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Speech Delay

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3141. Investigation of developmental delay. (PubMed)

Investigation of developmental delay. 7542440 1995 08 22 2018 11 13 1468-2044 72 5 1995 May Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. Investigation of developmental delay. 460-5 Newton R W RW Department of Paediatric Neurology, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Pendlebury. Wraith J E JE eng Journal Article Review England Arch Dis Child 0372434 0003-9888 AIM IM Child Child, Preschool Developmental Disabilities etiology Female Gait Humans Infant Infant Behavior Infant, Newborn (...) Language Disorders etiology Male Physical Examination Speech Disorders etiology Syndrome Truth Disclosure 12 1995 5 1 1995 5 1 0 1 1995 5 1 0 0 ppublish 7542440 PMC1511114 Pediatrics. 1986 Jun;77(6):901-7 3714384 Pediatrics. 1988 Aug;82(2):240-9 3041363 Pediatr Neurol. 1993 Jul-Aug;9(4):255-62 8216537 Arch Dis Child. 1989 Sep;64(9):1317-9 2817955 Arch Dis Child. 1993 Sep;69(3):403-6 8215557 J Med Genet. 1988 Jul;25(7):445-53 3050092

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1995 Archives of Disease in Childhood

3142. The Child with Delayed Language: Assessment and Management (PubMed)

The Child with Delayed Language: Assessment and Management Speech and language disorders are the most common developmental problems among preschool children. Early detection and remediation of delayed language development are important in helping the child establish appropriate social behavior and acquire additional information about the world through the use of language.The major reasons for delayed language acquisition are mixed developmental delay, hearing loss, psychosocial factors (...) , behavioral disturbance, specific language disorder, and major physical handicap. Assessment and management are outlined here by case presentations and discussions. The family physician can play a key role as part of a team of professionals concerned with language delay. (Can Fam Physician 1981; 27:1405-1412).

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1981 Canadian Family Physician

3143. Duplication of chromosome 15 in the region 15q11-13 in a patient with developmental delay and ataxia with similarities to Angelman syndrome. (PubMed)

on cytogenetic analysis. A normal phenotype has also been observed in patients with similar duplications. We report a further patient with a duplication of 15q11-13 which was detected cytogenetically and confirmed on molecular genetic analysis. She has developmental delay, particularly concerning the acquisition of speech, and an ataxic gait. These are interesting clinical features in view of the association of Angelman syndrome with abnormalities of 15q11-13. (...) Duplication of chromosome 15 in the region 15q11-13 in a patient with developmental delay and ataxia with similarities to Angelman syndrome. Duplications of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 have been seen in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and in subjects without the Prader-Willi phenotype but with other clinical features including short stature, diabetes, anal and jejunal atresia, and acanthosis nigricans. The non-PWS subjects all had different phenotypes despite the identical findings

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1993 Journal of Medical Genetics

3144. Parental-based intervention with pre-school language-delayed children. (PubMed)

Parental-based intervention with pre-school language-delayed children. Mothers of children randomly allocated to an experimental group attended fortnightly group parental language training sessions, over a 6-month period. Mothers of children allocated to a matched no intervention control group received no special attention. The results showed significantly greater gains in the expressive language skills of the experimental group compared to the control group. A second experiment was designed (...) to compare the parental involvement approach with direct, individual treatment and to clarify the role of non-specific 'Hawthorne-type' effects. The experimental group mothers attended parental language training sessions, as above. The parental control group mothers also attended training sessions, with the emphasis on general learning skills rather than language. A third group of children received individual, direct speech and language therapy. Results showed significantly greater language gains

1994 European journal of disorders of communication : the journal of the College of Speech and Language Therapists, London Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3145. Randomised controlled trial of community based speech and language therapy in preschool children. (PubMed)

Randomised controlled trial of community based speech and language therapy in preschool children. To compare routine speech and language therapy in preschool children with delayed speech and language against 12 months of "watchful waiting."Pragmatic randomised controlled trial.16 community clinics in Bristol.159 preschool children with appreciable speech or language difficulties who fulfilled criteria for admission to speech and language therapy.Four quantitative measures of speech and language (...) ratio 1.3, 0.67 to 2.4; P=0.46). At the end of the trial, 70% of all children still had substantial speech and language deficits.This study provides little evidence for the effectiveness of speech and language therapy compared with watchful waiting over 12 months. Providers of speech and language therapy should reconsider the appropriateness, timing, nature, and intensity of such therapy in preschool children. Continued research into more specific provision to subgroups of children is also needed

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2000 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

3146. Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature

Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Law J, Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C Authors' objectives To assess the value of screening and intervention for speech and language delays in children up to the age of 7 years. Two additional objectives were to identify priority areas for further (...) not include any diagnostic accuracy studies that compared the performance of the index test with a reference standard of diagnosis. Participants included in the review For effectiveness of intervention: children up to 7 years of age. For accuracy of screening: normal and clinical populations within the 0-7 year age range. Studies had to be of primary speech and language delay. Studies focusing on ADD/ADHD; deafness/sensorineural loss; autism; psychiatric or EBD; Down's Syndrome; cerebral palsy; dyslexia

