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Tai Chi

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1321. The influence of intense Tai Chi training on physical performance and hemodynamic outcomes in transitionally frail, older adults. (Abstract)

The influence of intense Tai Chi training on physical performance and hemodynamic outcomes in transitionally frail, older adults. Few data exist to evaluate whether Tai Chi (TC) training improves physical performance and hemodynamic outcomes more than a wellness education (WE) program does among older fallers transitioning to frailty.This 48-week randomized clinical trial was provided at 10 matched pairs of congregate living facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area to 291 women and 20 men

2006 The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1322. Neural mechanisms underlying balance improvement with short term Tai Chi training. (Abstract)

Neural mechanisms underlying balance improvement with short term Tai Chi training. Though previous research has shown that Tai Chi reduces falls risk in older adults, no studies have examined underlying neural mechanisms responsible for balance improvement. We aimed to determine the efficacy of Tai Chi training in improving neuromuscular response characteristics underlying balance control in balance-impaired older adults.Twenty-two balance-impaired older adults were randomly divided into Tai (...) Chi (TC) or control groups. Nineteen subjects (age 68-92, BERG 44 or less) completed the study. TC training included repetitive exercises using TC motor and biomechanical strategies, techniques, and postural elements. Control training included axial mobility exercises, balance/awareness education and stress reduction. Groups trained 1.5 hours/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. After post-testing the control group received TC training. Subjects walked across a force plate triggered to move forward 15 cm

2006 Aging clinical and experimental research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1323. The effects of Tai Chi Chuan on physiological function and fear of falling in the less robust elderly: an intervention study for preventing falls. (Abstract)

The effects of Tai Chi Chuan on physiological function and fear of falling in the less robust elderly: an intervention study for preventing falls. The aim of this report is to investigate the effects of 8 weeks of intensive Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) training on physiological function and fear of falling (FOF) in the less-robust elderly. Forty-nine community-dwelling elderly, aged 60 or older, were classified randomly into a TCC training or control group. Physical performance measures (including one

2005 Archives of gerontology and geriatrics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1324. Comparison of the effects of Tai Chi and resistance training on bone metabolism in the elderly: a feasibility study. (Abstract)

Comparison of the effects of Tai Chi and resistance training on bone metabolism in the elderly: a feasibility study. This feasibility study compared the effects of Tai Chi (TC) and resistance training (RT) on bone metabolism in the elderly. Twenty eight sedentary, elder adults, were randomized into either TC (n = 14, 78.8 +/-1.3 years) or RT (n = 14, 79.4 +/-2.2 years) to participate in 40 min of exercise per session, 3 sessions/week for 24 weeks. The outcome measures assessed were

2007 The American journal of Chinese medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1325. Tai Chi improves balance and mobility in people with Parkinson disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai Chi improves balance and mobility in people with Parkinson disease. This pilot study examines the effects of Tai Chi on balance, gait and mobility in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Thirty-three people with PD were randomly assigned to either a Tai Chi group or a control group. The Tai Chi group participated in 20 1-h long training sessions completed within 10-13 weeks; whereas, the control group had two testing sessions between 10 and 13 weeks apart without interposed training. The Tai (...) Chi group improved more than the control group on the Berg Balance Scale, UPDRS, Timed Up and Go, tandem stance test, six-minute walk, and backward walking. Neither group improved in forward walking or the one leg stance test. All Tai Chi participants reported satisfaction with the program and improvements in well-being. Tai Chi appears to be an appropriate, safe and effective form of exercise for some individuals with mild-moderately severe PD.

