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Tai Chi

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1381. Can Tai chi enhance cognitive vitality? A preliminary study of cognitive executive control in older adults after A Tai chi intervention. (Abstract)

Can Tai chi enhance cognitive vitality? A preliminary study of cognitive executive control in older adults after A Tai chi intervention. We explored tasks of cognitive and physical performance in 20 older adult subjects after a 10 week Tai chi program in older adults using a pre-to-post test design. Improvement post intervention was seen in two cognitive measures of executive function and several physical performance measures. Preliminary findings in this non-controlled study suggest (...) the possibility of beneficial effects of Tai chi on cognitive executive function in older adults and support the need to pursue this hypothesis in a randomized controlled trial.

2008 Journal of the South Carolina Medical Association (1975)

1382. A randomized, controlled trial of tai chi for the prevention of falls: the Central Sydney tai chi trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A randomized, controlled trial of tai chi for the prevention of falls: the Central Sydney tai chi trial. To determine the effectiveness of a 16-week community-based tai chi program in reducing falls and improving balance in people aged 60 and older.Randomized, controlled trial with waiting list control group.Community in Sydney, Australia.Seven hundred two relatively healthy community-dwelling people aged 60 and older (mean age 69).Sixteen-week program of community-based tai chi classes of 1 (...) hour duration per week.Falls during 16 and 24 weeks of follow-up were assessed using a calendar method. Balance was measured at baseline and 16-week follow-up using six balance tests.Falls were less frequent in the tai chi group than in the control group. Using Cox regression and time to first fall, the hazard ratio after 16 weeks was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.51-1.01, P=.06), and after 24 weeks it was 0.67 (95% CI=0.49-0.93, P=.02). There was no difference in the percentage

2007 Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Controlled trial quality: predicted high

1383. Balance control, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory fitness among older Tai Chi practitioners Full Text available with Trip Pro

Balance control, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory fitness among older Tai Chi practitioners Tai Chi Chuan (TTC) exercise has beneficial effects on the components of physical condition and can produce a substantial reduction in the risk of multiple falls. Previous studies have shown that short term TCC exercise did not improve the scores in the single leg stance test with eyes closed and the sit and reach test. There has apparently been no research into the effects of TCC on total body

2000 British Journal of Sports Medicine

1384. Kinematic and electromyographic analysis of the push movement in tai chi Full Text available with Trip Pro

Kinematic and electromyographic analysis of the push movement in tai chi Tai chi is a form of exercise derived from the martial art folk traditions of China. The force used in tai chi includes different principles of mechanical advantage. No studies on the kinematic features of tai chi exercise have been published.To analyse the kinematics and electromyographic characteristics of tai chi.An experienced tai chi master was asked to perform a sequence of basic movements: ward off, roll back, press (...) in the anteroposterior and mediolateral component was unique, and the sway or deviation from the path was small. The master maintained an upright posture and maintained a low CG (hips, knees, and ankles bent) while travelling slowly and steadily from one position to another.The eccentric muscle contraction of the lower limbs in the push movement of tai chi may help to strengthen the muscles.

2003 British Journal of Sports Medicine

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