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Sports Performance Supplement

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1741. Changes in Body Composition and Metabolic Risk Parameters by Life Style Intervention.

: Almased Wellness GmbH Information provided by: University Hospital Freiburg Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Eligible overweight and obese persons will be randomized to one of three controlled groups: 1 group of participants is treated by health education for life style intervention only. The other 2 groups will be included in a dietary program with an individually dosed food supplement (Almased®) for an initial weight reduction for a period of 6 weeks. The following 18 weeks (...) but with the intention to continue the so far practiced change in life style. All participants will be supplied with adequate information and material concerning the desired change in life style. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Obesity Metabolic Syndrome Behavioral: health education Behavioral: food supplementation Behavioral: food supplementation combined with physical activity program Not Applicable Detailed Description: Obese and adipose participants are randomized to three intervention groups

2006 Clinical Trials

1742. Nutrition as a Determinant of Labor Outcome

: This is a randomized, double-blind trial looking at how nutrition intake is associated with labor progress and complications. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Labor, Obstetric Dietary Supplement: Energy-containing soft drink Not Applicable Detailed Description: Insufficient intake of energy during labor may result in poor labor progress. The study investigates the effect of an energy supplement during labor. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (...) (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 200 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) Primary Purpose: Prevention Official Title: Nutrition as Determinant of Labor Outcome Study Start Date : September 2006 Actual Primary Completion Date : October 2008 Actual Study Completion Date : December 2009 Arms and Interventions Go to Intervention Details: Dietary Supplement: Energy-containing soft

2006 Clinical Trials

1743. Creatine-dextrose and protein-dextrose induce similar strength gains during training. (PubMed)

Creatine-dextrose and protein-dextrose induce similar strength gains during training. Creatine supplementation during resistance exercise training has been reported to induce greater increases in fat-free mass (FFM), muscle fiber area, and strength when compared with a placebo. We have recently shown that timing of nutrient delivery in the postexercise period can have positive effects on whole body protein turnover (B. D. Roy et al., Med Sci Sports Exerc. 32(8):1412-1418, 2000).We tested (...) resulted in similar increases in strength after a resistance exercise training program as compared with CR-CHO. However, the greater gains in total mass for the CR-CHO group may have implications for sport-specific performance.

2001 Medicine and science in sports and exercise

1744. Pre-exercise oral creatine ingestion does not improve prolonged intermittent sprint exercise in humans. (PubMed)

Pre-exercise oral creatine ingestion does not improve prolonged intermittent sprint exercise in humans. This investigation determined whether pre-exercise oral Cr ingestion could enhance prolonged intermittent sprint exercise performance.a randomised, double-blind crossover design was employed.testing was performed at the Western Australian Institute of Sport and participants were monitored and treated by both scientific and medical personnel.eight active, but not well-trained males (...) with a background in multiple-sprint based sports acted as subjects for this investigation.subjects ingested either 15 g Cr.H2O or placebo 120 min and 60 min prior to the start of an 80-min maximal sprint cycling task (10 sets of multiple 6-sec sprints with varying active recoveries). Subjects were retested 14 days later, being required to ingest the alternate supplement and repeat the exercise test.performance variables (work done and peak power) were obtained throughout the exercise challenge. Muscle biopsies

2002 The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness

1745. Anabolic steroid use in weightlifters and bodybuilders: an internet survey of drug utilization. (PubMed)

health care concerns that require further study.The survey findings provide sports medicine practitioners a reasonable estimate of the expected drug history among bodybuilders and weightlifters for the use of performance-enhancing agents. (...) Anabolic steroid use in weightlifters and bodybuilders: an internet survey of drug utilization. Dietary supplements and ergogenic agents, including anabolic steroids, are common components of present-day bodybuilder and weightlifter training regimens. Prior reports of anabolic steroid use suggest polypharmacy and high doses of injectable agents.To provide an updated description of anabolic steroid regimens employed by weightlifters and bodybuilders and to determine the extent to which anabolic

2005 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

1746. Dietary antioxidants for the athlete. (PubMed)

Dietary antioxidants for the athlete. Physical exercise induces oxidative stress and tissue damage. Although a basal level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is required to drive redox signaling and numerous physiologic processes, excess ROS during exercise may have adverse implications on health and performance. Antioxidant nutrients may be helpful in that regard. Caution should be exercised against excess antioxidant supplements, however. This article presents a digest for sports practitioners (...) . The following three recommendations are made: 1) it is important to determine the individual antioxidant need of each athlete performing a specific sport; 2) multinutrient preparations, as opposed to megadoses of any single form of nutrient, seem to be a more prudent path to choose; and 3) for outcomes of antioxidant supplementation, performance should not be the only criteria. Overall well being of the athlete, faster recovery, and minimization of injury time could all be affected by antioxidant therapy.

