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Speech Delay

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21. Kinematic Analysis of Speech Sound Sequencing Errors Induced by Delayed Auditory Feedback (PubMed)

Kinematic Analysis of Speech Sound Sequencing Errors Induced by Delayed Auditory Feedback Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) causes speakers to become disfluent and make phonological errors. Methods for assessing the kinematics of speech errors are lacking, with most DAF studies relying on auditory perceptual analyses, which may be problematic, as errors judged to be categorical may actually represent blends of sounds or articulatory errors.Eight typical speakers produced nonsense syllable (...) sequences under normal and DAF (200 ms). Lip and tongue kinematics were captured with electromagnetic articulography. Time-locked acoustic recordings were transcribed, and the kinematics of utterances with and without perceived errors were analyzed with existing and novel quantitative methods.New multivariate measures showed that for 5 participants, kinematic variability for productions perceived to be error free was significantly increased under delay; these results were validated by using

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2017 Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR

22. Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes (PubMed)

Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes Speech delay with an unknown cause is a problem among children. This diagnosis is the last differential diagnosis after observing normal findings in routine hearing tests. The present study was undertaken to determine whether auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli are different between normally developing children and children suffering from delayed speech (...) with unknown causes. In this cross-sectional study, we compared click auditory brainstem responses between 261 children who were clinically diagnosed with delayed speech with unknown causes based on normal routine auditory test findings and neurological examinations and had >12 months of speech delay (case group) and 261 age- and sex-matched normally developing children (control group). Our results indicated that the case group exhibited significantly higher wave amplitude responses to click stimuli (waves

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2016 Iranian journal of medical sciences

23. A t(5;16) translocation is the likely driver of a syndrome with ambiguous genitalia, facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and speech delay (PubMed)

A t(5;16) translocation is the likely driver of a syndrome with ambiguous genitalia, facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and speech delay Genetic studies grounded on monogenic paradigms have accelerated both gene discovery and molecular diagnosis. At the same time, complex genomic rearrangements are also appreciated as potent drivers of disease pathology. Here, we report two male siblings with a dysmorphic face, ambiguous genitalia, intellectual disability, and speech delay. Through (...) quad-based whole-exome sequencing and concomitant molecular cytogenetic testing, we identified two copy-number variants (CNVs) in both affected individuals likely arising from a balanced translocation: a 13.5-Mb duplication on Chromosome 16 (16q23.1 → 16qter) and a 7.7-Mb deletion on Chromosome 5 (5p15.31 → 5pter), as well as a hemizygous missense variant in CXorf36 (also known as DIA1R). The 5p terminal deletion has been associated previously with speech delay, whereas craniofacial dysmorphia

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2016 Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies

24. Deleterious mutation in GPR88 is associated with chorea, speech delay, and learning disabilities (PubMed)

Deleterious mutation in GPR88 is associated with chorea, speech delay, and learning disabilities To identify the underlying molecular basis of a familial developmental disorder characterized by chorea, marked speech delay, and learning difficulties in 4 sisters from a consanguineous family.Whole-exome analysis of DNA of the 2 older patients followed by Sanger sequencing of the mutated exon in all family members.A homozygous deleterious mutation, p.C291X, was identified in the GPR88 gene in both (...) exome analyses. The mutation segregated with the disease in the family and was absent from a large cohort of controls.Homozygous deleterious mutation in GPR88 in humans is associated with marked speech delay, learning disabilities, and chorea, which manifest at 8-9 years of age. The finding is consistent with the reported abundant expression of GPR88 in the striatum and the hyperkinetic activity and learning impairment observed in GPR88 knockout mice. Although further functional characterization

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2016 Neurology: Genetics

25. Speech Delay

Speech Delay Speech Delay Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Speech Delay Speech Delay Aka: Speech Delay , Language Delay (...) From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology : 219% of children ages 2-7 years old in the U.S. III. Diagnosis IV. Causes: Primary Language Disorders Developmental Speech and Language Delay Delayed speech despite normal comprehension, intelligence, hearing, socialization, articulation Most common of the primary language disorders Expect normal speech by school age with parent and therapist intervention Expressive Language Disorder Presents in similar fashion to Developmental Speech and Language Delay

