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Tai Chi

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1. Tai Chi for rheumatoid arthritis. (Abstract)

Tai Chi for rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease that results in joint deformity and immobility of the musculoskeletal system. The major goals of treatment are to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, slow down or stop joint damage, prevent disability, and preserve or improve the person's sense of well-being and ability to function. Tai Chi, interchangeably known as Tai Chi Chuan, is an ancient Chinese health-promoting martial art (...) form that has been recognized in China as an effective arthritis therapy for centuries. This is an update of a review published in 2004.To assess the benefits and harms of Tai Chi as a treatment for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).We updated the search of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and clinical trial registries from 2002 to September 2018.We selected randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials examining the benefits (ACR improvement criteria or pain, disease progression

2019 Cochrane

2. Children and Adults Tai Chi Study (CF-CATS2): a randomised controlled feasibility study comparing internet-delivered with face-to-face Tai Chi lessons in cystic fibrosis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Children and Adults Tai Chi Study (CF-CATS2): a randomised controlled feasibility study comparing internet-delivered with face-to-face Tai Chi lessons in cystic fibrosis. Virtual healthcare is fast entering medical practice. Research into the feasibility of using it to teach treatment regimens such as exercise has not been explored. Maintaining an exercise regime can be difficult in cystic fibrosis: group classes risk potential infection, yet motivation is hard to maintain when alone. Tai Chi (...) is a low-impact exercise and involves gentle, demanding movements. This study aimed to assess the feasibility, safety and acceptability of learning Tai Chi via an internet-based approach and compared patient-reported outcomes. Children and adults with cystic fibrosis were recruited to a randomised, comparative effectiveness trial. Participants learnt eight Tai Chi movements; teaching was delivered in eight lessons over 3 months: delivered either via the internet or face-to-face. Assessments were at 3

2018 ERJ open research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3. Adult nursing: Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension

Adult nursing: Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension | Evidence-Based Nursing Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension Article Text Commentary Adult nursing Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing

4. Superior Effects of Modified Chen-Style Tai Chi versus 24-Style Tai Chi on Cognitive Function, Fitness, and Balance Performance in Adults over 55. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Superior Effects of Modified Chen-Style Tai Chi versus 24-Style Tai Chi on Cognitive Function, Fitness, and Balance Performance in Adults over 55. Cognitive decline and balance impairment are prevalent in the aging population. Previous studies investigated the beneficial effects of 24-style Tai Chi (TC-24) on either cognitive function or balance performance of older adults. It still remains largely unknown whether modified Chen-style TC (MTC) that includes 18 complex movements is more (...) beneficial for these age-related health outcomes, as compared to TC-24.We investigated if MTC would show greater effects than TC-24 on global cognitive function and balance-related outcomes among older adults.We conducted a randomized trial where 80 eligible adults aged over 55 were allocated into two different styles of Tai Chi (TC) arms (sixty-minute session × three times per week, 12 weeks). Outcome assessments were performed at three time periods (baseline, Week 6, and Week 12) and included

2019 Brain sciences Controlled trial quality: uncertain

5. A randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of tai chi alongside usual care with usual care alone on the postural balance of community-dwelling people with dementia: protocol for the TACIT trial (TAi ChI for people with demenTia). Full Text available with Trip Pro

A randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of tai chi alongside usual care with usual care alone on the postural balance of community-dwelling people with dementia: protocol for the TACIT trial (TAi ChI for people with demenTia). Falls are a public health issue for the older adult population and more so for people with dementia (PWD). Compared with their cognitively intact peers, PWD are at higher risk of falls and injurious falls. This randomised controlled trial aims to test (...) the clinical and cost effectiveness of Tai Chi to improve postural balance among community-dwelling PWD and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive trial to reduce the incidence of falls among PWD.A 3-centre parallel group randomised controlled trial with embedded process evaluation. One hundred and fifty community-dwelling dyads of a person with dementia and their informal carer will be recruited and assessed at baseline and at six-month follow-up. Dyads will be randomised in a 1:1

