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Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test

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1. Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test

Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Sweet 16 Cognitive (...) Screening Test Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test Aka: Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test II. Criteria Three minute recall Orientation (8 items) Backward digital span III. Scoring One point for each correct item Maximum score: 16 IV. Interpretation Score <14 suggests V. Efficacy : 80% : 70% Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website

2018 FP Notebook

2. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Genetic Testing for Reproductive Carrier Screening and Prenatal Diagnosis

15 Revision History 16 PROPRIETARY Guidelines developed by, and used with permission from, Informed Medical Decisions, Inc. © 2019 Informed Medical Decisions, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 3 Scope This document addresses genetic testing in the reproductive setting, including both testing of parents (carrier screening) and testing of fetal or embryonic DNA (prenatal diagnosis, preimplantation genetic testing, cell-free DNA). All tests listed in these guidelines may not require prior authorization (...) Decisions, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 16 3 Brezina PR, Anchan R, Kearns WG. Preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy: what technology should you use and what are the differences? J Assist Reprod Genet. 2016 Jul;33(7):823-32. Epub 2016 Jun 14. PubMed PMID: 27299602. 4 Debrock S, Melotte C, Spiessens C, et al. Preimplantation genetic screening for aneuploidy of embryos after in vitro fertilization in women aged at least 35 years: a prospective randomized trial. Fertil Steril. 2010 Feb;93(2):364-73

2019 AIM Specialty Health

3. Screening of fetal aneuploidies whereby non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT)

Screening of fetal aneuploidies whereby non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) Dec2015 © EUnetHTA, 2015. Reproduction is authorised provided EUnetHTA is explicitly acknowledged 1 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 Version 1.5, 23 rd February 2018 Rapid assessment of other technologies using the HTA Core Model ® for Rapid Relative Effectiveness Assessment SCREENING OF FETAL TRISOMIES 21, 18 AND 13 BY NONINVASIVE PRENATAL TESTING Project ID: OTCA03 Screening of fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13 by noninvasive (...) Cunqueiro Hospital, Spain, who had undergone NIPT participated in the draft project plan consultation phase. Screening of fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13 by noninvasive prenatal testing Version 1.5, 23rd February 2018 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 3 Consultation of the draft rapid assessment Manufacturers [v 1.2] (factual accuracy check) Sequenom Laboratories, San Diego, CA, USA Ariosa Diagnostics Inc./Roche Sequencing Solutions Inc., San Jose, California, USA Natera ® , San Carlos, CA, USA Premaitha Health

2018 EUnetHTA

4. Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults

In Username or Email * Password * Remember Me Don't have an account? The AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC, guideline.gov) Web site will not be available after July 16, 2018 because federal funding through AHRQ will no longer be available to support the NGC as of that date. For additional information, read our . Guideline Synthesis Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults Guidelines Being Compared: Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) Recommendations on screening (...) is insufficient, clinicians should remain alert to early signs or symptoms of cognitive impairment (for example, problems with memory or language) and evaluate as appropriate. The National Institute on Aging has information on the detection and management of cognitive impairment for patients and clinicians, including a database of tools to detect cognitive impairment (available at ). Screening Tests Screening tests for cognitive impairment in the clinical setting generally include asking patients to perform

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

5. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management

Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management Strok Stroke and tr e and transient ischaemic attack in ansient ischaemic attack in o ov ver 16s: diagnosis and initial er 16s: diagnosis and initial management management NICE guideline Published: 1 May 2019 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng128 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility (...) and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management (NG128) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

6. Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test

Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Sweet 16 Cognitive (...) Screening Test Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test Aka: Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test II. Criteria Three minute recall Orientation (8 items) Backward digital span III. Scoring One point for each correct item Maximum score: 16 IV. Interpretation Score <14 suggests V. Efficacy : 80% : 70% Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Sweet 16 Cognitive Screening Test." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website