2006 Current Sports Medicine Reports

1747. Arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization of collision and contact athletes. (PubMed)

, SF-36, and Rowe scores. The surgical procedure was performed in a consistent manner: suture anchor repair of the displaced labrum, capsulorrhaphy with suture placement supplemented with thermal treatment of the capsule when indicated, and occasional rotator interval closure. Average follow-up was 37 months (range, 24-66 months).Two of 18 contact and collision athletes (11%) experienced recurrent dislocations after the procedure; both were collision athletes. One returned to play 3 years of high (...) school football but failed after diving into a pool. One patient failed in his second season after his stabilization (>2 years) when making a tackle. None of the contact athletes experienced a recurrent dislocation, with all of them returning to high school or college athletics.One hundred percent of all collision and contact athletes returned to organized high school or college sports. Fifteen percent of those collision athletes had a recurrence, which has not required treatment. Participation

2005 American Journal of Sports Medicine

1748. Putting to rest the myth of creatine supplementation leading to muscle cramps and dehydration. (PubMed)

by media claims and anecdotal reports, that creatine supplementation can result in muscle cramps and dehydration. Although a number of published studies have refuted these claims, a recent position statement by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) in 2000 advised individuals who are managing their weight and exercising intensely or in hot environments to avoid creatine supplementation. Recent reports now suggest that creatine may enhance performance in hot and/or humid conditions (...) Putting to rest the myth of creatine supplementation leading to muscle cramps and dehydration. Creatine is one of the most popular athletic supplements with sales surpassing 400 million dollars in 2004. Due to the popularity and efficacy of creatine supplementation over 200 studies have examined the effects of creatine on athletic performance. Despite the abundance of research suggesting the effectiveness and safety of creatine, a fallacy appears to exist among the general public, driven

2008 British Journal of Sports Medicine

1749. Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects

. Rockville, MD, USA: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment; 76. 2003 Original Paper URL Other publications of related interest Shekelle PG, Hardy ML, Morton SC, Maglione M, Mojica WA, Suttorp MJ, et al. Efficacy and safety of ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance: a meta-analysis. JAMA 2003;289:1537-45. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic; Dietary Supplements /adverse effects (...) Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects Shekelle P, Morton S, Maglione M, Hardy M, Suttorp M, Roth E, Jungvig L, Mojica WA, Gagne J, Rhodes S, McKinnon E CRD summary This review assessed the effectiveness

2003 DARE.

1750. Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects

of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Shekelle P, Morton S, Maglione M. Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 76. 2003 Authors' objectives This report aims to assess the efficacy of herbal ephedra-containing dietary supplements and ephedrine on weight loss and athletic performance, through (...) amounts of weight loss over the short term. There are no data regarding long-term effects on weight loss. Single-dose ephedrine plus caffeine has a modest effect on athletic performance. The available trials do not provide any evidence about ephedrine or ephedra-containing dietary supplements, as they are used by the general population, to enhance athletic performance. Use of ephedra or ephedrine plus caffeine is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal, psychiatric, and autonomic

2003 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

1751. Reviews of evidence on interventions to prevent dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries

of suspicious lesions, pre-cancers or cancers, and cancer morbidity and mortality. The outcomes of interest in the review of population-based interventions to encourage the use of helmets, facemasks and mouthguards in contact sports, were the injury rate (head, neck, face, mouth and teeth) and the use of helmets, facemasks and mouthguards. How were decisions on the relevance of primary studies made? The authors do not state how the papers were selected for the review, or how many of the reviewers performed (...) Reviews of evidence on interventions to prevent dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries Reviews of evidence on interventions to prevent dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries Reviews of evidence on interventions to prevent dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries Truman B I, Gooch B F, Sulemana I, Gift H C, Horowitz A M, Evans C A, Griffin S O, Carande-Kulis V G