1998 DARE.

3147. The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature

The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature Law J, Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C Authors' objectives To examine the feasibility of universal (...) screening for speech and language delay. Searching EMBASE, MEDLINE, ERIC, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Linguistics Language Behavior Abstracts were searched for literature published between 1967 and May 1997. SIGLE and the British Library's Index of Conference Proceedings were searched for unpublished literature. No search terms were reported. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review No inclusion criteria were specified. The review included diagnostic accuracy studies. Specific

2000 DARE.

3148. Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature

Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Law J, Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Law J (...) , Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C. Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature. Health Technology Assessment 1998; 2(9): 1-184 Authors' objectives Four domains (prevalence, natural history, intervention and screening) were identified as being key to a review of screening issues, with the following objectives being stated: to undertake a systematic review of research into the value of screening and intervention for speech and language delays in children up

1998 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

3149. Increasing autistic children's daily spontaneous speech. (PubMed)

Increasing autistic children's daily spontaneous speech. We investigated the effectiveness of teaching parents of 3 autistic boys to use a time delay procedure to increase their children's appropriate spontaneous speech in several naturally occurring daily settings (e.g., saying "good morning" in the morning). Generalization across settings and within settings across persons and locations was assessed. Variation in the children's spontaneous speech was also assessed. In addition procedural (...) errors in the parents' use of time delay were calculated. Results indicated that all children increased their daily spontaneous speech and generalized their speech to other locations and persons.

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1991 Journal of applied behavior analysis

3150. Some consequences of stimulus variability on speech processing by 2-month-old infants (PubMed)

explored the consequences of talker variability on infants' memory for speech sounds. The HAS procedure was modified by introducing a 2-min delay period between the familiarization and test phases of the experiment. Talker variability impeded infants' encoding of speech sounds. Infants who heard versions of the same syllable produced by 12 different talkers did not detect a change to a new syllable produced by the same talkers after the delay period. However, infants who heard the same syllable (...) produced by a single talker were able to detect the phonetic change after the delay. Finally, although infants who heard productions from a single talker retained information about the phonetic structure of the syllable during the delay, they apparently did not retain information about the identity of the talker. Experiment 3 reduced the range of variability across talkers and investigated whether variability interferes with retention of all speech information. Although reducing the range

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1992 Cognition

3151. COMPREHENSION OF SYNTHETIC SPEECH PRODUCED BY RULE: A REVIEW AND THEORETICAL INTERPRETATION (PubMed)

COMPREHENSION OF SYNTHETIC SPEECH PRODUCED BY RULE: A REVIEW AND THEORETICAL INTERPRETATION In this paper, we review research on the perception and comprehension of synthetic speech produced by rule. We discuss the difficulties that synthetic speech causes for the listener and the evidence that the immediate result of those difficulties is a delay in the point at which words are recognized. We then argue that this delay in processing affects not only lexical access but also comprehension (...) processes. We consider the mechanisms by which the comprehension system adjusts to this delay, the resulting costs to higher level comprehension processes, and the changes that occur in the language processing system as its familiarity with synthetic speech increases. Based on the framework we have developed, we suggest several directions for future research on the comprehension of synthetic speech.

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1992 Language and speech

3152. Speech Rate Modification and Its Effects on Fluency Reversal in Fluent Speakers and People Who Stutter (PubMed)

. There are two ways of dealing with this situation when it arises. Speakers can (1) delay production of a content word by repeating prior function words or (2) carry on and attempt to produce the following content word and gamble that the remainder of the plan arrives while it is being executed. The former strategy does not lead speakers to persist in their dysfluency, while the latter does. It is proposed that the pressure on speech rate that leads speakers to adopt the latter strategy is particularly acute (...) Speech Rate Modification and Its Effects on Fluency Reversal in Fluent Speakers and People Who Stutter A theory has been proposed recently that asserts that the problem that people who stutter have arises when these speakers attempt to execute speech at a faster rate than planning processes allow. This leads speakers to complete words before the following one is ready. Plan unavailability usually happens on the more complex content words rather than the relatively simple function words

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2000 Journal of developmental and physical disabilities

3153. Timing Interference to Speech in Altered Listening Conditions (PubMed)

of synchrony with other speech activity (e.g., delayed auditory feedback, DAF) compared with synchronous forms of altered feedback (e.g., frequency shifted feedback, FSF). Stimulus manipulations that can be made synchronously with speech are predicted to cause equivalent disruption to the synchronous form of altered feedback. Three experiments are reported. In all of them, subjects repeated a syllable at a fixed rate (Wing and Kristofferson, 1973). Overall timing variance was decomposed into the variance (...) Timing Interference to Speech in Altered Listening Conditions A theory is outlined that explains the disruption that occurs when auditory feedback is altered. The key part of the theory is that the number of, and relationship between, inputs to a timekeeper, operative during speech control, affects speech performance. The effects of alteration to auditory feedback depend on the extra input provided to the timekeeper. Different disruption is predicted for auditory feedback that is out

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2002 The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