2015 FP Notebook

7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in over 16s: diagnosis and management

the results of a reversibility test performed on different occasions can be inconsistent and not reproducible Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in over 16s: diagnosis and management (NG115) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 9 of 65over-reliance on a single reversibility test may be misleading unless the change in FEV1 is greater than 400 ml the definition of the magnitude of a significant change (...) obstructive pulmonary disease in over 16s: diagnosis and management (NG115) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 11 of 65exercise capacity (for example, 6-minute walk test) TLCO whether the person meets the criteria for long-term oxygen therapy and/or home non- invasive ventilation multimorbidity frailty. [2010, amended 2018] [2010, amended 2018] T o find out why the committee made the recommendations

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

8. Recommendations on screening for cognitive impairment in older adults

of mild cognitive impair- ment does not produce clinically meaningful benefit. Thus, the accuracy of potential screening tools was less important for determining an over- all recommendation, but it was still important to understand the likely burden of false-positive results if screening were to be implemented. As such, a systematic review of the evidence on diagnostic test properties was not conducted. Instead, two recent high-quality systematic reviews 11,16 (AMSTAR [A Measurement Tool to Assess (...) (AMSTAR score of 9), reported a sensitivity of 88% (95% CI 81% to 93%) and a specificity of 86% (95% CI 82% to 90%) for MMSE at cut-off scores of 23/24 or 24/25 to detect dementia. Test performance to detect mild cognitive impairment was based on a smaller body of literature. A recent meta-analysis, 16 also rated as having high methodologic quality (AMSTAR score of 10), reported pooled estimates across 108 studies (n = 36 080) of 81% sensitivity (95% CI 78% to 84%) and 89% specificity (95% CI 87

2015 CPG Infobase

9. Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with a Cerebrovascular Accident or Traumatic Brain Injury

with cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury. Additional references of potential interest are provided in the appendix. OVERALL SUMMARY OF FINDINGS The systematic review 1 identified a lack of evidence regarding the diagnostic accuracy of tests for executive function in adults with acquired brain injury. The authors concluded that better quality evidence is needed regarding tests of executive function. 1 The 30 non-randomized studies examined various cognitive screening instruments for several different (...) impairment = 84% (N = 124) Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with a CVA or TBI 2 Table 2: Summary of Included Non-Randomized Studies Author and Year Patient Population Tests Used Findings Cog-4 Patients classified with cognitive impairment = 37% (N = 62) Sensitivity = 0.36 Specificity = 0.96 PPV = 0.98 NPV = 0.23 Redfors, 2014 4 N = 281 MMSE Patients classified with cognitive impairment = 65% BNIS Patients classified with cognitive impairment = 89% Webb, 2014 5 N

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

10. Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with Dementia

= 95.7% Specificity = 87.5% Greater accuracy than ACE and MMSE Quinn, 2014 3 10 studies; N = 2644; 379 with dementia Community setting IQCODE; threshold 3.3 Clinical diagnosis Sensitivity = 0.80 Specificity = 0.84 PLR = 5.2 NLR = 0.23 Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with Dementia 2 Table 2: Summary of Included Studies First Author and Year Patient Population Index Test(s) Comparator(s) or Reference Standard Findings Yokomizo, 2014 4 13 studies 34 cognitive (...) accuracy than MMSE. AUROC = 0.934 vs. 0.772 Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with Dementia 5 Table 2: Summary of Included Studies First Author and Year Patient Population Index Test(s) Comparator(s) or Reference Standard Findings Fuchs, 2012 26 N = 423 Visual Association Test Clinical diagnosis Sensitivity = 95.2% Specificity = 96.0% PPV = 55.6% NPV = 99.7% Mini-Cog, CDT, verbal fluency, episodic memory, and subjective complaints Mini-Cog and immediate and delayed

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

11. Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with a Neurological Impairment: Diagnostic Accuracy

Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with a Neurological Impairment 8 PubMed: PM22763350 26. Chen R, Xiong KP, Huang JY, Lian YX, Jin F, Li ZH, et al. Neurocognitive impairment in Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome. Respirology. 2011 Jul;16(5):842-8. PubMed: PM21507144 27. Olson RA, Iverson GL, Carolan H, Parkinson M, Brooks BL, McKenzie M. Prospective comparison of two cognitive screening tests: diagnostic accuracy and correlation (...) systematic reviews, one randomized controlled trial, and 25 non-randomized studies were identified regarding diagnostic accuracy of screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with a neurological impairment. No health technology assessments were identified. Additional references of potential interest are provided in the appendix. OVERALL SUMMARY OF FINDINGS One systematic review 1 compared tests for cognitive impairment in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

