How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

201 results for

Subungual Melanoma

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

141. Pyogenic Granuloma (Lobular Capillary Hemangioma) (Diagnosis)

(pyogenic granuloma) causing severe anemia. Arch Dermatol . 1972 Jul. 106(1):128. . Azzopardi EA, Xuereb CB, Iyer S. Pyogenic granuloma as a surrogate indicator of deep seated foreign bodies: a case report. Cases J . 2009 Aug 5. 2:7354. . . Lee J, Sinno H, Tahiri Y, Gilardino MS. Treatment options for cutaneous pyogenic granulomas: a review. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg . 2011 Sep. 64(9):1216-20. . Piraccini BM, Bellavista S, Misciali C, Tosti A, de Berker D, Richert B. Periungual and subungual (...) , Schwarz M, Gin D. Multiple periungual pyogenic granulomas following systemic 5-fluorouracil. Australas J Dermatol . 2006 May. 47(2):130-3. . Piguet V, Borradori L. Pyogenic granuloma-like lesions during capecitabine therapy. Br J Dermatol . 2002 Dec. 147(6):1270-2. . Freiman A, Bouganim N, O'Brien EA. Case reports: mitozantrone-induced onycholysis associated with subungual abscesses, paronychia, and pyogenic granuloma. J Drugs Dermatol . 2005 Jul-Aug. 4(4):490-2. . Devillers C, Vanhooteghem O

2014 eMedicine.com

142. Paronychia (Diagnosis)

: Bacterial, mycobacterial, or viral infection Metastatic cancer Subungual melanoma Squamous cell carcinoma Therefore, benign and malignant neoplasms should always be excluded when chronic paronychia does not respond to conventional treatment. Chronic paronychia most often occurs in persons whose hands are repeatedly exposed to moist environments or in those who have prolonged and repeated contact with irritants such as mild acids, mild alkalis, or other chemicals. People who are most susceptible include (...) . . Dahdah MJ, Scher RK. Nail diseases related to nail cosmetics. Dermatol Clin . 2006 Apr. 24(2):233-9, vii. . Yip KM, Lam SL, Shee BW, Shun CT, Yang RS. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma: report of 2 cases. J Formos Med Assoc . 2000 Aug. 99(8):646-9. . Daniel CR 3rd. Paronychia. Dermatol Clin . 1985 Jul. 3(3):461-4. . Jules KT, Bonar PL. Nail infections. Clin Podiatr Med Surg . 1989 Apr. 6(2):403-16. . Muñiz AE, Evans T. Chronic paronychia, osteomyelitis, and paravertebral abscess in a child

2014 eMedicine.com

143. Keratosis Palmaris et Plantaris (Diagnosis)

psoriasislike plaques or lichenoid patches may be present on the knees and the elbows. Patients may have severe hyperhidrosis, possibly accompanied by malodor. Secondary bacterial and fungal infections are common. Perioral erythema; periorbital erythema and hyperkeratosis; nail changes (eg, koilonychia, subungual hyperkeratosis); and lingua plicata, syndactyly, hair on the palms and the soles, high-arched palate, and left-handedness are other clinical features. Histologic findings include orthokeratosis (...) on the affected genes. Onset occurs in the first year of life. Clinically, PPK begins focally in infancy and then becomes diffuse and severe. Later findings include flexion deformities and constriction of the digits, sometimes leading to spontaneous amputation. Progressive, well-defined perioral, perianal, and perineal hyperkeratotic plaques are present, as is onychodystrophy. Alopecia, deafness, nail dystrophy, and dental loss may be associated. Squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma have developed