2002 DARE.

1752. Effects of induced metabolic alkalosis on prolonged intermittent-sprint performance. (PubMed)

= 0.08), but not first, half of the IST after the ingestion of NaHCO3. Furthermore, subjects completed significantly more work in 7 of 18 second-half, 4-s sprints after NaHCO3 ingestion.The results of this study suggest that NaHCO3 ingestion can improve intermittent-sprint performance and may be a useful supplement for team-sport athletes. (...) Effects of induced metabolic alkalosis on prolonged intermittent-sprint performance. Previous studies have shown that induced metabolic alkalosis, via sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) ingestion, can improve short-term, repeated-sprint ability. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of NaHCO3 ingestion on a prolonged, intermittent-sprint test (IST).Seven female team-sport athletes (mean +/- SD: age = 19 +/- 1 yr, VO2peak = 45.3 +/- 3.1 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered for the study

2005 Medicine and science in sports and exercise

1753. Effects of recovery beverages on glycogen restoration and endurance exercise performance. (PubMed)

Effects of recovery beverages on glycogen restoration and endurance exercise performance. The restorative capacities of a high carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PRO) beverage containing electrolytes and a traditional 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverage (SB) were assessed after glycogen-depleting exercise. Postexercise ingestion of the CHO-PRO beverage, in comparison with the SB, resulted in a 55% greater time to exhaustion during a subsequent exercise bout at 85% maximum oxygen consumption (VO (...) (2)max). The greater recovery after the intake of the CHO-PRO beverage could be because of a greater rate of muscle glycogen storage. Therefore, a second study was designed to investigate the effects of after exercise CHO-PRO and SB supplements on muscle glycogen restoration. Eight endurance-trained cyclists (VO(2)max = 62.1 +/- 2.2 ml.kg(-1) body wt.min(-1)) performed 2 trials consisting of a 2-hour glycogen-depletion ride at 65-75% VO(2)max. Carbohydrate-protein (355 ml; approximately 0.8 g

2003 Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association

1754. Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects. (PubMed)

Journal Article Meta-Analysis United States Evid Rep Technol Assess (Summ) 100890218 1530-440X GN83C131XS Ephedrine IM Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic Dietary Supplements adverse effects analysis Ephedra adverse effects physiology Ephedrine adverse effects therapeutic use Evidence-Based Medicine Humans Risk Assessment Safety Sports physiology Treatment Outcome United States United States Food and Drug Administration Weight Loss drug effects 2003 3 22 4 0 2003 4 4 5 0 2003 3 22 4 0 ppublish (...) Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects. 12647510 2003 04 03 2016 03 23 1530-440X 76 2003 Mar Evidence report/technology assessment (Summary) Evid Rep Technol Assess (Summ) Ephedra and ephedrine for weight loss and athletic performance enhancement: clinical efficacy and side effects. 1-4 Shekelle P P Hardy M L ML Morton S C SC Maglione M M Suttorp M M Roth E E Jungvig L L Mojica W A WA Gagné J J Rhodes S S McKinnon E E eng

2003 Evidence report/technology assessment (Summary)

1755. Effects of high dose oral creatine supplementation on anaerobic capacity of elite wrestlers. (PubMed)

Effects of high dose oral creatine supplementation on anaerobic capacity of elite wrestlers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high dose oral creatine supplementation on anaerobic capacity of elite wrestlers.comparative randomized design.Wingate anaerobic tests of the participants were taken at the Human Performance Laboratory of the Department of Physical Education and Sports in The Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.20 active international level (...) wrestlers participated (22 to 27 years old).the daily dosage of creatine or placebo was divided into 4 equal amounts (5 gx4 = 20 g). Every 5 g of supplement was dissolved in 250 ml water and it was given to participants 1 hour before breakfast, lunch, dinner, and workout session.subjects underwent a 30-s Wingate Anaerobic tests until exhaustion in pre- and post-tests. After the pretest measurements were completed, participants were classified as creatine (Cr., n=10) and placebo (Pl., n=10) groups

