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126 results for

Syrup of Ipecac

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121. Home syrup of ipecac use does not reduce emergency department use or improve outcome. (PubMed)

Home syrup of ipecac use does not reduce emergency department use or improve outcome. The usefulness of syrup of ipecac as a home treatment for poisoning and the need to keep it in the home has been increasingly challenged. Many poison centers do not recommend any use of syrup of ipecac.To determine if use of syrup of ipecac in children at home is associated with reduced utilization of emergency department (ED) resources or improved outcome after unintended exposure to a pharmaceutical.Cohort (...) comparison.American Association of Poison Control Centers' Toxic Exposure Surveillance System Database.Blinded data for each of the 64 US poison centers included ED referral recommendation rate, actual rate of ED use, actual home use of syrup of ipecac, and outcome. These data were derived from cases in 2000 and 2001 involving children <6 years of age who unintentionally ingested a pharmaceutical agent and in which the call to a poison center came from home (752 602 children).Correlation between rate of home use

2003 Pediatrics

122. Antiemetic efficacy of smoked marijuana: subjective and behavioral effects on nausea induced by syrup of ipecac. (PubMed)

Antiemetic efficacy of smoked marijuana: subjective and behavioral effects on nausea induced by syrup of ipecac. Although the public debate about the legalization of marijuana has continued for as long as 25 years, few controlled studies have been conducted to assess its potential medical benefits. The present study examined the antiemetic effect of smoked marijuana cigarettes (8.4 and 16.9 mg Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]) compared to a highly potent antiemetic drug, ondansetron (8 mg (...) ) in 13 healthy volunteers. Nausea and emesis were induced by syrup of ipecac. Marijuana significantly reduced ratings of "queasiness" and slightly reduced the incidence of vomiting compared to placebo. Ondansetron completely eliminated the emetic effects of ipecac. These findings support and extend previous results, indicating that smoked marijuana reduces feelings of nausea and also reduces emesis in this model. However, its effects are very modest relative to ondansetron, and the psychoactive

2001 Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior

123. Preserving the emetic effect of syrup of ipecac with concurrent activated charcoal administration: a preliminary study. (PubMed)

Preserving the emetic effect of syrup of ipecac with concurrent activated charcoal administration: a preliminary study. Activated charcoal is reported to block the emetic effect of syrup of ipecac. Therefore, activated charcoal administration is commonly delayed until syrup of ipecac induced emesis is complete. The advantages of early administration of activated charcoal have been well documented. Preservation of the emetic effect of syrup of ipecac in the presence of activated charcoal may (...) produce a synergistic effect by enhancing toxin elimination. A study was conducted in ten human volunteers to determine if activated charcoal prevents the emetic effect of syrup of ipecac when a temporal separation exists between administration of the two substances. Syrup of ipecac 60 ml plus water 480 ml was administered via an 18 French nasogastric tube followed by an aqueous slurry of activated charcoal 50 g five minutes later. Eight (80%) of the subjects had emesis in a mean time of 20.25 minutes

1986 Journal of toxicology. Clinical toxicology

124. Comparison of activated charcoal and ipecac syrup in prevention of drug absorption. (PubMed)

Comparison of activated charcoal and ipecac syrup in prevention of drug absorption. The efficacy of activated charcoal and ipecac syrup in the prevention of drug absorption was studied in 6 healthy adult volunteers, using a randomized, cross-over design. Paracetamol 1000 mg, tetracycline 500 mg and aminophylline 350 mg were ingested on an empty stomach with 100 ml water. Then, after 5 or 30 min, the subjects ingested, either activated charcoal suspension (50 g charcoal), syrup of ipecac (...) , or, only after 5 min, water 300 ml. Activated charcoal, given either after 5 or 30 min, significantly (p less than 0.01 or less 0.05) reduced the absorption of these 3 drugs measured, for example as AUC0-24 h. Syrup of ipecac caused emesis on each occasion, with a mean delay of 15 min. When ipecac was given 5 min after the drugs, its effect on absorption was significant, but when it was given after 30 min only the absorption of tetracycline was reduced. Activated charcoal was significantly (p less than

1983 European journal of clinical pharmacology

125. Activated charcoal and syrup of ipecac in prevention of cimetidine and pindolol absorption in man after administration of metoclopramide as an antiemetic agent. (PubMed)

Activated charcoal and syrup of ipecac in prevention of cimetidine and pindolol absorption in man after administration of metoclopramide as an antiemetic agent. The effects of activated charcoal and ipecac syrup by mouth on cimetidine and pindolol absorption were studied in seven subjects, who had ingested 20 mg metoclopramide 1 h earlier, and compared with the adsorption capacity of charcoal in vitro. Activated charcoal, 50 g, given 5 min after 400 mg cimetidine + 10 mg pindolol, reduced (...) their absorption by 99% or more, based on AUC0-48h and the 48-h urinary excretion of the drugs. Syrup of ipecac caused emesis on each occasion. On the average, ipecac reduced the absorption of cimetidine and pindolol by 75% and 60%, respectively. Based on studies in vitro it seems probable that the adsorbing capacity of charcoal for cimetidine but not for pindolol will be saturated if 50 g charcoal is given after an overdose of about 100 fold the therapeutic dose. Because the use of ipecac allowed

1984 Journal of toxicology. Clinical toxicology

126. Myopathy due to ipecac syrup poisoning in a patient with anorexia nervosa. (PubMed)

Myopathy due to ipecac syrup poisoning in a patient with anorexia nervosa. 6116535 1981 12 21 2018 11 13 0008-4409 125 5 1981 Sep 01 Canadian Medical Association journal Can Med Assoc J Myopathy due to ipecac syrup poisoning in a patient with anorexia nervosa. 453-4 Brotman M C MC Forbath N N Garfinkel P E PE Humphrey J G JG eng Case Reports Journal Article Canada Can Med Assoc J 0414110 0008-4409 8012-96-2 Ipecac AIM IM Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa complications Cardiomyopathies chemically (...) induced Female Humans Ipecac poisoning Muscular Diseases chemically induced 1981 9 1 1981 9 1 0 1 1981 9 1 0 0 ppublish 6116535 PMC1862452 Acta Sociomed Scand. 1971;3(1):17-26 5134873 Br Heart J. 1974 Jul;36(7):719-23 4413202 Br J Psychiatry. 1976 Jun;128:549-54 1276563 Adv Cardiol. 1977;19:280-2 835430 Clin Toxicol. 1977;10(2):221-42 15766 Cardiology. 1978;63(1):1-4 618586 Am J Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;137(3):377-8 7356072 JAMA. 1980 May 16;243(19):1927-8 6102612 Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1980 Sep;37(9):1036

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1981 Canadian Medical Association Journal

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