2014 eMedicine.com

144. Paraneoplastic Diseases (Diagnosis)

include symmetrical, scaly, violaceous plaques on the acral surfaces, with severe forms progressing to bullae. The lesions predominantly occur on the hands, feet, ear helices, nose tip, and scalp. Skin changes may spread to involve the knees, elbows, and malar surface of the face. [ ] Bazex syndrome occurs more commonly in men older than 40 years. [ ] Alopecia and nail changes are common and can be early findings. Subungual hyperkeratosis, onychodystrophy, and white flaking of the nail surface (...) diagnosis of EMPD includes Bowen disease, amelanotic superficial spreading malignant melanoma, and eczematous dermatitis. Clinical course and prognosis Skin lesions slowly increase in size. Over time, the lesions may progress from pruritic to painful, and they may become ulcerated. Regional lymph nodes may become involved. The general course of the disease depends on the presence of an underlying internal cancer. EMPD patients have a 5-year survival rate of 72-85%. Patients with EMPD without an internal

2014 eMedicine.com

145. Onychomatricoma (Diagnosis)

Author: Annie Wester, MD, MS; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Onychomatricoma Overview Background An onychomatricoma is a subungual tumor of the fingers and toes, described in 1992. [ ] The terminology describing onychomatricomas has slowly been adjusted over time. In 1992, the original description termed this tumor an onychomatrixoma, based on the description of a filamentous, tufted tumor in the matrix. Subsequently, the term onychomatricoma (...) with fibrokeratoma of the nailbed. Am J Dermatopathol . 2001 Feb. 23(1):36-40. . DiMaio DJ, Cohen PR. Trichilemmal horn: case presentation and literature review. J Am Acad Dermatol . 1998 Aug. 39(2 Pt 2):368-71. . Yasuki Y. Acquired periungual fibrokeratoma--a proposal for classification of periungual fibrous lesions. J Dermatol . 1985 Aug. 12(4):349-56. . Baran R, Perrin C. Bowen's disease clinically simulating an onychomatricoma. J Am Acad Dermatol . 2002 Dec. 47(6):947-9. . Patel MR, Desai S. Subungual

2014 eMedicine.com

146. Hand, Tumors: Benign

. [ ] Leiomyosarcoma In a recent report by Fu et al, a leiomyosarcoma of the cephalic vein was described. [ ] The report states that leiomyosarcomas of veins develop 5 times more frequently in veins than in arteries. [ ] Previous Next: Conclusion Importantly, recognize systemic processes that cause benign lesions of the hand. These can include , , and xanthomatosis from . Additional tumors of the hand include carpometacarpal bossing, anomalous extensor manus brevis muscle, or extensor . Subungual melanomas may (...) with salicylates. [ ] Physical findings of a glomus tumor include painful subcutaneous nodules in the subungual region. [ ] As many as 75% of glomus tumors are found in the hand, and up to 65% of these lesions are found in the fingertip. [ ] The pain associated with glomus tumors may be elicited by light touch or cold exposure. [ ] Bluish discoloration in the nail beds, with or without nail plate ridges, may be associated with the presence of a glomus tumor. [ ] Imaging of glomus tumors includes MRI, which

2014 eMedicine Surgery

147. Hand, Tumors: Malignant

pigmented lesion under the nail plate with no previous history of trauma requires a biopsy because of the possibility of a subungual melanoma. This usually affects the thumb or the great toe. Survival is related to the thickness of the lesion (in mm) (Breslow thickness; also see ) in malignant melanoma without metastasis. Breslow classification has 4 groups. Tumors in group 1 have a depth of invasion of less than 0.76 mm. Group 2 tumors have a depth of invasion of 0.76 to 1.5 mm. Those in group 3 have (...) a depth of invasion of 1.51 to 4 mm. Group 4 tumors have a depth of invasion greater than 4 mm. Because of the close proximity of the nail matrix to the distal phalanx, this system is not reliable for subungual melanoma. The optimal management of melanoma requires a multidisciplinary approach. The principal treatment is surgical excision or amputation, especially in subungual melanoma. The tumor thickness is used to determine the surgical margins. For in situ lesions, a 5-mm margin is adequate