12. Diagnostic accuracy of new and old cognitive screening tools for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. (PubMed)

Diagnostic accuracy of new and old cognitive screening tools for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Considering the similarities between HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and neurodegenerative dementias and the frequency of executive dysfunctions among HIV-positive patients, we evaluated the accuracy of the Frontal Assessment Battery and Clock-Drawing Test together with the Three Questions Test and International HIV Dementia Scale to screen for HAND.A cross-sectional (...) monocentric study was conducted from 2010 to 2017. The index tests were represented by the four screening tools; the reference standard was represented by a comprehensive neurocognitive battery used to investigate 10 cognitive domains. Patients were screened by a trained infectious diseases physician and those showing International HIV Dementia Scale scores ≤ 10 and/or complaining of neurocognitive symptoms were then evaluated by a trained neuropsychologist.A total of 650 patients were screened and 281

2018 HIV medicine

13. Technical report: ethical and policy issues in genetic testing and screening of children

Technical report: ethical and policy issues in genetic testing and screening of children 234 ACMG PoliCy St AteMent © American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics INTRODUCTION Two major events occurred in the 1950s that forever changed the influence of genetics in medicine: Watson and Crick 1 described the double-helix model of DNA structure in 1953, and in 1956 Tjio and Levan 2 established that the typical human carries 46 chromosomes. The goal of mapping and sequencing the human genome (...) began in 1990, and a working draft was presented in 2000, with a more complete edition published in 2003. 3 Knowledge of genetics and genomics continues to grow rapidly, as does consumer interest in genetic testing. As a result, statements about genetic testing and screening of children in the United States written in the past two decades need to be updated to consider the ethical issues that arise with the new technologies and expanded uses of genetic testing and screen- ing. 4,5 The growing

2013 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

14. Effects of Sweetness on Neurocognitive Responses, Glycemia and Food Intake

will be ingested as single test agents in randomized order. Water will be used as a control for gastric distension and non-sweet, whereas maltodextrin will be used as a non-sweet control for carbohydrate content. Participants will be asked to attend a screening visit at the Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit of the University of Manchester on a morning after overnight fast. Participants' weight and height, fasting blood glucose and blood pressure will be measured. This will be followed by some questionnaires (...) on the relationship between NNS intake, obesity and cardiometabolic risk. Caloric sugars have a differing effect on physiological responses compared to NNS. However it is almost wholly unknown how NNS consumption affects eating behaviour and cognitive processes. This study compares the performance on food related neurocognitive tasks following the consumption of the test preloads on 5 visits. In particular, sucrose, glucose, maltodextrin, water or a natural high potency sweetener from leaf extract

2018 Clinical Trials

15. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning Key Points • Regular use refers to weekly or more frequent cannabis use over a period of months to years. Regular cannabis use is associated with mild cognitive difficulties, which are typically not apparent following about one month of abstinence. Heavy (daily) and long-term cannabis use is related to more noticeable cognitive impairment. • Cannabis use beginning prior to the age of 16 or 17 is one of the strongest (...) difficulties is more likely to be present among individuals who initiated regular cannabis use early in life (e.g., prior to the age of 16) (Dahlgren et al., 2016; Gruber et al., 2012). Although there is research in humans and animals supporting a causal effect of chronic cannabis use on inhibition deficits (Irimia, Polis, Stouffer, & Parsons, 2015; Morin et al., 2018), it is also possible that 4 Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive FunctioningThe brain produces its own natural

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

16. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning Key Points • Regular use refers to weekly or more frequent cannabis use over a period of months to years. Regular cannabis use is associated with mild cognitive difficulties, which are typically not apparent following about one month of abstinence. Heavy (daily) and long-term cannabis use is related to more noticeable cognitive impairment. • Cannabis use beginning prior to the age of 16 or 17 is one of the strongest (...) difficulties is more likely to be present among individuals who initiated regular cannabis use early in life (e.g., prior to the age of 16) (Dahlgren et al., 2016; Gruber et al., 2012). Although there is research in humans and animals supporting a causal effect of chronic cannabis use on inhibition deficits (Irimia, Polis, Stouffer, & Parsons, 2015; Morin et al., 2018), it is also possible that 4 Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive FunctioningThe brain produces its own natural

