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Spinal Shock

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41. Effect of Repeating Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

Effect of Repeating Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Effect of Repeating Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effect of Repeating Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03089372 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : March 24, 2017 Last Update

2017 Clinical Trials

42. 6 vs 12 Sessions in Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

6 vs 12 Sessions in Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED) 6 vs 12 Sessions in Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. 6 vs 12 Sessions in Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (LI-ESWT) for Erectile Dysfunction (ED) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03089307 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : March 24, 2017 Last Update

2017 Clinical Trials

43. Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction: Standardisation of Treatment Protocol

Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction: Standardisation of Treatment Protocol Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction: Standardisation of Treatment Protocol - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction: Standardisation of Treatment Protocol The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03089294 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : March 24, 2017

2017 Clinical Trials

44. The heat shock response in neurons and astroglia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases (PubMed)

The heat shock response in neurons and astroglia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases Protein inclusions are a predominant molecular pathology found in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Protein inclusions form in discrete areas of the brain characteristic to the type of neurodegenerative disease, and coincide with the death of neurons in that region (e.g. spinal cord motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (...) ). This suggests that the process of protein misfolding leading to inclusion formation is neurotoxic, and that cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms that maintain protein homeostasis (proteostasis) can, at times, be insufficient to prevent protein inclusion formation in the central nervous system. The heat shock response is a pro-survival pathway induced under conditions of cellular stress that acts to maintain proteostasis through the up-regulation of heat shock proteins, a superfamily

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2017 Molecular neurodegeneration

45. Combination therapy with extracorporeal shock wave and melatonin markedly attenuated neuropathic pain in rat (PubMed)

Combination therapy with extracorporeal shock wave and melatonin markedly attenuated neuropathic pain in rat This study tested the hypothesis that combination therapy using extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW)-melatonin (Mel) was superior to either alone at ameliorating neuropathic pain (NP). NP was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the left sciatic nerve in rats. Animals were categorized into sham control (group 1), CCI only (group 2), CCI-ECSW (group 3), CCI-Mel (group 4) and CCI (...) (cleaved capase-3/PARP), and MAPK family biomarkers (p-P38/p-JNK/p-ERK1/2) in dorsal root ganglia and spinal dorsal horn expressed a similar pattern of MPWT/TPWL among the five groups, except for significantly higher in group 4 than in group 3 (all p<0.0001). The protein expressions of Nav.1.3, Nav.1.8 and Nav.1.9 in sciatic nerve displayed an identical pattern to inflammation among the five groups (all p<0.001). Pain facilitated cellular expressions (p-P38+/peripherin+ cells, P38+/NF200+ cells

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2017 American journal of translational research

46. The Role of the Heat Shock Protein B8 (HSPB8) in Motoneuron Diseases (PubMed)

The Role of the Heat Shock Protein B8 (HSPB8) in Motoneuron Diseases Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) are two motoneuron diseases (MNDs) characterized by aberrant protein behavior in affected cells. In familial ALS (fALS) and in SBMA specific gene mutations lead to the production of neurotoxic proteins or peptides prone to misfold, which then accumulate in form of aggregates. Notably, some of these proteins accumulate into aggregates also (...) in sporadic ALS (sALS) even if not mutated. To prevent proteotoxic stresses detrimental to cells, misfolded and/or aggregated proteins must be rapidly removed by the protein quality control (PQC) system. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) is a chaperone induced by harmful events, like proteasome inhibition. HSPB8 is expressed both in motoneuron and muscle cells, which are both targets of misfolded protein toxicity in MNDs. In ALS mice models, in presence of the mutant proteins, HSPB8 is upregulated

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2017 Frontiers in molecular neuroscience