2008 Gait & posture Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1326. Tai Chi for treating knee osteoarthritis: designing a long-term follow up randomized controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai Chi for treating knee osteoarthritis: designing a long-term follow up randomized controlled trial. Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA) is a major cause of pain and functional impairment among elders. Currently, there are neither feasible preventive intervention strategies nor effective medical remedies for the management of KOA. Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese mind-body exercise that is reported to enhance muscle function, balance and flexibility, and to reduce pain, depression and anxiety, may safely (...) and effectively be used to treat KOA. However, current evidence is inconclusive. Our study examines the effects of a 12-week Tai Chi program compared with an attention control (wellness education and stretching) on pain, functional capacity, psychosocial variables, joint proprioception and health status in elderly people with KOA. The study will be completed by July 2009.Forty eligible patients, age > 55 yr, BMI < or = 40 kg/m2 with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (American College of Rheumatology criteria

2008 BMC musculoskeletal disorders Controlled trial quality: predicted high

1327. Improving sleep quality in older adults with moderate sleep complaints: A randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi Chih. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Improving sleep quality in older adults with moderate sleep complaints: A randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi Chih. To determine the efficacy of a novel behavioral intervention, Tai Chi Chih, to promote sleep quality in older adults with moderate sleep complaints.Randomized controlled trial with 16 weeks of teaching followed by practice and assessment 9 weeks later. The main outcome measure was sleep quality, as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI).General community at 2 (...) sites in the US between 2001 and 2005.Volunteer sample of 112 healthy older adults, aged 59 to 86 years.Random allocation to Tai Chi Chih or health education for 25 weeks.Among adults with moderate sleep complaints, as defined by PSQI global score of 5 or greater, subjects in the Tai Chi Chih condition were more likely to achieve a treatment response, as defined by PSQI less than 5, compared to those in health education (P < 0.05). Subjects in the Tai Chi Chih condition with poor sleep quality also

2008 Sleep Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1328. Neural mechanisms underlying balance control in Tai Chi. (Abstract)

Neural mechanisms underlying balance control in Tai Chi. The efficacy of Tai Chi (TC) to improve neuromuscular response characteristics underlying dynamic balance recovery in balance-impaired seniors at high risk for falling was examined during perturbed walking.Twenty-two subjects were randomized into TC or control groups. Nineteen subjects (68-92 years, BERG 44 or less) completed the study. TC training incorporated repetitive exercises using TC's essential motor/biomechanical strategies

2008 Medicine and sport science Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1329. Effect of Tai Chi on depressive symptoms amongst Chinese older patients with major depression: the role of social support. (Abstract)

Effect of Tai Chi on depressive symptoms amongst Chinese older patients with major depression: the role of social support. The objective of this study was to determine whether the effects of Tai Chi training on depressive symptoms in Chinese older patients with depression remained statistically significant after social support was controlled. Fourteen community-dwelling older patients from a psychogeriatric outpatient clinic were randomly assigned to either a 3-month Tai Chi intervention (...) with 36 sessions or a wait-list control. Depression was assessed by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), whereas social support was measured by the Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS). By performing multiple regression analyses, we examined whether the effect of group assignment (Tai Chi and control groups) on five measures of depressive symptoms (i.e. the total scores of the CES-D scale, and scores of all its subscales including symptoms related to somatic, negative affect

2008 Medicine and sport science Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1330. Tai Chi Chuan for breast cancer survivors. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai Chi Chuan for breast cancer survivors. Treatment for breast cancer produces side effects that diminish functional capacity and quality of life (QOL) among survivors. Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) is a moderate form of exercise that may improve functional capacity and QOL in these individuals. Women who completed treatment for breast cancer were randomized to receive TCC or psychosocial support therapy for 12 weeks (60 min; three times weekly).The TCC group demonstrated significant improvements

2008 Medicine and sport science Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1331. Tai Chi improves pain and functional status in adults with rheumatoid arthritis: results of a pilot single-blinded randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

Tai Chi improves pain and functional status in adults with rheumatoid arthritis: results of a pilot single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious health problem resulting in significant morbidity and disability. Tai Chi may be beneficial to patients with RA as a result of effects on muscle strength and 'mind-body' interactions. To obtain preliminary data on the effects of Tai Chi on RA, we conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial. Twenty patients (...) with functional class I or II RA were randomly assigned to Tai Chi or attention control in twice-weekly sessions for 12 weeks. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response criterion, functional capacity, health-related quality of life and the depression index were assessed.At 12 weeks, 5/10 patients (50%) randomized to Tai Chi achieved an ACR 20% response compared with 0/10 (0%) in the control (p = 0.03). Tai Chi had greater improvement in the disability index (p = 0.01), vitality subscale

