How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,599 results for

Spinal Shock

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

161. Spinal Cord Trauma and Related Diseases (Treatment)

, et al. Efficacy and safety of vardenafil in men with erectile dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury. Neurology . 2006 Jan 24. 66(2):210-6. . Atkinson PP, Atkinson JL. Spinal shock. Mayo Clin Proc . 1996 Apr. 71(4):384-9. . Ditunno JF Jr, Formal CS. Chronic spinal cord injury. N Engl J Med . 1994 Feb 24. 330(8):550-6. . Garshick E, Kelley A, Cohen SA, et al. A prospective assessment of mortality in chronic spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord . 2005 Jul. 43(7):408-16. . . Groah SL, Stiens SA (...) Spinal Cord Trauma and Related Diseases (Treatment) Spinal Cord Trauma and Related Diseases Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine.com

162. Spinal Epidural Abscess (Treatment)

is the usual surgical treatment. [ , ] Successful treatment with a combination of abscess aspiration and antibiotic treatment has been reported and seems to be used increasingly. Increasing neurologic deficit, persistent severe pain, or persistent fever and leukocytosis are all indications for decompressive surgery. Patients with spinal epidural abscess may be clinically unstable because of concomitant systemic infection, shock, complications of diabetes mellitus, or other complications. As a result (...) Spinal Epidural Abscess (Treatment) Spinal Epidural Abscess Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTE2NTg0MC10cmVhdG1lbnQ= processing

2014 eMedicine.com

163. Spinal Cord, Topographical and Functional Anatomy (Treatment)

: Classic Spinal Cord Syndromes The classic syndromes of spinal cord injury are described here. In most instances, however, incomplete forms are far more common. Complete spinal cord transection syndrome In the acute phase, the classic syndrome of complete spinal cord transection at the high cervical level consists of the following: Respiratory insufficiency Quadriplegia Upper and lower extremity areflexia Anesthesia below the affected level Neurogenic shock (hypotension without compensatory tachycardia (...) ) Loss of rectal and bladder sphincter tone Urinary and bowel retention leading to abdominal distention, ileus, and delayed gastric emptying This constellation of symptoms is called spinal shock. [ ] (ie, ipsilateral ptosis, miosis, and anhydrosis) is also present with higher lesions because of interruption of the descending sympathetic pathways originating from the hypothalamus. Patients experience problems with temperature regulation because of the sympathetic impairment, which leads to . Lower

2014 eMedicine.com

164. Spinal Orthotics (Treatment)

of the patient's cervical spine is a potential pitfall. Hypotension, hemorrhage, and shock Hypotension may be hemorrhagic and/or neurogenic in acute spinal cord injury. Because of the vital sign confusion in acute spinal cord injury and the high incidence of associated injuries, a diligent search for occult sources of hemorrhage must be made. The most common sources of occult hemorrhage are injuries to the chest, abdomen, and retroperitoneum and fractures of the pelvis or long-bones. Appropriate investigations (...) Spinal Orthotics (Treatment) Spinal Cord Injuries Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Prehospital Management, Emergency Department Management Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine.com

165. Spinal Cord Injury: Definition, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology (Treatment)

of the patient's cervical spine is a potential pitfall. Hypotension, hemorrhage, and shock Hypotension may be hemorrhagic and/or neurogenic in acute spinal cord injury. Because of the vital sign confusion in acute spinal cord injury and the high incidence of associated injuries, a diligent search for occult sources of hemorrhage must be made. The most common sources of occult hemorrhage are injuries to the chest, abdomen, and retroperitoneum and fractures of the pelvis or long-bones. Appropriate investigations (...) Spinal Cord Injury: Definition, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology (Treatment) Spinal Cord Injuries Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Prehospital Management, Emergency Department Management Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine.com

166. Cardiovascular Concerns in Spinal Cord Injury (Treatment)

. Observe the patient for pallor, flushing, sweating, skin temperature, or piloerection (signs of SNS dysfunction). Comprehensive motor and sensory examination can determine the neurologic level and completeness of the injury and may assist with assessing the risk for SNS dysfunction. Reflex testing, especially below the level of injury, can be done to determine whether spinal shock is still present. Examine for peripheral edema and warmth or tenderness of the extremities. Unilateral extremity swelling (...) discharge. Neurorehabil Neural Repair . 2014 Mar-Apr. 28 (3):219-29. . Frisbie JH. Microvascular instability in tetraplegic patients: preliminary observations. Spinal Cord . 2004 May. 42(5):290-3. . Mathias CJ, Christensen NJ, Frankel HL, et al. Cardiovascular control in recently injured tetraplegics in spinal shock. Q J Med . 1979 Apr. 48(190):273-87. . Mathias CJ, Frankel HL. Clinical manifestations of malfunctioning sympathetic mechanisms in tetraplegia. J Auton Nerv Syst . 1983 Mar-Apr. 7(3-4):303