2018 BMC Geriatrics Controlled trial quality: predicted high

6. Effects of Tai Chi on partial anterior cruciate ligament injury: A single-blind, randomized-controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effects of Tai Chi on partial anterior cruciate ligament injury: A single-blind, randomized-controlled trial. This study aims to investigate the effects of Tai Chi (TC) exercises on muscle strength, pain, proprioception, and knee function in patients with partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries.Between March 2017 and January 2018, a total of 58 patients with partial ACL injuries (30 male, 28 female; mean age 25.5±6.4; range, 18 to 36 years) were included in the study. The patients

2019 Turkish journal of physical medicine and rehabilitation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7. A walk on water: comparing the influence of Ai Chi and Tai Chi on fall risk and verbal working memory in ageing people with intellectual disabilities - a randomised controlled trial. (Abstract)

A walk on water: comparing the influence of Ai Chi and Tai Chi on fall risk and verbal working memory in ageing people with intellectual disabilities - a randomised controlled trial. Aquatic motor intervention has been found to be effective in reducing falls and improving verbal working memory among the general population. However, effects among older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have never been explored. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of aquatic motor (...) intervention on fall risk and verbal working memory among older adults with ID.Forty-one older adults with mild to moderate ID (age: 50-66 years) were randomly assigned to 14 weeks of aquatic motor intervention (Ai Chi: N = 19) or identical on-land motor intervention (Tai Chi: N = 22). Fall risk, measured with the Tinetti balance assessment tool (TBAT), and verbal working memory, measured with the digit span forward test, were assessed pre-intervention, after 7 weeks of intervention and post

2019 Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR Controlled trial quality: uncertain

8. A mixed methods study of Tai Chi exercise for patients with chronic heart failure aged 70 years and older Full Text available with Trip Pro

A mixed methods study of Tai Chi exercise for patients with chronic heart failure aged 70 years and older This study aimed to evaluate Tai Chi group training among patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) aged 70 years and older.Physical activity is recommended for CHF treatment. Tai Chi is found to be beneficial to different patient groups, although few studies focus on older patients with CHF.A mixed methods study. Participants were randomly assigned to Tai Chi training twice a week for 16 (...)  weeks (N = 25) or control (N = 20). Quantitative data were collected at baseline, at the end of the training period and 6 months after training, assessing self-rated fatigue and quality of life, natriuretic peptides and physical performance. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with participants (N = 10) in the Tai Chi training group.No statistical differences between the Tai Chi training group and the control group in quality of life or natriuretic peptides was found. After 16 weeks

2018 Nursing open Controlled trial quality: uncertain

9. Protocol for the MATCH Study: Mindfulness And Tai Chi for Cancer Health: A Preference-Based Multi-Site Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial (CET) of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) vs. Tai Chi/Qigong (TCQ) for Cancer Survivors Full Text available with Trip Pro

Protocol for the MATCH Study: Mindfulness And Tai Chi for Cancer Health: A Preference-Based Multi-Site Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial (CET) of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) vs. Tai Chi/Qigong (TCQ) for Cancer Survivors A growing number of cancer survivors suffer high levels of distress, depression and stress, as well as sleep disturbance, pain and fatigue. Two different mind-body interventions helpful for treating these problems are Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR (...) ) and Tai Chi/Qigong (TCQ). However, while both interventions show efficacy compared to usual care, they have never been evaluated in the same study or directly compared. This study will be the first to incorporate innovative design features including patient choice while evaluating two interventions to treat distressed cancer survivors. It will also allow for secondary analyses of which program best targets specific symptoms in particular groups of survivors, based on preferences and baseline

2017 Contemporary clinical trials Controlled trial quality: uncertain

10. Tai Chi exercise is more effective than brisk walking in reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with hypertension: A randomised controlled trial (Abstract)

Tai Chi exercise is more effective than brisk walking in reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with hypertension: A randomised controlled trial Physical inactivity is a major modifiable lifestyle risk factor associated with cardiovascular disease. Tai Chi is a safe and popular form of physical activity among older adults, yet direct comparisons are lacking between Tai Chi and brisk walking in their ability to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors and improve (...) psychosocial well-being.246 adults (mean age = 64.4 ± 9.8 years, age range = 30-91 years, 45.5% men) with hypertension and at least two but not more than three modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors (diabetes, dyslipidaemia, overweight, physical inactivity and smoking) were randomly assigned to either Tai Chi (n = 82), brisk walking (n = 82) or control (n = 82) groups. The Tai Chi and brisk walking groups engaged in moderate-intensity physical activity 150 min/week for 3 months; daily home-based

