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Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

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13881. Oral retinoid use reduces cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma risk in patients with psoriasis treated with psoralen-UVA: a nested cohort study. (Abstract)

Oral retinoid use reduces cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma risk in patients with psoriasis treated with psoralen-UVA: a nested cohort study. Small open studies of patients at high risk for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin suggest that oral retinoid use reduces the risk of these tumors. Among patients at lower risk, randomized trials of low doses of retinoids did not demonstrate significant chemopreventive effects. Patients with psoriasis treated with oral psoralen-UVA have a high risk (...) of SCC development. Oral retinoids are used to treat psoriasis. We performed a nested cohort study to assess whether oral retinoids reduce skin cancer risk among patients with psoriasis exposed to psoralen-UVA.From 1985 to 2000, 135 patients (11.3% of surviving patients in our cohort) used retinoids for at least 26 weeks in 1 year or more. For these 135 patients, we compared each person's SCC and basal cell carcinoma incidence during years of substantial oral retinoid use and other years. We used

2003 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

13882. Pseudo-fibrokeratoma: an unusual presentation of subungual squamous cell carcinoma in a young girl. (Abstract)

Pseudo-fibrokeratoma: an unusual presentation of subungual squamous cell carcinoma in a young girl. An interesting case of subungueal squamous cell carcinoma in a 13-year-old girl is presented. The tumor presented as a pseudo-fibrokeratoma with melanonychia on the index finger. Biopsy was diagnostic and treatment consisted of Mohs micrographic surgery and secondary intention wound healing. This is one of the youngest patients ever reported with subungueal squamous cell carcinoma (...) , and there is only one more case of pseudo-fibrokeratoma and melanonychia reported as initial skin lesions.

2003 Dermatologic Surgery

13883. Squamous cell carcinoma of the legs in African Americans. (Abstract)

Squamous cell carcinoma of the legs in African Americans. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common skin cancer in African Americans, but its incidence is low. Although incompletely described in the literature, an increased incidence of SCC in sun-protected areas in black patients has been reported.This study was conducted to better define the incidence, characteristics, and cutaneous markers of SCC occurring on the legs in African Americans.We did a 5-year retrospective chart review

2002 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

13884. Squamous cell carcinoma in chronic lymphedema: case report and review of the literature. (Abstract)

Squamous cell carcinoma in chronic lymphedema: case report and review of the literature. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising in chronic lymphedema is rare; only nine cases have been reported.To present the evolution of SCC in chronic lymphedema.Case report and literature review.The tumor was treated by wide excision and covered by a skin graft.In most of the other reported SCC cases in lymphedema, there are additional factors for carcinogenesis. There is no additional carcinogenic factor

2002 Dermatologic Surgery

13885. Management of squamous cell carcinoma in organ transplant recipients. (Abstract)

Management of squamous cell carcinoma in organ transplant recipients. The number of skin cancers continues to rise with well over one million cases of skin cancer expected in the United States this year. Optimal management depends on early detection and treatment. The consequences of skin cancer may be particularly devastating in organ transplant recipients. In this article, management of squamous cell carcinoma in the organ transplant recipient is discussed.

2003 Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery

13886. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa complicated by cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and pulmonary and renal amyloidosis. (Abstract)

anaemia, sideropaenia, hypocalcaemia, heavy proteinuria and hypoalbuminaemia. A rapidly growing skin squamous cell carcinoma developed on the neck that spread to axillary and cervical lymph nodes. Recurrent hypocalcaemic tetanic convulsions and dyspnoea and a pneumonia refractory to antibiotics led to the premature demise of the patient. Autopsy revealed extensive amyloidosis of the renal, hepatic and splenic tissues. AA type amyloid deposits were detected in the renal glomeruli and in the lung (...) Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa complicated by cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and pulmonary and renal amyloidosis. A 25-year-old woman with Hallopeau-Siemens recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa had generalized blistering, scarring and milia since birth. In the course of the disease, acral pseudosyndactyly developed, and the patient suffered from corneal erosions, oesophageal strictures, malabsorption, recurrent severe pneumonias and nephrotic syndrome. In addition, she had severe