2014 eMedicine.com

167. Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury (Treatment)

. [ ] The occurrence of autonomic dysreflexia increases as the patient evolves out of spinal shock. With the return of sacral reflexes, the possibility of autonomic dysreflexia increases. [ ] Autonomic dysreflexia occurs during labor in approximately two thirds of pregnant women with spinal cord injury above the level of T6. Spinal epidural anesthesia can help reduce the risks of autonomic dysreflexia during pregnancy. The male-to-female ratio for sustaining spinal cord injury is 4:1; however, autonomic (...) Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury (Treatment) Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury: Overview, Pathophysiology, Causes of Autonomic Dysreflexia Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine.com

168. Cardiovascular Concerns in Spinal Cord Injury (Overview)

. Observe the patient for pallor, flushing, sweating, skin temperature, or piloerection (signs of SNS dysfunction). Comprehensive motor and sensory examination can determine the neurologic level and completeness of the injury and may assist with assessing the risk for SNS dysfunction. Reflex testing, especially below the level of injury, can be done to determine whether spinal shock is still present. Examine for peripheral edema and warmth or tenderness of the extremities. Unilateral extremity swelling (...) discharge. Neurorehabil Neural Repair . 2014 Mar-Apr. 28 (3):219-29. . Frisbie JH. Microvascular instability in tetraplegic patients: preliminary observations. Spinal Cord . 2004 May. 42(5):290-3. . Mathias CJ, Christensen NJ, Frankel HL, et al. Cardiovascular control in recently injured tetraplegics in spinal shock. Q J Med . 1979 Apr. 48(190):273-87. . Mathias CJ, Frankel HL. Clinical manifestations of malfunctioning sympathetic mechanisms in tetraplegia. J Auton Nerv Syst . 1983 Mar-Apr. 7(3-4):303

2014 eMedicine.com

169. Spinal Cord Trauma and Related Diseases (Overview)

happens within minutes. The cord fills the whole spinal canal at the injury level and leads to further secondary ischemia. Loss of autoregulation and spinal shock cause systemic hypotension and exacerbate ischemia. Ischemia, toxic metabolic compounds, and electrolyte changes cause a secondary injury cascade. Hypoperfusion of gray matter extends to the surrounding white matter and alters the propagation of action potentials along the axons, contributing to spinal shock. Glutamate is a key element (...) . 40(4):499-519. . Petropoulou KB, Panourias IG, Rapidi CA, Sakas DE. The phenomenon of spasticity: a pathophysiological and clinical introduction to neuromodulation therapies. Acta Neurochir Suppl . 2007. 97:137-44. . Giuliano F, Rubio-Aurioles E, Kennelly M, et al. Efficacy and safety of vardenafil in men with erectile dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury. Neurology . 2006 Jan 24. 66(2):210-6. . Atkinson PP, Atkinson JL. Spinal shock. Mayo Clin Proc . 1996 Apr. 71(4):384-9. . Ditunno JF Jr

2014 eMedicine.com

170. Spinal Cord, Topographical and Functional Anatomy (Overview)

: Classic Spinal Cord Syndromes The classic syndromes of spinal cord injury are described here. In most instances, however, incomplete forms are far more common. Complete spinal cord transection syndrome In the acute phase, the classic syndrome of complete spinal cord transection at the high cervical level consists of the following: Respiratory insufficiency Quadriplegia Upper and lower extremity areflexia Anesthesia below the affected level Neurogenic shock (hypotension without compensatory tachycardia (...) ) Loss of rectal and bladder sphincter tone Urinary and bowel retention leading to abdominal distention, ileus, and delayed gastric emptying This constellation of symptoms is called spinal shock. [ ] (ie, ipsilateral ptosis, miosis, and anhydrosis) is also present with higher lesions because of interruption of the descending sympathetic pathways originating from the hypothalamus. Patients experience problems with temperature regulation because of the sympathetic impairment, which leads to . Lower