47. Early physical therapy/occupational therapy specific interventions for traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI)

of spinal cord injury is the difficulty distinguishing the extent of spinal cord injury in pediatric patients (Hayes 2005 [5b]). Neurogenic shock complications experienced following traumatic spinal cord (including hypotension, bradycardia, and peripheral vasodilatation) can also interfere with early mobilization and rehabilitation (Hayes 2005 [5b]). Additionally, in the early course of management it may be difficult to discern if the spinal cord injury is complete or incomplete, thus impacting (...) Early physical therapy/occupational therapy specific interventions for traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy / Spinal Cord Injury / Early Physical Therapy / BESt ### Copyright © 2014 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; all rights reserved. Page 1 of 8 Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy/Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)/ Early Therapy Specific Intervention /BESt 193 Best Evidence Statement Date: September 5, 2014 Title: Early physical therapy

2014 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

48. Early neurological care of patients with spinal cord injury. (PubMed)

of SCI patients. Recommendations were developed by consensus and graded using a modified Oxford system which identifies level of evidence (LOE) and grade of recommendation (GOR).Emergency health care providers must address altered mental status, evidence of intoxication, suspected extremity fracture/distracting injury, focal neurological deficit and spinal pain/tenderness to determine the risk of SCI in a trauma patient [LOE 1, GOR A]. Neurogenic shock must be recognized and treated [LOE 3, GOR (...) Early neurological care of patients with spinal cord injury. Considering the major clinical challenges of managing patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), we summarized the relevant aspects of the early (within 1 year after SCI) neurological care emphasizing common standards.This review was performed according to the methodology recommended by the Joint SIU-ICUD International Consultation. Embase and Medline databases were used to identify literature relevant to the early neurological care

2018 World journal of urology

49. Incidence and risk factors of wound complications in long segment instrumented thoracolumbar spinal fusions: a retrospective study (PubMed)

Incidence and risk factors of wound complications in long segment instrumented thoracolumbar spinal fusions: a retrospective study This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Our objective was to determine the incidence and assess the risk factors associated with surgical site wound complications in long segment (7+ vertebrae) instrumented thoracolumbar fusions. Surgical site complications lead to patient morbidity, increased financial burden, and further medical (...) intervention. Risk factors for wound complications in spinal surgery include patient factors such as obesity and diabetes, and surgical factors such as operative time and procedure type. Fusion with instrumentation is one of the strongest associated risk factors in the literature.A comprehensive search of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) from 2005 to 2014 was performed, selecting cases based on Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. Cases were then stratified based

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2018 Journal of Spine Surgery

50. Effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on oxidative stress injury in rat spinal cords by regulating the eNOS/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway (PubMed)

blot analyses were used to detect eNOS, phosphorylated (p)-eNOS, heat shock protein (HSP)90, Nrf2 and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (Nqo1) at the mRNA and protein level. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Nrf2 and p-eNOS. Compared with the S group, the scores of spinal cord function in the SCI group were significantly lower, and the levels of MDA were significantly increased, while the levels of SOD, CAT and GSH protein in spinal cord were significantly decreased (P<0.05 (...) Effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on oxidative stress injury in rat spinal cords by regulating the eNOS/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway The present study aimed to investigate whether ginsenoside Rb1 (G-Rb1) attenuates spinal cord injury-associated oxidative stress in rats by regulating the endothelial nitric oxide synthase eNOS/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase (HO)-1 signaling pathway. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into the sham operation group (S group

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2018 Experimental and therapeutic medicine

51. Pain Input After Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Undermines Long-Term Recovery and Engages Signal Pathways That Promote Cell Death (PubMed)

Pain Input After Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Undermines Long-Term Recovery and Engages Signal Pathways That Promote Cell Death Pain (nociceptive) input caudal to a spinal contusion injury increases tissue loss and impairs long-term recovery. It was hypothesized that noxious stimulation has this effect because it engages unmyelinated pain (C) fibers that produce a state of over-excitation in central pathways. The present article explored this issue by assessing the effect of capsaicin, which (...) then performed to compare the acute effect of shock and capsaicin treatment. Both forms of noxious stimulation increased expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and caspase-3, which promotes apoptotic cell death. Shock, but not capsaicin, enhanced expression of signals related to pyroptotic cell death [caspase-1, inteleukin-1 beta (IL-1ß)]. Pyroptosis has been linked to the activation of the P2X7 receptor and the outward flow of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through the pannexin-1 channel. Blocking the P2X7

