress Test II (...) . Indications III. Images IV. Technique Brace heel with left hand Invert foot with right hand Compare to opposite side V. Signs of Ankle Joint instability Lack of endpoint on translation VI. Interpretation of Positive Test: Grade 3 Ankle Sprain Calcaneofibular Ligament Rupture Anterior talofibular ligament also ruptured Tested with Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Talar Tilt." Click on the image (or right click) to open

2015 FP Notebook

5. Incidence and Radiographic Predictors of Valgus Tibiotalar Tilt After Hindfoot Fusion. (PubMed)

procedure was triple arthrodesis (n = 101, 54%). Twenty-seven patients demonstrated tibiotalar tilt preoperatively.A total of 51 patients (27.3%) developed valgus tibiotalar tilt postoperatively at an average of 3.6 months after surgery. We found that an increase in the preoperative Meary (lateral talar-first metatarsal) angle (hazard ratio, 1.039; 95% confidence interval, 1.002-1.077; P < .05) was associated with the development of tibiotalar tilt. An increase in the postoperative Meary angle (hazard (...) Incidence and Radiographic Predictors of Valgus Tibiotalar Tilt After Hindfoot Fusion. The development of valgus tibiotalar tilt following hindfoot arthrodesis is rarely discussed in the literature. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of valgus tibiotalar tilt and to evaluate if there were any radiographic predictors for the development of valgus tibiotalar tilt.Patients who underwent hindfoot fusion between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013 were identified. Charts were

2017 Foot & Ankle International

6. Normal Variation of Talar Tilt of the Ankle in Children (PubMed)

Normal Variation of Talar Tilt of the Ankle in Children Sixty normal children were examined clinically and radiologically, using a special apparatus with a goniometer and a tensometer to standardize stress tests when applying valgus and varus forces to the ankle. It was noted that the clinical movement of inversion is not entirely due to a subtalar movement; indeed a talar tilt appears to be physiological. The range of normal in these patients, age range 6 to 15 years, was 0 to 27 degrees (...) with an average talar tilt of 7 degrees . The talar tilt is not necessarily the same in both ankles of any one individual and it is never noted in eversion. The talar tilt is more marked in younger children in the position of equinus.When interpreting radiographs of recently injured ankles, it is wise to recall that a talar tilt need not be the result of trauma and that it may be physiological and yet unequal on both sides.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1965 Canadian Medical Association Journal

7. Assessment of ankle and hindfoot stability and joint pressures using a human cadaveric model of a large lateral talar process excision: a biomechanical study. (PubMed)

of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability.A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint (...) pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment.In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Medicine

8. Safe Zone for Placement of Talar Screws When Fusing the Ankle With an Anterior Plating System. (PubMed)

this technique.In 5 cadaveric ankles fixed with anterior plates, talar screws were placed up to the subtalar joint without penetration using lateral fluoroscopy to guide screw length. After dissection, the true distance from the screw tip to subchondral surface was measured. In addition, 4 readers measured the perceived distance from screw tip to subchondral surface using direct lateral, 10 degrees cephalad tilt lateral, and 10 degrees caudal tilt lateral fluoroscopic images on 2 separate occasions.Nineteen (63 (...) and actual distances between screw tip and bone margin (r = .35, P < .001). Tilting the c-arm 10 degrees cephalad and directing screws toward the posterior facet improved the ability to detect screw penetration and directing screws toward the middle facet diminished it (P < .05). A safe zone of screw placement was defined by region.Use of a lateral fluoroscopic image to guide talar screw placement may lead to an unacceptably high rate of subtalar joint penetration.Understanding the limitations of lateral

2015 Foot & Ankle International

9. Effect of Supramalleolar Osteotomy and Total Ankle Replacement on Talar Position in the Varus Osteoarthritic Ankle: A Comparative Study. (PubMed)

ankles with a varus-tilted ankle, 52 patients were treated with SMOT and 52 with TAR. Weight-bearing radiographs were analyzed to measure the talar position in all 3 planes, including the talar tilt angle (TT), the sagittal talocalcaneal inclination angle (TCI), and the talometatarsal 1 angle (TMT1) pre- and postoperatively.Although after TAR the talar position was corrected in all the 3 planes, SMOT on the other hand did not fully correct the TT, and furthermore TMT1 remained unchanged.Resurfacing (...) Effect of Supramalleolar Osteotomy and Total Ankle Replacement on Talar Position in the Varus Osteoarthritic Ankle: A Comparative Study. In varus osteoarthritic ankles, joint congruency is usually lost leading to progressive wear of the medial tibiotalar joint. Recent studies have shown that balancing the hindfoot with the aid of supramalleolar osteotomy (SMOT) is an effective method to decrease symptoms and to delay progression of osteoarthritis of the ankle joint. Resurfacing the articular