2003 Clinical & Experimental Dermatology

13887. Actinic keratosis: epidemiology and progression to squamous cell carcinoma. (Abstract)

Actinic keratosis: epidemiology and progression to squamous cell carcinoma. Actinic keratoses are a common problem in the population, and one of the most common conditions treated by dermatologists. Risk factors for the development of actinic keratosis are those associated with increased sun exposure and increased susceptibility to sun exposure such as low latitude, working outdoors, light skin, and history of sunburn. The role of the immune system is clear from the frequency of actinic (...) keratoses in transplant patients. There is strong evidence that actinic keratoses can progress to squamous cell carcinoma, underscoring the need to identify and treat patients at risk.

2003 British Journal of Dermatology

13888. Squamous cell carcinoma developing in a 12-year-old boy with nonHallopeau-Siemens recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. (Abstract)

Squamous cell carcinoma developing in a 12-year-old boy with nonHallopeau-Siemens recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. We report a 12-year-old boy with nonHallopeau-Siemens recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (nHS-RDEB) who developed two skin lesions of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on the left foot. The incidence of SCC in nHS-RDEB is much lower than in the HS-RDEB subtype. Furthermore, this boy is the youngest among 92 previously described patients with DEB to develop SCC

2003 British Journal of Dermatology

13889. Lichen sclerosus is frequently present in penile squamous cell carcinomas but is not always associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus. (Abstract)

Lichen sclerosus is frequently present in penile squamous cell carcinomas but is not always associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus. Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) may occur on pre-existing lesions of lichen sclerosus (LS). However, the prevalence of histological changes of LS in penile SCC is not well established. Moreover, mucosal oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are sometimes detected in penile SCC, but have not been systematically sought in LS-associated penile SCC.To (...) establish the prevalence of LS histological changes and of mucosal oncogenic HPV in a series of patients with penile SCC.Consecutive cases of histologically proven penile SCC from a single university hospital over a 14-year period were retrospectively selected and reviewed. Histological signs of LS were systematically sought. HPV was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA from paraffin-embedded skin samples using general primers GP5+/GP6+ (allowing detection of mucosal HPV

2003 British Journal of Dermatology

13890. Evidence for the association of human papillomavirus infection and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in immunocompetent individuals. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evidence for the association of human papillomavirus infection and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in immunocompetent individuals. The aim of our study was to evaluate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a risk factor for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in immunocompetent individuals.Hospital-based case-control study.Referral center for dermatologic diseases for central and southern Italy.Consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cutaneous SCC (n = 46) and control (...) by a dermatologist.Positive serologic findings for HPV type 8 were associated with SCC (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-7.9) independently of other risk factors, whereas positive serologic findings for HPV type 15 were negatively associated with SCC (odds ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval, 0.2-0.9). Other variables significantly associated with the tumor were family history of skin cancer, professional or recreational sun exposure, light eye color, high number of solar keratoses and seborrheic keratoses

2003 Archives of Dermatology

13891. Keratin synthesis in normal mouse epithelia and in squamous cell carcinomas: evidence in tumors for masked mRNA species coding for high molecular weight keratin polypeptides. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Keratin synthesis in normal mouse epithelia and in squamous cell carcinomas: evidence in tumors for masked mRNA species coding for high molecular weight keratin polypeptides. Transplantable mouse squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), originally derived either from back skin or forestomach epithelium, do not synthesize high molecular weight keratin polypeptides [greater than 60 kilodaltons (kDa)] involved in the process of terminal differentiation in the corresponding normal tissues. The in vivo tumor (...) keratin spectra consist of only low molecular weight keratin subunits at 60, 58, 52, 50, 47, and 46 kDa, each encoded by its own mRNA and encountered also in normal epidermis and forestomach epithelium. In addition, both tumors express a mRNA-dependent 40-kDa protein, whereas a 56-kDa protein and its mRNA are selectively found only in the forestomach tumor. Translation of mRNAs from both tumors in a cell-free system does not only generate analogues of the in vivo tumor keratin polypeptides, but also