2014 eMedicine Surgery

148. Hand Infections (Diagnosis)

at risk include those repeatedly exposed to water and/or irritants as well as those who are immunocompromised. Metastatic cancer, subungual melanoma, and may rarely present as chronic paronychia. Felon The distal palmar phalanx is compartmentalized by tangentially oriented fibrous septa. These septa result in a closed compartment at the distal phalanx, which helps prevent the proximal spread of infection. Infection is typically due to direct inoculation of bacteria by penetrating trauma but may (...) to superficial trauma (eg, hangnails, nail biting, manicuring, finger sucking). Artificial nails have also been associated with acute paronychia. Although paronychia typically starts as a cellulitis, its progression to abscess formation is not uncommon. Infection that spreads to the proximal nail edge is termed an eponychia. Occasionally, infection can spread under the nail plate itself, resulting in a subungual abscess. Chronic paronychia resembles acute paronychia but is usually nonsuppurative. People

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

149. Paronychia (Diagnosis)

: Bacterial, mycobacterial, or viral infection Metastatic cancer Subungual melanoma Squamous cell carcinoma Therefore, benign and malignant neoplasms should always be excluded when chronic paronychia does not respond to conventional treatment. Chronic paronychia most often occurs in persons whose hands are repeatedly exposed to moist environments or in those who have prolonged and repeated contact with irritants such as mild acids, mild alkalis, or other chemicals. People who are most susceptible include (...) . . Dahdah MJ, Scher RK. Nail diseases related to nail cosmetics. Dermatol Clin . 2006 Apr. 24(2):233-9, vii. . Yip KM, Lam SL, Shee BW, Shun CT, Yang RS. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma: report of 2 cases. J Formos Med Assoc . 2000 Aug. 99(8):646-9. . Daniel CR 3rd. Paronychia. Dermatol Clin . 1985 Jul. 3(3):461-4. . Jules KT, Bonar PL. Nail infections. Clin Podiatr Med Surg . 1989 Apr. 6(2):403-16. . Muñiz AE, Evans T. Chronic paronychia, osteomyelitis, and paravertebral abscess in a child

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

150. Hand Infections (Overview)

at risk include those repeatedly exposed to water and/or irritants as well as those who are immunocompromised. Metastatic cancer, subungual melanoma, and may rarely present as chronic paronychia. Felon The distal palmar phalanx is compartmentalized by tangentially oriented fibrous septa. These septa result in a closed compartment at the distal phalanx, which helps prevent the proximal spread of infection. Infection is typically due to direct inoculation of bacteria by penetrating trauma but may (...) to superficial trauma (eg, hangnails, nail biting, manicuring, finger sucking). Artificial nails have also been associated with acute paronychia. Although paronychia typically starts as a cellulitis, its progression to abscess formation is not uncommon. Infection that spreads to the proximal nail edge is termed an eponychia. Occasionally, infection can spread under the nail plate itself, resulting in a subungual abscess. Chronic paronychia resembles acute paronychia but is usually nonsuppurative. People

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

151. Paronychia (Overview)

: Bacterial, mycobacterial, or viral infection Metastatic cancer Subungual melanoma Squamous cell carcinoma Therefore, benign and malignant neoplasms should always be excluded when chronic paronychia does not respond to conventional treatment. Chronic paronychia most often occurs in persons whose hands are repeatedly exposed to moist environments or in those who have prolonged and repeated contact with irritants such as mild acids, mild alkalis, or other chemicals. People who are most susceptible include (...) . . Dahdah MJ, Scher RK. Nail diseases related to nail cosmetics. Dermatol Clin . 2006 Apr. 24(2):233-9, vii. . Yip KM, Lam SL, Shee BW, Shun CT, Yang RS. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma: report of 2 cases. J Formos Med Assoc . 2000 Aug. 99(8):646-9. . Daniel CR 3rd. Paronychia. Dermatol Clin . 1985 Jul. 3(3):461-4. . Jules KT, Bonar PL. Nail infections. Clin Podiatr Med Surg . 1989 Apr. 6(2):403-16. . Muñiz AE, Evans T. Chronic paronychia, osteomyelitis, and paravertebral abscess in a child