3154. Speech Characteristics in Coronary Heart Disease

Speech Characteristics in Coronary Heart Disease Speech Characteristics in Coronary Heart Disease - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Speech Characteristics in Coronary Heart Disease The safety (...) related to interviewer stylistics. Condition or disease Cardiovascular Diseases Heart Diseases Coronary Disease Detailed Description: BACKGROUND: Individuals with Type A behavior are characterized as hard driving, competitive, and time urgent; when asked questions they are quick to answer with emphatic speech; they perceive themselves to be striving and competing and are prone to hostility. This core of behaviors is presumed to be on a continuum of intensity with well-developed Type A's at the upper

2000 Clinical Trials

3155. Characteristics of Idiopathic Familial Speech Disorders

disorders such as hearing loss, language delay, or mental retardation. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test III (PPVT-III) Expressive Vocabulary Test (EVT) Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination Revised Token Test; Token test for Children Test of Non verbal intelligence (TONI-2) Digit Span subtest of the WICS-R Audiometric Screening Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation WUG Test of Morphological Encoding Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language (TACL) Khan-Lewis Phonological Analysis INCLUSION CRITERIA (...) Characteristics of Idiopathic Familial Speech Disorders Characteristics of Idiopathic Familial Speech Disorders - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Characteristics of Idiopathic Familial Speech

1999 Clinical Trials

3156. Issues to consider in the evaluation of speech and language therapy for preschool children. (PubMed)

Issues to consider in the evaluation of speech and language therapy for preschool children. This paper reviews some of the methodological issues involved in the design of a randomized controlled trial currently underway in Bristol. The trial compares the progress of preschool children randomly allocated to a 'watching-waiting' control group with the experimental group who have immediate access to therapy. This paper reviews a number of relevant studies, which have either followed up preschool (...) children with early language delays or have investigated the effects of therapy with this age group. The basic design of the trial is outlined along with a discussion of the sample, the measurements used and the therapy given.

1999 Child: care, health and development

3157. The effects of midazolam on pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and audiological reaction times in human volunteers. (PubMed)

with midazolam (0.04 mg/kg) does not alter pure tone or speech audiometric thresholds, but it does significantly delay the reaction time to auditory stimuli. Medical practitioners should advise midazolam-sedated patients of their impaired reaction to auditory warning signals (e.g., traffic and car horns) as part of the day-ward discharge recommendations.In this study, we demonstrate that sedation of healthy volunteers with the benzodiazepine midazolam, in the common clinical dosage, does not affect (...) The effects of midazolam on pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and audiological reaction times in human volunteers. Auditory evoked potentials are effected by benzodiazepines, as is cortical processing of auditory stimuli. The effect of benzodiazepines on auditory sensitivity has not, however, been studied. We designed the present study to investigate the effect of sedative doses of midazolam on pure tone and speech audiometry and on audiological reaction times in healthy volunteers

1999 Anesthesia and analgesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3158. Mothers of children with cleft palate undergoing speech intervention change communicative interaction. (PubMed)

was significantly greater as compared to the number of mothers from the control group that were able to modify their style and mode of interaction.Mothers of children with cleft palate and accompanying language delay modify their communicative style and mode of interaction through active participation in speech therapy. (...) Mothers of children with cleft palate undergoing speech intervention change communicative interaction. Natural learning must include language learning relationships that provide natural support for communication and language learning.To find out if including the mother as an active participant during speech therapy sessions would improve the communicative style and mode of the interaction of the mothers with their cleft palate children.Fifty-nine children with cleft palate and their mothers

2001 International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3159. A multimethod approach to the evaluation of community preschool speech and language therapy provision. (PubMed)

A multimethod approach to the evaluation of community preschool speech and language therapy provision. The paper presents a research study investigating the effectiveness and acceptability of community speech and language therapy provision for preschool children with early speech/language delays. As a 'worked example', it demonstrates the value of a multimethod approach to evaluation.The paper examines how the research findings of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT), a survey (...) questionnaire and qualitative in-depth interviews, which were the methods used in the evaluation, overlap and complement each other.There was little evidence to establish the effectiveness of the speech and language therapy provided in the trial. This lack of difference was reflected in responses of parents to items on the questionnaire. The findings of the RCT, questionnaire and interviews all cast considerable doubt on the prospect of spontaneous resolution of the children's difficulties. Although the RCT

2002 Child: care, health and development Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3160. Speech disruption during delayed auditory feedback with simultaneous visual feedback (PubMed)

Speech disruption during delayed auditory feedback with simultaneous visual feedback Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) regarding speech can cause dysfluency. The purpose of this study was to explore whether providing visual feedback in addition to DAF would ameliorate speech disruption. Speakers repeated sentences and heard their auditory feedback delayed with and without simultaneous visual feedback. DAF led to increased sentence durations and an increased number of speech disruptions. Although (...) visual feedback did not reduce DAF effects on duration, a promising but nonsignificant trend was observed for fewer speech disruptions when visual feedback was provided. This trend was significant in speakers who were overall less affected by DAF. The results suggest the possibility that speakers strategically use alternative sources of feedback.

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2007 The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

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