2018 EvidenceUpdates

11. The effect of Tai Chi training on the dual-tasking performance of stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial (Abstract)

The effect of Tai Chi training on the dual-tasking performance of stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial To compare the effect of Tai Chi training with conventional exercise on dual-tasking performance among stroke survivors.An assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial.Community-dwelling stroke survivors.Community centers and university.Subjects in the Tai Chi group and the conventional exercise group were trained with the corresponding exercises for 12 weeks (1 hour/session, 2 (...) /week). No training was given to the controls.An auditory Stroop test, a turning-while-walking test, and a dual-tasking condition that combined the two tests were conducted at baseline, after the intervention, and one month later.Forty-seven subjects were randomized into Tai Chi group ( n = 15), conventional exercise group ( n = 17), or control group ( n = 15). There was no significant difference in the outcome measures among the three groups after the intervention and at the one month follow-up

2018 EvidenceUpdates

12. Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial. To determine the effectiveness of tai chi interventions compared with aerobic exercise, a current core standard treatment in patients with fibromyalgia, and to test whether the effectiveness of tai chi depends on its dosage or duration.Prospective, randomized, 52 week, single blind comparative effectiveness trial.Urban tertiary care academic hospital in the United States between (...) March 2012 and September 2016.226 adults with fibromyalgia (as defined by the American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 criteria) were included in the intention to treat analyses: 151 were assigned to one of four tai chi groups and 75 to an aerobic exercise group.Participants were randomly assigned to either supervised aerobic exercise (24 weeks, twice weekly) or one of four classic Yang style supervised tai chi interventions (12 or 24 weeks, once or twice weekly). Participants were followed

2018 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

13. Tai Chi and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Compared for Treatment-Naive Patients With COPD: A Randomized Controlled Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai Chi and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Compared for Treatment-Naive Patients With COPD: A Randomized Controlled Trial In COPD, functional status is improved by pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) but requires specific facilities. Tai Chi, which combines psychological treatment and physical exercise and requires no special equipment, is widely practiced in China and is becoming increasingly popular in the rest of the world. We hypothesized that Tai Chi is equivalent (ie, difference less than ±4 St (...) . George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ] points) to PR.A total of 120 patients (mean FEV1, 1.11 ± 0.42 L; 43.6% predicted) bronchodilator-naive patients were studied. Two weeks after starting indacaterol 150 μg once daily, they randomly received either standard PR thrice weekly or group Tai Chi five times weekly, for 12 weeks. The primary end point was change in SGRQ prior to and following the exercise intervention; measurements were also made 12 weeks after the end of the intervention.The between

2018 EvidenceUpdates

14. The Tai Chi training for middle-aged and elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis: A protocol for systematic review and meta analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Tai Chi training for middle-aged and elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis: A protocol for systematic review and meta analysis. Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a disabling joint disease with an increasingly prevalence among the older individuals. Tai Chi, one of the ancient meditative movements, has been recognized to have clinical benefits for KOA. We aim to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tai Chi for patients with KOA through this systematic review.Five English databases (Cochrane (...) . The randomized controlled trials of Tai Chi training for patients with KOA will be included. The primary outcome will be assessed according to the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Meta-analysis will be conducted with the use of RevMan 5.3. The specific process will refer to the Cochrane Handbook 5.1 for Systematic Review.High-quality synthesis of current evidence on the efficacy and safety of Tai Chi training for KOA will be provided in this study.This systematic review

2020 Medicine

15. Effect of Tai Chi on psychological disorder in college students: A protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Tai Chi on psychological disorder in college students: A protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis. This study will explore the effect of Tai Chi on psychological disorder (PD) in college students (CS).A comprehensive literature search of relevant randomized controlled trials will be carried out in electronic databases from inception to the February 29, 2020: PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and China National Knowledge (...) Infrastructure. There are not limitations related to the language and publication time. Study quality will be assessed by Cochrane risk of bias tool, and evidence quality will be appraised by the grading of recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation approach. RevMan 5.3 software will be exploited to perform statistical analysis.The protocol of this proposed study will investigate the effect of Tai Chi on PD in CS.The findings of this study will provide helpful evidence for clinical practice