2018 FP Notebook

26. Does the degree of linguistic experience (native versus nonnative) modulate the degree to which listeners can benefit from a delay between the onset of the maskers and the onset of the target speech? (PubMed)

Does the degree of linguistic experience (native versus nonnative) modulate the degree to which listeners can benefit from a delay between the onset of the maskers and the onset of the target speech? Background noise has a greater adverse effect on word recognition when people are listening in their second language (L2) as opposed to their first language (L1). The present study investigates the extent to which linguistic experience affects the ability of L2 listeners to benefit from a delay (...) between the onset of a masker and the onset of a word. In a previous study (Ben-David, Tse & Schneider, 2012), word recognition thresholds for young L1s were found to improve with the increase in the delay between the onset of a masker (either a stationary noise or a babble of voices) and the onset of a word. The investigators interpreted this result as reflecting the ability of L1 listeners to rapidly segregate the target words from a masker. Given stream segregation depends, in part, on top-down

2016 Hearing Research

27. A Speech Recognition-based Solution for the Automatic Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment from Spontaneous Speech (PubMed)

neuropsychological screening method which is based on the analysis of spontaneous speech production during performing a memory task. In the future, this can form the basis of an Internet-based interactive screening software for the recognition of MCI.Participants were 38 healthy controls and 48 clinically diagnosed MCI patients. The provoked spontaneous speech by asking the patients to recall the content of 2 short black and white films (one direct, one delayed), and by answering one question. Acoustic (...) statistical analysis showed significant differences for most of the acoustic parameters (speech tempo, articulation rate, silent pause, hesitation ratio, length of utterance, pause-per-utterance ratio). The most significant differences between the two groups were found in the speech tempo in the delayed recall task, and in the number of pauses for the question-answering task. The fully automated version of the analysis process - that is, using the ASR-based features in combination with machine learning

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2018 Current Alzheimer research

28. Poor Speech Perception Is Not a Core Deficit of Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Preliminary Findings (PubMed)

Poor Speech Perception Is Not a Core Deficit of Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Preliminary Findings Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is hypothesized to arise from deficits in speech motor planning and programming, but the influence of abnormal speech perception in CAS on these processes is debated. This study examined speech perception abilities among children with CAS with and without language impairment compared to those with language impairment, speech delay, and typically developing (...) significantly poorer syllable discrimination abilities compared to children with CAS only and typically developing peers. Children with speech delay and language impairment also showed significantly poorer discrimination abilities, with appreciable within-group variability.These findings suggest that speech perception deficits are not a core feature of CAS but rather occur with co-occurring language impairment in a subset of children with CAS. This study establishes the significance of accounting

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2018 Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR

29. Assessment of learning difficulty and cognitive delay

Assessment of learning difficulty and cognitive delay Assessment of learning difficulty and cognitive delay - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of learning difficulty and cognitive delay Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Intellectual impairment may be either generalised (cognitive impairment) or specific to one area (learning difficulty). Children with cognitive (...) impairment have below-average IQ, at <70. Harris JC. Developmental neuropsychiatry, Volumes 1 and 2. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press; 1998. The degree of cognitive impairment depends on the underlying disorder and its severity. An IQ of 50 to 70 is classed as mild cognitive impairment. Children with a specific learning difficulty, on the other hand, have difficulties with particular mental tasks but a normal IQ. Examples include difficulties with speech (specific language impairment), reading

2018 BMJ Best Practice

30. When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment and family risk of dyslexia. (PubMed)

emergent literacy skills, and children with 'disordered' speech errors had poorer word reading skills than children whose speech errors indicated 'delay'. In contrast, the initial severity of SSD was not a significant predictor of reading development. Beyond the domain of speech, the presence of a co-occurring language impairment was strongly predictive of literacy skills and having a family risk of dyslexia predicted additional variance in literacy at both time-points.Early SSD alone has only modest (...) When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment and family risk of dyslexia. This study considers the role of early speech difficulties in literacy development, in the context of additional risk factors.Children were identified with speech sound disorder (SSD) at the age of 3½ years, on the basis of performance on the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology. Their literacy skills were assessed at the start

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2017 Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