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

152. Paronychia (Follow-up)

: Bacterial, mycobacterial, or viral infection Metastatic cancer Subungual melanoma Squamous cell carcinoma Therefore, benign and malignant neoplasms should always be excluded when chronic paronychia does not respond to conventional treatment. Chronic paronychia most often occurs in persons whose hands are repeatedly exposed to moist environments or in those who have prolonged and repeated contact with irritants such as mild acids, mild alkalis, or other chemicals. People who are most susceptible include (...) . . Dahdah MJ, Scher RK. Nail diseases related to nail cosmetics. Dermatol Clin . 2006 Apr. 24(2):233-9, vii. . Yip KM, Lam SL, Shee BW, Shun CT, Yang RS. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma: report of 2 cases. J Formos Med Assoc . 2000 Aug. 99(8):646-9. . Daniel CR 3rd. Paronychia. Dermatol Clin . 1985 Jul. 3(3):461-4. . Jules KT, Bonar PL. Nail infections. Clin Podiatr Med Surg . 1989 Apr. 6(2):403-16. . Muñiz AE, Evans T. Chronic paronychia, osteomyelitis, and paravertebral abscess in a child

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

153. Paronychia - acute

one finger. Typical features include: Pain and swelling at the base of the fingernail. Localized pain and tenderness of the nail folds. Red, tender, and swollen lateral and/or proximal nail folds often with a visible collection of pus. Conditions that may resemble paronychia include cutaneous candidiasis, acute contact dermatitis, staphylococcal whitlow, finger-tip injuries, insect bites, fungal nail infections, herpetic whitlow, cancer (for example melanoma or squamous cell carcinoma), psoriasis (...) and tenderness of the nail folds. Acute paronychia usually affects one finger. There may be a history of trauma to the nail 2 to 5 days earlier. Examine the person. The lateral and/or proximal nail folds are red, tender, and swollen, and a visible collection of pus may be present. In more severe cases, there may be: Extension to the proximal nail edge (eponychium), and abscess formation with fluctuance. Abscess formation is less common in young children. Extension under the nail plate to form a subungual

2011 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

154. Fungal melanonychia. (PubMed)

Fungal melanonychia. Fungal melanonychia is a relatively rare nail disorder caused by nail infection that produces brown-to-black pigmentation of the nail unit. The number of organisms implicated as etiologic agents of fungal melanonychia is increasing, and the list currently tops 21 species of dematiaceous fungi and at least 8 species of nondematiaceous fungi. These superficial infections may clinically mimic subungual melanoma and are often not responsive to traditional antifungal therapy

2012 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

155. Skin Cancer in Skin of Color

(SCC) Ethnicities with SCC as most common skin cancer Native Americans Black patients Peak at ages 40-49 Especially common in scars, chronic ulcers and lesions Ethnicities with SCC as second most common skin cancer Chinese and Japanese (peaks after age 60 years old) Hispanic patients Common presenting locations in Non-sun-exposed areas (e.g. legs, anogenital, scalp) IV. Approach: Melanoma Patients with present with at a later, more advanced stage with worse outcomes about risk and is important (...) Common presenting locations in Non-sun-exposed sites Mucous membranes Palmar, plantar and subungual ( ) more common in asian and black patients V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Skin Cancer in Skin of Color." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Hematology and Oncology About FPnotebook.com

2015 FP Notebook

156. One Ulcer and Two Nodules on the Foot: A Quiz. (Full text)

One Ulcer and Two Nodules on the Foot: A Quiz. 22565305 2013 05 28 2013 01 10 1651-2057 93 1 2013 Jan Acta dermato-venereologica Acta Derm. Venereol. One ulcer and two nodules on the foot: a quiz. Diagnosis: Subungual ulcerative amelanotic nail apparatus melanoma with giant nodular pigmented satellite metastases. 124-5 10.2340/00015555-1337 Girgenti Valentina V Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Dermatological Sciences, University of Milan, I.R.C.C.S. Foundation, Cà Granda (...) Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, via Pace 9, IT-20122 Milan, Italy. E-mail: valentinagirgenti@hotmail.com. Balice Ylenia Y Cavicchini Stefano S Fiorani Roberta R Gianotti Raffaele R Veraldi Stefano S eng Case Reports Journal Article Sweden Acta Derm Venereol 0370310 0001-5555 IM Aged Humans Male Melanoma secondary Melanoma, Amelanotic pathology Nail Diseases pathology Skin Neoplasms pathology secondary 2012 5 9 6 0 2012 5 9 6 0 2013 5 29 6 0 ppublish 22565305 10.2340/00015555-1337