2014 eMedicine.com

171. Spinal Orthotics (Overview)

(ABG) measurements - May be useful to evaluate adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation Lactate levels - To monitor perfusion status; can be helpful in the presence of shock Hemoglobin and/or hematocrit levels - May be measured initially and monitored serially to detect or monitor sources of blood loss Urinalysis - Can be performed to detect any associated genitourinary injury Imaging studies Imaging techniques in spinal cord injury include the following: Plain radiography - Radiographs are only (...) management - The cervical spine must be maintained in neutral alignment at all times; clearing of oral secretions and/or debris is essential to maintaining airway patency and preventing aspiration Hypotension - Hypotension may be hemorrhagic and/or neurogenic in acute spinal cord injury; a diligent search for occult sources of hemorrhage must be made Neurogenic shock - Judicious fluid replacement with isotonic crystalloid solution to a maximum of 2 L is the initial treatment of choice; maintain adequate

2014 eMedicine.com

172. Spinal Cord Injury: Definition, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology (Overview)

of spinal cord injury: Arterial blood gas (ABG) measurements - May be useful to evaluate adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation Lactate levels - To monitor perfusion status; can be helpful in the presence of shock Hemoglobin and/or hematocrit levels - May be measured initially and monitored serially to detect or monitor sources of blood loss Urinalysis - Can be performed to detect any associated genitourinary injury Imaging studies Imaging techniques in spinal cord injury include the following: Plain (...) Emergency department care Airway management - The cervical spine must be maintained in neutral alignment at all times; clearing of oral secretions and/or debris is essential to maintaining airway patency and preventing aspiration Hypotension - Hypotension may be hemorrhagic and/or neurogenic in acute spinal cord injury; a diligent search for occult sources of hemorrhage must be made Neurogenic shock - Judicious fluid replacement with isotonic crystalloid solution to a maximum of 2 L is the initial

2014 eMedicine.com

173. Spinal Cord Trauma and Related Diseases (Follow-up)

of SCI after injury. In addition, educational programs for adolescents and families demonstrating common causes of SCI and the severity of SCI may help decrease its incidence. Previous Next: Complications See the list below: In the acute phase, the classic syndrome of complete spinal cord transection at the high cervical level includes a constellation of symptoms called spinal shock. This syndrome consists of the following symptoms: Respiratory insufficiency Quadriplegia with upper and lower (...) the respiratory muscles. High thoracic lesions lead to paraparesis instead of quadriparesis but autonomic symptoms are still marked. In lower thoracic and lower lesions, hypotension is not present but urinary and bowel retention are. In the subacute phase, spinal shock is replaced by the return of intrinsic activity of spinal neurons. This usually happens in humans within 3 weeks. However, the spinal shock phase may be prolonged by other medical complications, such as infections. Patients have persistent

2014 eMedicine.com

174. Cardiovascular Concerns in Spinal Cord Injury (Follow-up)

. Observe the patient for pallor, flushing, sweating, skin temperature, or piloerection (signs of SNS dysfunction). Comprehensive motor and sensory examination can determine the neurologic level and completeness of the injury and may assist with assessing the risk for SNS dysfunction. Reflex testing, especially below the level of injury, can be done to determine whether spinal shock is still present. Examine for peripheral edema and warmth or tenderness of the extremities. Unilateral extremity swelling (...) discharge. Neurorehabil Neural Repair . 2014 Mar-Apr. 28 (3):219-29. . Frisbie JH. Microvascular instability in tetraplegic patients: preliminary observations. Spinal Cord . 2004 May. 42(5):290-3. . Mathias CJ, Christensen NJ, Frankel HL, et al. Cardiovascular control in recently injured tetraplegics in spinal shock. Q J Med . 1979 Apr. 48(190):273-87. . Mathias CJ, Frankel HL. Clinical manifestations of malfunctioning sympathetic mechanisms in tetraplegia. J Auton Nerv Syst . 1983 Mar-Apr. 7(3-4):303

2014 eMedicine.com

175. Spinal Cord Injury: Definition, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology (Diagnosis)

of spinal cord injury: Arterial blood gas (ABG) measurements - May be useful to evaluate adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation Lactate levels - To monitor perfusion status; can be helpful in the presence of shock Hemoglobin and/or hematocrit levels - May be measured initially and monitored serially to detect or monitor sources of blood loss Urinalysis - Can be performed to detect any associated genitourinary injury Imaging studies Imaging techniques in spinal cord injury include the following: Plain (...) Emergency department care Airway management - The cervical spine must be maintained in neutral alignment at all times; clearing of oral secretions and/or debris is essential to maintaining airway patency and preventing aspiration Hypotension - Hypotension may be hemorrhagic and/or neurogenic in acute spinal cord injury; a diligent search for occult sources of hemorrhage must be made Neurogenic shock - Judicious fluid replacement with isotonic crystalloid solution to a maximum of 2 L is the initial