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2018 Frontiers in systems neuroscience

52. Strengthening Health Systems for Persons With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in South Africa and Sweden

Strengthening Health Systems for Persons With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in South Africa and Sweden Strengthening Health Systems for Persons With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in South Africa and Sweden - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please (...) remove one or more studies before adding more. Strengthening Health Systems for Persons With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in South Africa and Sweden The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03437850 Recruitment

2018 Clinical Trials

53. Temporal analysis of cardiovascular control and function following incomplete T3 and T10 spinal cord injury in rodents (PubMed)

Temporal analysis of cardiovascular control and function following incomplete T3 and T10 spinal cord injury in rodents Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that results in whole-body dysfunction, notably cardiovascular (CV) disruption and disease. Injury-induced destruction of autonomic pathways in conjunction with a progressive decline in physical fitness contribute to the poor CV status of SCI individuals. Despite the wide use of exercise training as a therapeutic option (...) animals displayed a drastic decline in heart rate (HR) during the exercise challenge, likely a consequence of neurogenic shock. Furthermore, over time, all groups developed a progressive inability to maintain BP within a narrow range during the exercise challenge despite displaying normal hemodynamic parameters at rest. Echocardiography of T10 animals revealed no persistent signs of cardiac dysfunction; T3 animals exhibited a transient decline in systolic function that returned to preinjury levels

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2018 Physiological reports

54. Predicting critical care unit-level complications after long-segment fusion procedures for adult spinal deformity (PubMed)

Predicting critical care unit-level complications after long-segment fusion procedures for adult spinal deformity To identify predictive factors for critical care unit-level complications (CCU complication) after long-segment fusion procedures for adult spinal deformity (ASD).The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database [2010-2014] was reviewed. Only adult patients who underwent fusion of 7 or more spinal levels for ASD were included. CCU (...) complications included intraoperative arrest/infarction, ventilation >48 hours, pulmonary embolism, renal failure requiring dialysis, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, unplanned intubation, septic shock, stroke, coma, or new neurological deficit. A stepwise multivariate regression was used to identify independent predictors of CCU complications.Among 826 patients, the rate of CCU complications was 6.4%. On multivariate regression analysis, dependent functional status (P=0.004), combined approach (P

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2018 Journal of Spine Surgery

55. Zhenbao Pill reduces Treg cell proportion in acute spinal cord injury rats by regulating TUG1/miR-214/HSP27 axis (PubMed)

Zhenbao Pill reduces Treg cell proportion in acute spinal cord injury rats by regulating TUG1/miR-214/HSP27 axis Background: Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the weakest pathologies that seriously affect the quality of life of patients. Objective: To study the mechanism of how Zhenbao Pill reduces Treg cell proportion and improves acute SCI. Methods: A rat SCI model was established. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the Treg cell proportion. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP (...) ) and RNA pull-down were applied in confirming taurine up-regulated gene 1 (TUG1) and miR-214 binding. Intrathecal injection of TUG1 siRNA was also conducted to determine the effect of TUG1 in vivoResults: Zhenbao Pill promoted the expression of TUG1 and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) protein, and reduced the expression of miR-214 and forkhead box protein p3 (Foxp3) as well as Treg cell proportion in a concentration-dependent manner in SCI rats or in vitro cultured CD4+ T cells. Knockdown of TUG1

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2018 Bioscience reports

56. Virtual Reality Walking for Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

and neurological lesions. It has components of how the pain feels to the patient (e.g. burning, cold, electrical shocks, tingling, hypoaesthesia). Responses to each item is yes or no, with each yes response equaling one point. Range of scores: 0-10. 4/10 and greater indicate neuropathic pain. Pain Interference specific to spinal cord injury as assessed by International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set version 2.0 [ Time Frame: Baseline - Final assessment (average 1 week post treatment) ] Pain (...) Virtual Reality Walking for Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury Virtual Reality Walking for Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Virtual Reality Walking