2012 Acta Dermato-Venereologica PubMed

157. Longitudinal Melonychia: Clinical Evaluation and Biopsy Technique. (PubMed)

Longitudinal Melonychia: Clinical Evaluation and Biopsy Technique. Longitudinal melonychia is a brown streaking of the nailbed. It is often benign but can be a subungual melanoma. Subungual melanoma is a rare malignancy. Diagnosis is often delayed, resulting in a higher staging and poorer prognosis than other cutaneous melanomas. We provide an update on the evaluation of longitudinal melonychia and biopsy technique.Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published

2011 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

158. Longitudinal erythronychia: individual or multiple linear red bands of the nail plate: a review of clinical features and associated conditions. (PubMed)

band), type Ib (monodactylous - bifid bands), type IIa (polydactylous - single band), and type IIb (polydactylous - multiple bands). Associated morphologic findings that can be present at the distal tip of the nail with longitudinal erythronychia include fragility, onycholysis, splinter hemorrhage, splitting, subungual keratosis, thinning, and V-shaped nick. Some patients with longitudinal erythronychia seek medical evaluation because of pain in the associated distal digit; however, the linear red (...) nail plate dyschromia is often asymptomatic and the individual is concerned about the cosmetic appearance or distal nail fragility. Longitudinal erythronychia can be a clinical manifestation of an underlying local or systemic condition. Benign tumors (glomus tumor, onychopapilloma, and warty dyskeratoma), malignant neoplasms (malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma), and other conditions (hemiplegia and postsurgical scar) can be associated with monodactylous longitudinal erythronychia

2011 American journal of clinical dermatology

159. Guidelines for topical photodynamic therapy

of skin cancer possibly related to PDT have previ- ously been reported in the original guidelines. 64,219 One was a melanoma arising in the scalp of a patient receiving PDT for AK, the other an SCC arising in an area of erythroplasia of Queyrat treated by PDT. In the past 5 years, only one further lesion possibly induced by topical PDT has been reported, in a patient who developed a keratoacanthoma after ALA-PDT for treatment of AK. 220 Topical PDT has a low risk of carcinogenicity and reported cases (...) , Collins S et al. Guidelines for topical photo- dynamic therapy: report of a workshop of the British Photoder- matology Group. Br J Dermatol 2002; 146:552–67. 2 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. IPG155. Photodynamic Therapy for Non-Melanoma Skin Tumours (Including Premalignant and Primary Non-Metastatic Skin Lesions). 2006. Available at: http:// www.nice.org.uk/page.aspx?o=IPG155guidance (last accessed 29 August 2008). 3 Peng Q, Soler AM, Warloe T et al. Selective distribution

2008 British Association of Dermatologists

160. Nail Deformities and Dystrophies

activities that might lead to repetitive low-level trauma. Melanonychia striata Acral-Lentiginous Melanoma Image courtesy of Carl Washington, MD and Mona Saraiya, MD, MPH via the Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Melanonychia striata are hyperpigmented bands that are longitudinal and extend from the proximal nail fold and cuticle to the free distal end of the nail plate. In dark-skinned people, these bands may be a normal physiologic variant requiring (...) no treatment. Other causes include trauma, pregnancy, Addison disease, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, and the use of certain drugs, including doxorubicin, 5- fluorouracil , zidovudine , and psoralens. Hyperpigmented bands can also occur in benign melanocytic nevi and malignant melanoma. Hutchinson sign (extension of hyperpigmentation through the lunula and cuticle and into the proximal nail fold) may signal a melanoma in the nail matrix. Rapid biopsy and treatment are essential. Onychogryphosis

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>