2020 Medicine

16. Tai chi for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. (Abstract)

Tai chi for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Stress and a sedentary lifestyle are major determinants of cardiovascular disease (CVD). As tai chi involves exercise and can help in stress reduction, it may be effective in the primary prevention of CVD.To determine the effectiveness of tai chi for the primary prevention of CVD.We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 11, 2013); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1946 to November (...) and reference lists of reviews for further studies. We applied no language restrictions.Randomised controlled trials of tai chi lasting at least three months involving healthy adults or adults at high risk of CVD. The comparison group was no intervention or minimal intervention. The outcomes of interest were CVD clinical events and CVD risk factors. We excluded trials involving multifactorial lifestyle interventions or focusing on weight loss to avoid confounding.Two review authors independently selected

2014 Cochrane

17. Evidence Map of Tai Chi

Evidence Map of Tai Chi Management Briefs eBrief-no90 -- Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no90 -- Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 90 » Issue 90 February 2015 Evidence Map of Tai Chi Many Veterans desire complementary and alternative medicine or integrative medicine modalities, both for treatment and for the promotion of wellness. Tai (...) Chi was developed as an ancient Chinese martial art and, today, is widely practiced for its health benefits. Results from a national survey conducted on a representative sample of adults in the U.S. estimate that approximately 2.3 million adults had practiced Tai Chi in the past 12 months. Many forms of Tai Chi exist, but in Western culture, it is most commonly taught as a series of slow, gentle, low-impact movements that integrate the breath, mind, and physical activity to achieve greater

2015 Veterans Affairs - R&D

18. Evidence Map of Tai Chi

Evidence Map of Tai Chi Evidence-based Synthesis Program Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research & Development Service September 2014 4 Prepared for: Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration Quality Enhancement Research Initiative Health Services Research & Development Service Washington, DC 20420 Prepared by: Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) Center West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Los Angeles, CA Paul G. Shekelle, MD, PhD, Director Principal (...) Investigators: Susanne Hempel, PhD Paul G. Shekelle, MD, PhD Co-Investigator: Stephanie L. Taylor, PhD Michele R. Solloway, PhD Research Associates: Isomi M. Miake-Lye, BA Jessica M. Beroes, BS Roberta Shanman, MS Evidence Map of Tai Chii Evidence Map of Tai Chi Evidence-based Synthesis Program PREFACE Quality Enhancement Research Initiative’s (QUERI) Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) was established to provide timely and accurate syntheses of targeted healthcare topics of particular importance

2014 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

19. Effects of Tai Chi therapy on body mass index and physical index of intellectual disability. (Abstract)

Effects of Tai Chi therapy on body mass index and physical index of intellectual disability. Continuous program development and application are necessary in order to manage the health and address the problems of secondary metabolic disorders for people with intellectual disabilities. This study examines the effects of Tai Chi therapy on body mass index (BMI) and physical index among people with intellectual disabilities.A quasi-experimental study using a pretest-post-test control group, non (...) -synchronized design was employed. Samples were in total 104 people with intellectual disabilities (experimental: n = 67, control: n = 37) in two facilities in South Korea. They were randomly allocated using a coin toss into the two groups. Tai Chi therapy as an experimental intervention was the Sun style Tai Chi exercise, which consists of the warm-up (5 min), main exercise (45 min), and finishing (meditation, 10 min). Tai Chi therapy was conducted twice a week for a total of 40 sessions for 5 months (1

2019 Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS Controlled trial quality: uncertain

20. Evaluation of quality of life and static balance in postmenopausal osteoporosis women after Tai Chi Chuan practice: an observational randomized case control study. (Abstract)

Evaluation of quality of life and static balance in postmenopausal osteoporosis women after Tai Chi Chuan practice: an observational randomized case control study. Post-menopausal osteoporosis women are at increased risk for skeletal fractures with higher mortality and lower quality of life. Some studies have reported fall risk reduction in the elderly after Tai chi practice. Tai chi is a weight bearing mind-body exercise that has been reported to positively influence bone mineral density (...) and improve postural control in different pathologies. The aim of this observational randomized case control study is to evaluate the effect of Tai chi on balance and quality of life in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. A total of 98 postmenopausal osteoporosis women, aged 70.6±8.2 years (mean and standard deviation), (mean T-score of the hip and spine were-2.9± 0.92 and -2.8±1.08), have been recruited in outpatients University Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Hospital between June 2016

2019 Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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