31. Treatment for speech disorder in Friedreich ataxia and other hereditary ataxia syndromes. (PubMed)

on speech in a group of participants with mixed hereditary, sporadic and unknown origin ataxias. No significant differences were observed between treatment and placebo in any other pharmaceutical study. A statistically significant improvement in functional independence occurred at the end of the treatment period in the rehabilitation study compared to the delayed treatment group but these effects were not present 12 to 24 weeks after treatment. Of the four studies that assessed quality of life, none (...) Treatment for speech disorder in Friedreich ataxia and other hereditary ataxia syndromes. Hereditary ataxia syndromes can result in significant speech impairment, a symptom thought to be responsive to treatment. The type of speech impairment most commonly reported in hereditary ataxias is dysarthria. Dysarthria is a collective term referring to a group of movement disorders affecting the muscular control of speech. Dysarthria affects the ability of individuals to communicate and to participate

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2014 Cochrane

32. Recommendations on screening for developmental delay

@canadiantaskforce.ca CMAJ 2016. DOI:10.1503 /cmaj.151437 D evelopmental delay in children may be transitory or sustained and is character- ized by a significant delay (i.e., perfor- mance 1.5 standard deviations or more below age-expected norms) in one or more of the fol- lowing domains: gross and fine motor skills, speech and language, social and personal skills, activities of daily living and cognition. 1,2 Chil- dren with sustained developmental delay are at higher risk of learning difficulties, behavioural (...) cases, but there is evidence that the low specificity of these tools would lead to a high proportion of false positives. • High-quality evidence from RCTs on the effectiveness of treatment for known developmental delay is lacking; a few small trials have suggested that speech and language therapy may improve language impairment and that treatment of autism may improve cognitive function. • Clinicians should remain vigilant to deficits in children’s performance in terms of gross and fine motor skills

2016 CPG Infobase

33. Speech-language disorders ? role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Early Intervention for children ages 0- 3 yrs.

Question P: In children birth-to-three years with primary speech-language disorders I: does receiving early intervention (EI) services facilitated by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) C: compared to a wait and see approach (not receiving services) O: result in improved communication skills as shown through formal speech and language test results? Target Population Inclusion criteria: Children, ages birth-to-three years, with a diagnosed primary speech and language delay/disorder/impairment. Exclusion (...) Criteria: Children older than 36 months, children in specialty populations such as (but not limited to) autism, developmental delay, Down syndrome, English as second language, hearing impairment. Definitions Primary speech and language delay/disorder/impairments: diagnosed when a child's speech and/or language does not develop normally and the difficulties cannot be accounted for by disorders such as physical abnormality of the speech structures, autistic disorder, acquired brain damage or hearing loss

2012 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

34. Dementia, disability and frailty in later life - mid-life approaches to delay or prevent onset

Dementia, disability and frailty in later life - mid-life approaches to delay or prevent onset Dementia, disability and fr Dementia, disability and frailty in later ailty in later life – mid-life approaches to dela life – mid-life approaches to delay or y or pre prev vent onset ent onset NICE guideline Published: 20 October 2015 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng16 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our (...) discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Dementia, disability and frailty in later life – mid-life approaches to delay

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

35. Modulation of Auditory Responses to Speech vs. Nonspeech Stimuli during Speech Movement Planning (PubMed)

modulation depends on the type of auditory stimulus. Thus, here, we asked whether the effect of speech movement planning on auditory processing varies depending on the type of auditory stimulus. In an experiment with nine adult subjects, we recorded LLAEPs that were elicited by either pure tones or speech syllables when these stimuli were presented prior to speech onset in a delayed-response speaking condition vs. a silent reading control condition. Results showed no statistically significant difference (...) Modulation of Auditory Responses to Speech vs. Nonspeech Stimuli during Speech Movement Planning Previously, we showed that the N100 amplitude in long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) elicited by pure tone probe stimuli is modulated when the stimuli are delivered during speech movement planning as compared with no-speaking control conditions. Given that we probed the auditory system only with pure tones, it remained unknown whether the nature and magnitude of this pre-speech auditory

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2016 Frontiers in human neuroscience