1983 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

13892. Hypertrichosis and multiple cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in association with cyclosporin A therapy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hypertrichosis and multiple cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in association with cyclosporin A therapy. 6620282 1983 11 23 2018 11 13 0141-0768 76 9 1983 Sep Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine J R Soc Med Hypertrichosis and multiple cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in association with cyclosporin A therapy. 786-7 Mortimer P S PS Thompson J F JF Dawber R P RP Ryan T J TJ Morris P J PJ eng Case Reports Journal Article England J R Soc Med 7802879 0141-0768 0 Cyclosporins IM Carcinoma (...) , Squamous Cell chemically induced Cyclosporins adverse effects Humans Hypertrichosis chemically induced Male Middle Aged Neoplasms, Multiple Primary chemically induced Skin Neoplasms chemically induced 1983 9 1 1983 9 1 0 1 1983 9 1 0 0 ppublish 6620282 PMC1439415 Agents Actions. 1976 Jul;6(4):468-75 8969 Transplant Proc. 1979 Mar;11(1):1052-4 377609

1983 Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

13893. Human papillomavirus in squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus associated with tylosis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Human papillomavirus in squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus associated with tylosis. Human papillomavirus (HPV) may have a pathogenic role in squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus. Tylosis, an inherited thickening of the skin of the palms and soles, was associated with a high risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus among members of a large family in Liverpool. The resected carcinomas of the oesophagus was examined from four such patients with DNA probes to HPV (...) types 6,11,16,18,31,33 and 35 using in situ hybridisation under conditions of high stringency. No reaction was detected. The oesophageal biopsy specimens from 10 tylotic subjects without carcinoma were also examined. No HPV DNA was detected. It is concluded that there is no evidence that HPV infection has a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus in tylosis.

1993 Journal of Clinical Pathology

13894. HPV type 16 in conjunctival and junctional papilloma, dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma. Full Text available with Trip Pro

HPV type 16 in conjunctival and junctional papilloma, dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma. To clarify the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the development of papilloma, dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell epithelioma arising from the eyelids, including the tunica conjunctiva palpebrum (conjunctiva), its junction to epidemis of eyelid skin (junction), and eyelid skin.Sixteen cases of papilloma, four of dysplasia, four of squamous cell carcinoma, and 12 of basal (...) cell epithelioma were examined using formalin fixed and paraffin embedded samples. Detection of HPV-DNA was performed by PCR-RFLP and in situ hybridisation (ISH) methods.HPV-16 was detected in 12/16 papillomas (75%), 2/4 dysplasias (50%), and 1/4 squamous cell carcinomas (25%) but in none of the basal cell epitheliomas. No other HPV subtypes were found. ISH assay showed positive signals in only two cases of dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma. The mean age of HPV-16 positive dysplasia

1995 Journal of Clinical Pathology

13895. Proliferation indexes--a comparison between cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Carcinoma, Squamous Cell pathology veterinary Cell Cycle physiology Dogs Humans Skin Neoplasms pathology veterinary 1997 4 1 1997 4 1 0 1 1997 4 1 0 0 ppublish 9215161 PMC499895 J Clin Pathol. 1996 Jul;49(7):549-51 8813951 Histopathology. 1990 Dec;17(6):489-503 2076881 (...) Proliferation indexes--a comparison between cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas. 9215161 1997 07 24 2018 11 13 0021-9746 50 4 1997 Apr Journal of clinical pathology J. Clin. Pathol. Proliferation indexes--a comparison between cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas. 355 Maiolino P P de Vico G G eng Comment Letter England J Clin Pathol 0376601 0021-9746 AIM IM J Clin Pathol. 1996 Jul;49(7):549-51 8813951 J Clin Pathol 1997 Jul;50(7):622 Animals Carcinoma, Basal Cell pathology