2014 Foot & Ankle International

10. Radiological Morphology of Peritalar Instability in Varus and Valgus Tilted Ankles. (PubMed)

Radiological Morphology of Peritalar Instability in Varus and Valgus Tilted Ankles. Varus and valgus talar tilt in weight-bearing ankles can be explained by loss of peritalar stability allowing the talus to shift and rotate on the calcaneal and navicular surfaces. Little is known about the underlying destabilization process or the resulting talar malpositions. The purpose of this study was to determine talar position in 3 radiographic planes of varus and valgus tilted ankles.Standard weight (...) ), respectively. The 3 predominant valgus malposition configurations (95%, or 77/81) were neutral or plantar flexion (sagittal plane) combined with neutral/external rotation and neutral (horizontal plane), respectively.In varus and valgus tilted ankles, talar frontal plane alignment does not predict talar sagittal and horizontal position, indicating that peritalar instability leads to various talar malpositions. Prior to operative treatment of varus and valgus tilted ankles, thorough 3-dimensional analysis

2014 Foot & Ankle International

11. CRACKCast E058 – Ankle and Foot

the ATFL Seated with knee at 90 deg. and a neutral ankle Cup the heel with your palm while passively flexing the hip and assess for talar displacement +’ve if: “Clunk” noticed Sulcus appears antero-medially over the joint Inversion stress test Talar tilt test Assesses the ATFL and CFL Invert heel while knee is flexed at 90 degrees and ankle in neutral position +’ve if: Head of talus palpated laterally Increased laxity compared to the other side External rotation stress test Used to assess (...) injuries: Ligament injuries: AntTFL > CalcFL > > PostTFL Grade I: stretching without tearing or joint instability Grade II: partial tear, SWELLING PAIN, and mod. instability Grade III: complete tear, severe edema and ecchymosis. Inability to wt. bear = grade 2/3 injury if no # **Must exclude deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injury** Ligament stress testing is moderately useful, and should be compared bilaterally Anterior drawer/talar tilt/external rotation test: lateral ligament injuries Look

2017 CandiEM

12. Ankle and Foot Surgical Guideline

Ligament Repair/ Reconstruction e.g. Br?strom procedure, Watson- Jones procedure Severe ankle sprain or recurrent sprains leading to instability A discrete documented work-related ankle injury AND Ankle “gives way” OR Swelling OR Difficulty walking on uneven ground Positive instability testing: e.g. Anterior drawer testing OR Asymmetric inversion laxity (when compared to contralateral side) Bilateral stress X-rays w/ asymmetrical stress tests: Talar tilt > 10 degrees OR Anterior displacement index (...) such as Thompson, Squeeze, External Rotation Stress, Anterior Drawer, and the Talar Tilt test. 37 In addition to performing a thorough exam, it is critical to get an accurate history of injury occurrence, previous injuries, and underlying comorbidities/ risk factors, which may predispose the worker to further foot and ankle injury. A. Imaging The recommended imaging procedures for various foot and ankle surgeries are specified in the criteria table. Weight bearing x-rays are recommended when determining

2017 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

13. Presence of Subfibular Ossicle Does Not Affect the Outcome of Arthroscopic Modified Broström Procedure for Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability. (PubMed)

the arthroscopic MBP, SFO was removed with all inside technique regardless of size. Patients who were not followed for more than a minimum of 12 months after surgery were excluded. The patients were divided into 2 groups: ankles with SFOs were assigned to the SFO group and the others to the non-SFO (NSFO) group. The evaluation tools used included the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hind foot score, a pain visual analog scale, and the talar tilt angle.Following the inclusion criteria (...) , respectively). The mean ± standard deviation talar tilt improved from 8.7 ± 5.0° preoperatively to 4.6 ± 3.6° at the final follow-up in the SFO group, and from 7.3 ± 4.4° preoperatively to 3.2 ± 3.0° at the final follow-up in the NSFO group. Neither the preoperative nor final talar tilt angle differed between the 2 groups (P = .300 and P = .072, respectively).All-inside arthroscopic MBP after SFO resection was as successful as the same surgery without SFO resection. The clinical outcomes of the SFO

2019 Arthroscopy

14. Medial malleolar stress fracture resulting from repetitive stress caused by lateral ankle instability: A case report. (PubMed)

showed a vertical fracture line in the medial malleolus. Computed tomography also showed the vertical fracture in the medial malleolus. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed mild bone marrow edema in the medial malleolar area and total rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament.Surgery was performed under general anesthesia, and we checked the instability of his ankle using a C-arm image intensifier, and the varus talar tilt angle was increased (10.3°). The medial malleolus stress fracture was fixed