36. Speech enhancement based on neural networks improves speech intelligibility in noise for cochlear implant users. (PubMed)

that generalized to novel segments of the same noise type and worked over a range of SNRs. The proposed algorithm has the potential to improve the intelligibility of speech in noise for CI users while meeting the requirements of low computational complexity and processing delay for application in CI devices.Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (...) Speech enhancement based on neural networks improves speech intelligibility in noise for cochlear implant users. Speech understanding in noisy environments is still one of the major challenges for cochlear implant (CI) users in everyday life. We evaluated a speech enhancement algorithm based on neural networks (NNSE) for improving speech intelligibility in noise for CI users. The algorithm decomposes the noisy speech signal into time-frequency units, extracts a set of auditory-inspired features

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2016 Hearing Research

37. Assessment of Neurocognitive Impairment and Speech Functioning Before Head and Neck Cancer Treatment. (PubMed)

function.To document neurocognitive functioning in patients with HNC before treatment and to investigate the association between neurocognitive and speech functioning.Prospective cohort study of newly diagnosed patients with HNC before treatment using a large sample obtained in a nationwide, multicenter setting (Netherlands Quality of Life and Biomedical Cohort Study in Head and Neck Cancer [NET-QUBIC] project).Objective neuropsychological measures of delayed recall, letter fluency, and executive (...) in 12.3% (26 of 212) to 26.2% (56 of 214) of patients. The most altered domains were delayed recall and letter fluency. Seven percent (15 of 208) of the patients reported high levels of everyday neurocognitive failure, and 42.6% (89 of 209) reported speech problems. Objective neurocognitive function was not significantly associated with patient-reported neurocognitive or speech functioning, but the results from patient-reported outcome measures were significantly correlated.Results of this study

2019 JAMA otolaryngology-- head & neck surgery

38. Confidence in uncertainty: Error cost and commitment in early speech hypotheses. (PubMed)

Confidence in uncertainty: Error cost and commitment in early speech hypotheses. Interactions with artificial agents often lack immediacy because agents respond slower than their users expect. Automatic speech recognisers introduce this delay by analysing a user's utterance only after it has been completed. Early, uncertain hypotheses of incremental speech recognisers can enable artificial agents to respond more timely. However, these hypotheses may change significantly with each update

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2018 PLoS ONE

39. Adults who stutter lack the specialised pre-speech facilitation found in non-stutterers. (PubMed)

(MEPs), which were recorded from the tongue. Eighteen adults who stutter (AWS) and 17 adults who do not stutter (ANS) completed three experiments, which involved reading a German prefix+verb utterance from a screen. Each experiment involved 120 trials with three distinct levels of speech production: immediate speech, delayed speech without pacing and delayed speech with predefined pacing. TMS was applied shortly before speech onset. Trial MEPs were normalised to average non-speech MEPs. MEP (...) Adults who stutter lack the specialised pre-speech facilitation found in non-stutterers. Persistent developmental stuttering is a speech fluency disorder defined by its symptoms, where the underlying neurophysiological causes remain uncertain. This study examined the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the speech planning process, using facilitation in the motor cortex during speech preparation as an analogue.transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses induced motor evoked potentials

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2018 PLoS ONE

40. Effect of competing noise on cortical auditory evoked potentials elicited by speech sounds in 7- to 25-year-old listeners. (PubMed)

during an active speech-syllable discrimination task in 58 normal-hearing participants (age 7-25 years). Speech syllables were presented in quiet and embedded in competing speech noise (4-talker babble, +15 dB signal-to-noise ratio; SNR). While noise was expected to similarly reduce amplitude and delay latencies of N1 and P2 peaks in all listeners, it was hypothesized that effects of noise on the P3b peak would be inversely related to age due to the maturation of top-down processing abilities (...) throughout childhood. Consistent with previous work, results showed that a +15 dB SNR reduces amplitudes and delays latencies of CAEPs for listeners of all ages, affecting speech-sound processing, delaying stimulus evaluation, and causing a reduction in behavioral speech-sound discrimination. Contrary to expectations, findings suggest that competing speech noise at a +15 dB SNR may have similar effects on various stages of speech-sound processing for listeners of all ages. Future research directions

2019 Hearing Research

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