2018 Clinical Trials

57. 30-Day Mortality Following Surgery for Spinal Epidural Abscess: Incidence, Risk Factors, Predictive Algorithm, and Associated Complications. (PubMed)

30-Day Mortality Following Surgery for Spinal Epidural Abscess: Incidence, Risk Factors, Predictive Algorithm, and Associated Complications. Retrospective case-control study.To determine incidence and timing of mortality following surgery for spinal epidural abscess (SEA), identify risk factors for mortality, and identify complications associated with mortality.SEA is a serious condition with potentially devastating sequelae. There is a paucity of literature characterizing mortality following (...) (95% CI: 0.683-0.839, p < 0.001). Cardiac arrest (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 72.240, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 27.8-187.721, p < 0.001), septic shock (aOR: 15.382, 95% CI: 7.604-31.115, p < 0.001), and pneumonia (aOR: 2.84, 95% CI: 1.109-7.275, p = 0.03) were independently associated with mortality.The 30-day mortality rate following surgery for SEA was 3.7%. Of the mortalities that occurred within 30 days of surgery, the majority occurred within 2 weeks. Independent risk factors for mortality

2018 Spine

58. Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy for Upper Urinary Tract Calculi in Patients with Spinal Deformity:A decade's experience. (PubMed)

embolization or nephrectomy. Stone-free status was achieved in 71 kidneys (89.87%). 8 patients with residual fragments ≥4 mm were either observed without treatment during follow-up or retreated with shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) according to clinical significance.PCNL in patients with spinal deformities is challenging but safe and efficient. Ultrasound guided puncture and access establishment has its unique advantages when such patients were posed in irregular positions. This article is protected (...) Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy for Upper Urinary Tract Calculi in Patients with Spinal Deformity:A decade's experience. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in managing upper urinary tract calculi in patients with spinal deformity based on our experience during the last decade.A retrospective study was conducted on patients with spinal deformity who were admitted to Beijing Tsinghua Changgung Hospital and the collaborative

2018 BJU international

59. Unintended Consequences for Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Unintended Consequences for Patients with Spinal Cord Injury Posted on December 11, 2018 by CDC's Safe Healthcare Blog Matt Davis, MD Matt Davis, MD, Clinical Medical Director SCI Service Line, TIRR Memorial Hermann The story would have been shocking, if I had not seen the precursors many times before. My patient was paralyzed by a bulging disc in her spine. In an effort to achieve “High Reliability” and reach the goal (...) Unintended Consequences for Patients with Spinal Cord Injury Unintended Consequences for Patients with Spinal Cord Injury | | Blogs | CDC Search Form Controls TOPIC ONLY Search The CDC cancel submit Search Form Controls TOPIC ONLY Search The CDC cancel submit Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: . Get Email Updates To receive email updates

2018 CDC Safe Healthcare blog

60. Spinal shock

Spinal shock Emergency Medicine Blog: Spinal shock Sunday, June 16, 2013 Spinal shock Spinal shock is not really "shock" in the sense of circulatory collapse but rather a transient or temporary (physiologic rather than anatomical) complete loss of all neurologic function, including reflexes and rectal tone, below a specific level that is associated with autonomic dysfunction. This phenomenon was first described in 1750 by Whytt. Spinal shock begins within a few minutes following an acute spinal (...) cord injury (but not chronic spinal cord injury), it make take several hours before the full effects occur It usually recovers within 24 hours but may last over few days to weeks in less common cases. In some rare cases spinal cord shock can last for several more months. The first reflexes to reappear are polysynaptic in nature, such as the bulbocavernosus reflex. Bulbocavernosus reflex can be checked by noting anal sphincter contraction in response to squeezing the glans penis or tugging

2013 Emergency Medicine Blog

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