2008 Medicine and sport science Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1332. Translation of an effective tai chi intervention into a community-based falls-prevention program. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Translation of an effective tai chi intervention into a community-based falls-prevention program. Tai chi--moving for better balance, a falls-prevention program developed from a randomized controlled trial for community-based use, was evaluated with the re-aim framework in 6 community centers. The program had a 100% adoption rate and 87% reach into the target older adult population. All centers implemented the intervention with good fidelity, and participants showed significant improvements (...) in health-related outcome measures. This evidence-based tai chi program is practical to disseminate and can be effectively implemented and maintained in community settings.

2008 American Journal of Public Health

1333. Improving glycaemic and BP control in type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of tai chi. (Abstract)

Improving glycaemic and BP control in type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of tai chi. This study assessed the effect of tai chi on glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and health status (SF-36) in adults with type 2 diabetes.A randomised controlled trial of tai chi classes for 6 months versus wait list control for adults with type 2 diabetes and a baseline HbA1c of 7% or more.A total of 53 patients were recruited to the study and randomised to tai chi (28) or control group (25 (...) ). There were improvements in HbA1c; 6 m walk test, and total cholesterol between baseline and follow up but the difference between the two treatment groups was not statistically significant. Health status results showed improvements in three domains for the tai chi group.There was no significant improvement in metabolic control or cardiovascular risk at follow up compared to the control group. Patients in the tai chi group showed improvements in physical and social functioning.

2008 Australian family physician Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1334. Tai chi for disease activity and flexibility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis--a controlled clinical trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai chi for disease activity and flexibility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis--a controlled clinical trial. We investigated the effects of tai chi on disease activity, flexibility and depression in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We allocated 40 patients to either a tai chi treatment group or a no-treatment control group. The tai chi group performed 60 min of tai chi twice weekly for eight consecutive weeks and 8 weeks of home-based tai chi, after which the group showed (...) significant improvement in disease activity and flexibility compared to the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the tai chi group than they were during pre-treatment, while they did not change in the control group. These findings suggest that tai chi can improve disease activity and flexibility for patients with AS. Tai chi is an easily accessible therapy for patients and, as such, may be an effective intervention for AS. However, we cannot completely discount the possibility

2008 Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1335. Tai chi and self-rated quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness in older adults: a randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

Tai chi and self-rated quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness in older adults: a randomized controlled trial. To determine the effectiveness of tai chi on self-rated sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in older adults reporting moderate sleep complaints.Randomized, controlled trial with allocation to tai chi or exercise control.General community.One hundred eighteen women and men aged 60 to 92.Participants were randomized into tai chi or low-impact exercise and participated in a 60-minute (...) latency, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances) (P<.01), PSQI global score (P=.001), and ESS scores (P=.002) in comparison with the low-impact exercise participants. Tai chi participants reported sleep-onset latency of about 18 minutes less per night (95% confidence interval (CI)=-28.64 to -7.12) and sleep duration of about 48 minutes more per night (95% CI=14.71-82.41) than low-impact exercise participants. Tai chi participants also showed better scores in secondary outcome measures

2004 Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Controlled trial quality: predicted high

1336. A randomized, prospective study of the effects of Tai Chi Chun exercise on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. (Abstract)

A randomized, prospective study of the effects of Tai Chi Chun exercise on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. To evaluate the potential benefits of programmed Tai Chi Chun (TCC) exercise on the weight-bearing bones of early postmenopausal women.Age-matched and randomized prospective intervention.University medical school.One hundred thirty-two healthy postmenopausal women (mean age, 54.0+/-3.5y) within 10 years of menopause onset were recruited and randomized into the TCC exercise