2014 eMedicine.com

176. Spinal Cord Trauma and Related Diseases (Diagnosis)

happens within minutes. The cord fills the whole spinal canal at the injury level and leads to further secondary ischemia. Loss of autoregulation and spinal shock cause systemic hypotension and exacerbate ischemia. Ischemia, toxic metabolic compounds, and electrolyte changes cause a secondary injury cascade. Hypoperfusion of gray matter extends to the surrounding white matter and alters the propagation of action potentials along the axons, contributing to spinal shock. Glutamate is a key element (...) . 40(4):499-519. . Petropoulou KB, Panourias IG, Rapidi CA, Sakas DE. The phenomenon of spasticity: a pathophysiological and clinical introduction to neuromodulation therapies. Acta Neurochir Suppl . 2007. 97:137-44. . Giuliano F, Rubio-Aurioles E, Kennelly M, et al. Efficacy and safety of vardenafil in men with erectile dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury. Neurology . 2006 Jan 24. 66(2):210-6. . Atkinson PP, Atkinson JL. Spinal shock. Mayo Clin Proc . 1996 Apr. 71(4):384-9. . Ditunno JF Jr

2014 eMedicine.com

177. Spinal Cord, Topographical and Functional Anatomy (Diagnosis)

: Classic Spinal Cord Syndromes The classic syndromes of spinal cord injury are described here. In most instances, however, incomplete forms are far more common. Complete spinal cord transection syndrome In the acute phase, the classic syndrome of complete spinal cord transection at the high cervical level consists of the following: Respiratory insufficiency Quadriplegia Upper and lower extremity areflexia Anesthesia below the affected level Neurogenic shock (hypotension without compensatory tachycardia (...) ) Loss of rectal and bladder sphincter tone Urinary and bowel retention leading to abdominal distention, ileus, and delayed gastric emptying This constellation of symptoms is called spinal shock. [ ] (ie, ipsilateral ptosis, miosis, and anhydrosis) is also present with higher lesions because of interruption of the descending sympathetic pathways originating from the hypothalamus. Patients experience problems with temperature regulation because of the sympathetic impairment, which leads to . Lower

2014 eMedicine.com

178. Spinal Orthotics (Diagnosis)

(ABG) measurements - May be useful to evaluate adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation Lactate levels - To monitor perfusion status; can be helpful in the presence of shock Hemoglobin and/or hematocrit levels - May be measured initially and monitored serially to detect or monitor sources of blood loss Urinalysis - Can be performed to detect any associated genitourinary injury Imaging studies Imaging techniques in spinal cord injury include the following: Plain radiography - Radiographs are only (...) management - The cervical spine must be maintained in neutral alignment at all times; clearing of oral secretions and/or debris is essential to maintaining airway patency and preventing aspiration Hypotension - Hypotension may be hemorrhagic and/or neurogenic in acute spinal cord injury; a diligent search for occult sources of hemorrhage must be made Neurogenic shock - Judicious fluid replacement with isotonic crystalloid solution to a maximum of 2 L is the initial treatment of choice; maintain adequate

2014 eMedicine.com

179. Spinal Cord Injuries (Treatment)

of the patient's cervical spine is a potential pitfall. Hypotension, hemorrhage, and shock Hypotension may be hemorrhagic and/or neurogenic in acute spinal cord injury. Because of the vital sign confusion in acute spinal cord injury and the high incidence of associated injuries, a diligent search for occult sources of hemorrhage must be made. The most common sources of occult hemorrhage are injuries to the chest, abdomen, and retroperitoneum and fractures of the pelvis or long-bones. Appropriate investigations (...) Spinal Cord Injuries (Treatment) Spinal Cord Injuries Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Prehospital Management, Emergency Department Management Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

180. Rehabilitation of Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries (Treatment)

Rehabilitation of Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries (Treatment) Rehabilitation of Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries: Background, Common Medical Problems, Thromboembolic Disease Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) =aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTI2NTIwOS1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Rehabilitation of Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Updated: Mar 07, 2019 Author: Michael F Saulino, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Jeffrey A Goldstein, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Rehabilitation of Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is perhaps the most devastating orthopedic injury, and with prolonged survival being the rule, rehabilitation of these injuries has an increasingly important role. The primary goals

2014 eMedicine Surgery

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>