2003 The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness

1756. The effects of magnesium supplementation on exercise performance

for practice and research Practice: The authors did not state any implications for practice. Research: The authors stated that little research has focused on physically active females who may be at the highest risk for Mg deficiency. Bibliographic details Newhouse I J, Finstad E W. The effects of magnesium supplementation on exercise performance. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine 2000; 10(3): 195-200 PubMedID Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Cross-Over Studies; Dietary Supplements (...) The effects of magnesium supplementation on exercise performance The effects of magnesium supplementation on exercise performance The effects of magnesium supplementation on exercise performance Newhouse I J, Finstad E W Authors' objectives To critique research that has addressed the effects of magnesium (Mg) supplements on exercise performance in athletes. Searching MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to June 1999. Other electronic sources searched were CINAHL, International Bibliographic

2000 DARE.

1757. Effect of lactate consumption on exercise performance. (PubMed)

Effect of lactate consumption on exercise performance. Maintenance of plasma glucose is important in endurance performance. Gluconeogenesis or carbohydrate ingestion maintain glucose after hepatic glycogen depletion. Lactate may also serve as a gluconeogenic precursor as well as a blood buffer.To determine if an 8% carbohydrate (CHO) sports drink with and without a 2% lactate (L) solution increased endurance performance, peak power, and delayed blood acidosis, seven trained cyclists (...) +/- 331.3 Watts) among drinks. There were no differences in insulin, glucose, pH and HCO3- after the power tests among the drinks.Exercise performance is unaffected by oral supplementation with lactate.

1998 The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness

1758. Effects of zinc supplementation on blood rheology during exercise. (PubMed)

Effects of zinc supplementation on blood rheology during exercise. We previously reported a higher blood viscosity at corrected hematocrit (45%) (explained by a higher value of erythrocyte rigidity) in football players with low serum zinc (Zn) and thus presumably Zn deficiency; subjects with low serum zinc had also an impairment in performance. This interventional study was undertaken in order to assess the effects of zinc supplementation (compared to placebo) on blood rheology and performance (...) either at rest or during exercise. Ten male healthy volunteers (age: 26+/-1.3 yr; weight 67.9+/-2.24 kg; height 177+/-3 cm) received at random order either zinc (20 mg/day) and placebo, according to a double blind cross-over procedure, during seven days. In each case on the eighth day they performed a 25 min submaximal exercise-test. At rest blood viscosity at corrected hematocrit 45% (gamma = 1000 s(-1)) was lower after Zn (3.56+/-0.14 vs. 4.13+/-0.16 mPa.s, p = 0.009), explained by a lower RBC

1999 Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation

1759. [Use of natural vitamin supplements in children during convalescence and in children with athletic activities]. (PubMed)

[Use of natural vitamin supplements in children during convalescence and in children with athletic activities]. Sporting activities and periods of convalescence call for an added intake of nutrients in children. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a natural vitamin supplement on diet, food intake, body composition and muscular strength in children during convalescence and in children practising sports.A comparative study was performed in two different groups of subjects: 20 children aged (...) between 6 and 12 years old during convalescence following infections of upper airways, and 20 9-year-old children forming part of a football team. All subjects were randomly subdivided into two groups who were respectively given a vitamin supplement (Vitality Roeder 2000 Junior) or a placebo for 4 weeks. Weight, body composition using and muscolar strength using dynamometer measured before and after the study and a food diary was kept for 3 days before each visit.No significant differences in body

1999 Minerva pediatrica

1760. Nutritional supplement practices in UK junior national track and field athletes. (PubMed)

in female athletes (75%) was higher than in males (55%) but was not statistically significant. No differences were found for age, training volume, or type of event. Seventeen different supplements were taken, with each athlete using an average of 2.4 products, multivitamins and minerals being the most popular. Reasons for using supplements were for health (45%), to enhance the immune system (40%), and to improve performance (25%). Of all respondents 48% believed they had an average knowledge (...) of supplements, but three quarters felt that they required further information. Those not using supplements were more likely to think supplements were associated with health risks than those taking them (p = 0.03). Most athletes (72%) have access to a sports dietician but underutilise this resource. Coaches (65%) had the greatest influence on supplementation practices, with doctors (25%) and sports dieticians (30%) being less important.Supplementation practices were widespread among the population studied

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2005 British Journal of Sports Medicine

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