2004 Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1337. The influence of Tai Chi training on the center of pressure trajectory during gait initiation in older adults. (Abstract)

The influence of Tai Chi training on the center of pressure trajectory during gait initiation in older adults. To determine if a program of intense Tai Chi exercise that has been shown to reduce the risk of falling in older adults improves postural control by altering the center of pressure (COP) trajectory during gait initiation.Before-after trial.Biomechanics research laboratory.Twenty-eight older adults transitioning to frailty who participated in either a 48-week intervention of intense Tai (...) Chi training or a wellness education (WE) program.Eight Tai Chi forms emphasizing trunk rotation, weight shifting, coordination, and narrowing of lower-extremity stance were taught twice weekly. WE program participants met once a week and received lectures focused on health. Main outcome measures The COP was recorded during gait initiation both before and after the 48-week intervention by using a forceplate sampling at 300 Hz. The COP trajectory was divided into 3 periods (S1, S2, S3

2004 Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1338. Effects of tai chi mind-body movement therapy on functional status and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure: a randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

Effects of tai chi mind-body movement therapy on functional status and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure: a randomized controlled trial. To examine the effects of a 12-week tai chi program on quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with heart failure.Thirty patients with chronic stable heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction < or =40% (mean [+/- SD] age, 64 +/- 13 years; mean baseline ejection fraction, 23% +/- 7%; median New York Heart Association (...) class, 2 [range, 1 to 4]) were randomly assigned to receive usual care (n = 15), which included pharmacologic therapy and dietary and exercise counseling, or 12 weeks of tai chi training (n = 15) in addition to usual care. Tai chi training consisted of a 1-hour class held twice weekly. Primary outcomes included quality of life and exercise capacity. Secondary outcomes included serum B-type natriuretic peptide and plasma catecholamine levels. For 3 control patients with missing data items at 12 weeks

2004 The American journal of medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1339. Tai Chi Chuan practice in community-dwelling persons after stroke. (Abstract)

Tai Chi Chuan practice in community-dwelling persons after stroke. Eighteen community-dwelling first-stroke survivors, aged 45 to 65, underwent following examinations: Romberg's Test, standing on the unaffected leg, Emory Fractional Ambulation Profile, the Berg Balance Test, the Timed 'Up and Go' Test and the Duke Health Profile. They were then randomly divided into two matched groups of 9 subjects each. The study group (SG) received Tai Chi exercises and the control group (CG) physiotherapy (...) exercises focused on improvement of balance, both groups for 1 h twice weekly for 12 weeks. On completion of exercises, SG subjects showed improvement in social and general functioning whereas CG subjects showed improvement in balance and speed of walking. It is concluded that there are potential and no adverse effects in Tai Chi practice in stroke survivors.

2004 International journal of rehabilitation research. Internationale Zeitschrift für Rehabilitationsforschung. Revue internationale de recherches de réadaptation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1340. Tai Chi: improving functional balance and predicting subsequent falls in older persons. (Abstract)

Tai Chi: improving functional balance and predicting subsequent falls in older persons. To determine whether improved functional balance through a Tai Chi intervention is related to subsequent reductions in falls among elderly persons.Two hundred fifty-six healthy, physically inactive older adults aged 70-92 (mean age +/- SD = 77.48 +/- 4.95), recruited from a local health system in Portland, OR, participated in a 6-month randomized controlled trial, with allocation to Tai Chi or exercise (...) procedures.Tai Chi participants who showed improvements in measures of functional balance at the intervention endpoint significantly reduced their risk of falls during the 6-month postintervention period, compared with those in the control condition (odds ratio (OR), 0.27, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07-0.96 for Berg balance scale; OR, 0.27, 95% CI, 0.09-0.87 for dynamic gait index; OR, 0.20, 95% CI, 0.05-0.82 for functional reach).Improved functional balance through Tai Chi training is associated

2004 Medicine and science in sports and exercise Controlled trial quality: predicted high

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