1997 Journal of Clinical Pathology

13896. Matrix metalloproteinases in tumor progression: focus on basal and squamous cell skin cancer. (Abstract)

, focusing on non-melanoma skin cancers basal (BCC) and squamous (SCC) cell carcinoma, and the possible influence of MMPs in their differences. (...) Matrix metalloproteinases in tumor progression: focus on basal and squamous cell skin cancer. Many normal biological processes, such as reproduction, fetal development and wound healing, are critically dependent on controlled degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules. However, excessive degradation of matrix components occurs in pathologic tissue destruction, e.g. in atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are degradative enzymes

2003 Experimental Dermatology

13897. Benign clonal keratinocyte patches with p53 mutations show no genetic link to synchronous squamous cell precancer or cancer in human skin. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Benign clonal keratinocyte patches with p53 mutations show no genetic link to synchronous squamous cell precancer or cancer in human skin. Ultraviolet light, which is the major etiology of human skin cancer, will cause mutations in the p53 gene. We and others have found that such mutations occur in more than one-half of non-melanoma squamous cell cancer and precancer. Immunostaining for p53 has disclosed a characteristic compact pattern not only in cancer/precancer but also in areas (...) of microscopically normal epidermis termed p53 patches. By microdissection, sequence analysis of the p53 gene, and analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the site of this gene, we have now extended previous data to ascertain whether these p53 patches are precursors of simultaneously present squamous cell cancer or its morphologically recognized precancerous stages (dysplasia, carcinoma in situ). In none of 11 instances with co-existence of a p53 patch with dysplasia or in situ or invasive cancer were

1997 The American journal of pathology

13898. Trends for invasive squamous cell neoplasia of the skin in Norway Full Text available with Trip Pro

Trends for invasive squamous cell neoplasia of the skin in Norway Over the period 1966-1995, based on 11,662 patients, the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin increased three to four times in Norway mainly as a result of an increased number of localized tumours. In men, cancer of the auricle was the second most common site; in women the incidence was low.

1999 British journal of cancer

13899. Accelerated radiation therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx selected according to tumor cell kinetics--a phase II multicenter study. (Abstract)

Accelerated radiation therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx selected according to tumor cell kinetics--a phase II multicenter study. A Phase II multicenter trial testing an accelerated regimen of radiotherapy in locally advanced and inoperable cancers of the head and neck, in patients selected on the basis of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/DNA flow cytometry-derived tumor potential doubling time (Tpot).From September 1992 to September 1993, 23 patients (...) consecutively diagnosed to have locally advanced, inoperable carcinomas of the oral cavity and the oropharynx, with Tpot of < or = 5 days, received an accelerated radiotherapy regimen (AF) based on a modification of the concomitant boost technique: 2 Gy/fraction once a day, delivered 5 days a week up to 26 Gy, followed by 2 Gy/fraction twice a day, with a 6-h interval, one of the two fractions being delivered as a concomitant boost to reduced fields, up to 66 Gy total dose (off-cord reduction at 46 Gy

1996 International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics

13900. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor suppresses telomerase activity in HSC-1 human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cells. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor suppresses telomerase activity in HSC-1 human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cells. Activation of telomerase, which stabilizes the telomere length of chromosomes, is crucial for the continued growth or progression of cancer cells. In a previous study, we showed that telomerase is frequently activated in skin tumors. Because epidermal growth factor plays an important role during the tumorigenesis of epithelial tissue, we have now examined (...) the role of epidermal growth factor signaling in regulating telomerase activity using HSC-1 human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cells. Treatment of HSC-1 cells with AG 1478, an inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, or with a neutralizing antibody to the epidermal growth factor receptor, significantly suppressed their telomerase activity, in association with inhibiting their growth. The suppression of telomerase activity was obvious at day 3 and was maximal at day 5 after treatment

2003 Journal of Investigative Dermatology

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