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

17. The MMSE and MoCA for Screening Cognitive Impairment in Less Educated Patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PubMed)

The MMSE and MoCA for Screening Cognitive Impairment in Less Educated Patients with Parkinson’s Disease To explore whether the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) can be used to screen for dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in less educated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).We reviewed the medical records of PD patients who had taken the Korean MMSE (K-MMSE), Korean MoCA (K-MoCA), and comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Predictive (...) ; K-MoCA < 7 for illiterate, < 13 for 0.5-3 years, < 16 for 4-6 years, < 19 for 7-9 years, < 20 for 10 years or more) and MCI (K-MMSE < 19 for illiterate, < 26 for 0.5-3 years, < 27 for 4-6 years, < 28 for 7-9 years, and < 29 for 10 years or more; K-MoCA < 13 for illiterate, < 21 for 0.5-3 years, < 23 for 4-6 years, < 25 for 7-9 years, < 26 for 10 years or more).Both MMSE and MoCA can be used to screen for dementia in patients with PD, regardless of educational level; however, neither test

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2016 Journal of movement disorders

18. Screening and Management of Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

tests. The obstetrician–gynecologist should be aware of risk factors and comorbidities associated with bleeding disorders. Medical History When obtaining a medical history, it is important to identify risk factors for bleeding disorders as well as medical conditions that would alter management. See for a recommended screening tool for adolescent patients who report heavy menstrual bleeding. Adolescents who meet the criteria detailed in Box 1 should undergo laboratory screening for a bleeding (...) lost with every 1 mL of blood. The incidence of iron deficiency among these adolescents is 9%, increasing to 15–20% when iron deficiency without anemia is included (16, ). Despite known adverse effects, there remains a paucity of data regarding optimal screening, diagnosis, and treatment of anemia for adolescents. This lack of evidence on which to base clinical decision making leads to variability in practice and suboptimal management ( , ). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

19. Automated tests for diagnosing and monitoring cognitive impairment: a diagnostic accuracy review. (PubMed)

and abstracts of these were screened and 399 articles were shortlisted for full-text assessment. Sixteen studies were included in the diagnostic accuracy review. No studies were eligible for inclusion in the review of tools for monitoring progressive disease. Eleven automated computerised tests were assessed in the 16 included studies. The overall quality of the studies was good; however, the wide range of tests assessed and the non-standardised reporting of diagnostic accuracy outcomes meant (...) Automated tests for diagnosing and monitoring cognitive impairment: a diagnostic accuracy review. Cognitive impairment is a growing public health concern, and is one of the most distinctive characteristics of all dementias. The timely recognition of dementia syndromes can be beneficial, as some causes of dementia are treatable and are fully or partially reversible. Several automated cognitive assessment tools for assessing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early dementia are now available

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2016 Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)

20. Screen-based activities and children and young people’s mental health and psychosocial wellbeing: a systematic map of reviews

Screen-based activities and children and young people’s mental health and psychosocial wellbeing: a systematic map of reviews Screen-based activities and children and young people’s mental health and psychosocial wellbeing: a systematic map of reviews Department of Health Reviews Facility To support national policy development and implementation The Department of Health Reviews Facility is a collaboration between the following centres of excellence Dickson K, Richardson M, Kwan I, MacDowall W (...) Care Mental Health policy team was consulted to understand the context of the issue under study, and collaborated on the development of the research question(s) and focus of the review. Conflicts of interest There were no conflicts of interest in the writing of this report. This report should be cited as: Dickson K 1 , Richardson M 1, , Kwan I 1 , MacDowall W 2 , Burchett H 2 , Stansfield C 1 , Brunton G 1 , Sutcliffe K 1, Thomas J 1 (2018) Screen-based activities and children and young people’s

2018 EPPI Centre

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