2019 Medicine

15. Additional mesenchymal stem cell injection improves the outcomes of marrow stimulation combined with supramalleolar osteotomy in varus ankle osteoarthritis: short-term clinical results with second-look arthroscopic evaluation (PubMed)

to marrow stimulation alone (group I), and 31 were subjected to marrow stimulation with MSC injection (group II). Clinical outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. Radiological outcome variables included the tibial-ankle surface (TAS), talar tilt (TT), and tibial-lateral surface (TLS) angles. In second-look arthroscopy, cartilage regeneration was evaluated using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS (...) , respectively). At second-look arthroscopy, there were significant differences in ICRS grades between groups(P = 0.015 for medial aspect of the talar dome, P = 0.044 for medial aspect of the tibial plafond, and P = 0.005 for articular surface of the medial malleolus). ICRS grades were significantly correlated with clinical outcomes in both groups (all P < 0.05). Mean TAS, TT, and TLS angles improved significantly after SMO in both groups but were not significantly correlated with clinical outcomes or ICRS

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Journal of experimental orthopaedics

16. Following the correction of varus deformity of the knee through total knee arthroplasty, significant compensatory changes occur not only at the ankle and subtalar joint, but also at the foot. (PubMed)

at the subtalar joint in accordance with the extent of the correction.For this prospective study, 375 knees of patients who underwent TKA between 2011 and 2012 were enrolled. The varus angle of the knee, talar tilt of the ankle joint (TT), ground-talar dome angle of the foot (GD), anterior surface angle of the distal tibia and lateral surface angle of the distal tibia, heel alignment ratio (HR), heel alignment angle (HA), and heel alignment distance (HD) were measured on radiographs obtained pre-operatively

2018 Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

17. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability with ligamentum bifurcatum injury: An observational study. (PubMed)

Society (AOFAS) scores, visual analog scale pain scores, Karlsson scores, and radiographic assessment.Of the patients with concurrent LB injury, 82.1% (92/112) returned for final evaluation. Postoperatively, most patients recovered very well. However, the outcome was not ideal in those who underwent excision of the anterior process of the calcaneus; there were significant postoperative decreases in talar tilt (P < .05) and anterior drawer (P < .05), but there was no significant postoperative

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Medicine

18. A new minimally invasive method for anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments with a Tightrope system (PubMed)

). The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was improved from 70.2 ± 5.4 preoperatively to 92.4 ± 5.3 at the final follow-up (p < 0.01). Radiologically, the mean anterior talar displacement was 13.1 ± 2.7 mm preoperatively versus 5.6 ± 1.3 mm at last follow-up (p < 0.01),and the mean varus talar tilt angle was 15.0° ± 2.4° preoperatively versus 5.6° ± 1.9° at the last follow-up (p < 0.01). Patients were satisfied ('excellent' or 'good') in 23 ankles (92%). Two patients reported residual (...) system. The calcaneal tunnel and talar tunnel were made as our previous method. The mean final follow-up was 12.2 months (range 10-14). Visual Analogue Scale for pain, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score, and patients' subjective satisfaction were used to measure clinical outcomes. Preoperative and postoperative stress tests were performed and radiographic parameters were measured.The Visual Analogue Scale decreased from 3.0 ± 1.4 to 1.3 ± 0.8 at the last follow-up (p < 0.01

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery

19. Surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability: a meta-analysis (PubMed)

studies compared non-anatomic reconstruction versus anatomic repairment. In one study, nerve damage was more frequent in non-anatomic reconstruction group; the other one reported that radiological measurement of ankle laxity showed that non-anatomic reconstruction provided higher reduction of talar tilt angle. Two studies comparing two anatomic repairment surgical techniques (transosseous suture versus imbrication) showed no significant difference in any clinical outcome at the follow-up except (...) operation time. One study compared two different anatomic repairment techniques. They found that the double anchor technique was superior with respect to the reduction of talar tilt than single anchor technique. One study compared an anatomic reconstruction procedure with a modified Brostrom technique. Primary reconstruction combined with ligament advanced reinforcement system results in better patient-scored clinical outcome, at 2 years post-surgery, than the modified Brostrom procedure.There

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of orthopaedic surgery and research

20. inStability Treated With Ligament RecOnstruction Augmented With iNternal bracinG

of giving way of the ankle and has positive signs of ankle instability during physical exam (talar tilt score of >15 degrees compared to contralateral ankle or anterior drawer test score of >10mm compared to the contralateral ankle. Conservative therapy has failed. Normal foot and ankle anatomy as determined by orthopedic surgeon. Patients in whom their ankle symptoms interfere with their physical activities. Patients with isolated anterior talofibular ligament which is indicated for repair using

2018 Clinical Trials

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>