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Somogyi Phenomena

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1. Somogyi Phenomena

Somogyi Phenomena Somogyi Phenomena Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Somogyi Phenomena Somogyi Phenomena Aka: Somogyi (...) Phenomena , Rebound Hyperglycemia From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Rebound Hyperglycemia in Follows a hypoglycemic reaction during the night III. Diagnosis Check 3 am IV. Management Decrease evening long-acting (NPH) dose Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Somogyi Phenomena." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related

2018 FP Notebook

2. Somogyi Phenomena

Somogyi Phenomena Somogyi Phenomena Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Somogyi Phenomena Somogyi Phenomena Aka: Somogyi (...) Phenomena , Rebound Hyperglycemia From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Rebound Hyperglycemia in Follows a hypoglycemic reaction during the night III. Diagnosis Check 3 am IV. Management Decrease evening long-acting (NPH) dose Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Somogyi Phenomena." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related

2015 FP Notebook

3. Somogyi Phenomenon (Follow-up)

22. 310(12):746-50. . Campbell PJ, Bolli GB, Cryer PE. Pathogenesis of the dawn phenomenon in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Accelerated glucose production and impaired glucose utilization due to nocturnal surges in growth hormone secretion. N Engl J Med . 1985 Jun 6. 312(23):1473-9. . Rybicka M, Krysiak R, Okopie B. The dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect - two phenomena of morning hyperglycaemia. Endokrynol Pol . 2011. 62(3):276-84. Shanik MH, Xu Y, Skrha J, et al (...) Somogyi Phenomenon (Follow-up) Somogyi Phenomenon: Overview, Pathophysiology, Patient History Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTI1NDMyLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Somogyi Phenomenon Updated: Sep 28

2014 eMedicine.com

4. Somogyi Phenomenon (Treatment)

22. 310(12):746-50. . Campbell PJ, Bolli GB, Cryer PE. Pathogenesis of the dawn phenomenon in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Accelerated glucose production and impaired glucose utilization due to nocturnal surges in growth hormone secretion. N Engl J Med . 1985 Jun 6. 312(23):1473-9. . Rybicka M, Krysiak R, Okopie B. The dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect - two phenomena of morning hyperglycaemia. Endokrynol Pol . 2011. 62(3):276-84. Shanik MH, Xu Y, Skrha J, et al (...) Somogyi Phenomenon (Treatment) Somogyi Phenomenon: Overview, Pathophysiology, Patient History Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTI1NDMyLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Somogyi Phenomenon Updated: Sep 28

2014 eMedicine.com

5. Somogyi Phenomenon (Overview)

22. 310(12):746-50. . Campbell PJ, Bolli GB, Cryer PE. Pathogenesis of the dawn phenomenon in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Accelerated glucose production and impaired glucose utilization due to nocturnal surges in growth hormone secretion. N Engl J Med . 1985 Jun 6. 312(23):1473-9. . Rybicka M, Krysiak R, Okopie B. The dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect - two phenomena of morning hyperglycaemia. Endokrynol Pol . 2011. 62(3):276-84. Shanik MH, Xu Y, Skrha J, et al (...) Somogyi Phenomenon (Overview) Somogyi Phenomenon: Overview, Pathophysiology, Patient History Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTI1NDMyLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Somogyi Phenomenon Updated: Sep 28

2014 eMedicine.com

6. Somogyi Phenomenon (Diagnosis)

22. 310(12):746-50. . Campbell PJ, Bolli GB, Cryer PE. Pathogenesis of the dawn phenomenon in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Accelerated glucose production and impaired glucose utilization due to nocturnal surges in growth hormone secretion. N Engl J Med . 1985 Jun 6. 312(23):1473-9. . Rybicka M, Krysiak R, Okopie B. The dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect - two phenomena of morning hyperglycaemia. Endokrynol Pol . 2011. 62(3):276-84. Shanik MH, Xu Y, Skrha J, et al (...) Somogyi Phenomenon (Diagnosis) Somogyi Phenomenon: Overview, Pathophysiology, Patient History Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTI1NDMyLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Somogyi Phenomenon Updated: Sep 28

2014 eMedicine.com

7. Chronic Somogyi rebound

Chronic Somogyi rebound Chronic Somogyi rebound - Wikipedia Chronic Somogyi rebound From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Chronic Somogyi rebound is a contested explanation of phenomena of elevated blood sugars in the morning. Also called the Somogyi effect and posthypoglycemic hyperglycemia , it is a rebounding high blood sugar that is a response to . When managing the blood glucose level with injections, this effect is counter-intuitive to people who experience high blood sugar in the morning (...) as a result of an overabundance of insulin at night. This theoretical phenomenon was named after , a Hungarian-born professor of biochemistry at the Washington University and Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, who prepared the first insulin treatment given to a child with diabetes in the USA in October 1922. Somogyi showed that excessive insulin makes diabetes unstable and first published his findings in 1938. Compare with the , which is a morning rise in blood sugar in response to waning insulin and a surge

2012 Wikipedia

10. Acute Pain Medicine in the United States: A Status Report

degree of injury or inflammation or both, the typical, expected, and physiologic response transforms into pathophysiologic phenomena that can become self-perpetuating to no apparent benefit. Also similar to sepsis, mounting evidence suggests that primary and secondary prevention strategies may disrupt this progression from physiologic response to pathophysiologic disease. In an additional parallel, patients either return to baseline within several days of insult or the acute process transforms

2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine

11. Delirium (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

. [ ] Maddocks I, Somogyi A, Abbott F, et al.: Attenuation of morphine-induced delirium in palliative care by substitution with infusion of oxycodone. J Pain Symptom Manage 12 (3): 182-9, 1996. [ ] Tuma R, DeAngelis LM: Altered mental status in patients with cancer. Arch Neurol 57 (12): 1727-31, 2000. [ ] Breitbart W, Gibson C, Tremblay A: The delirium experience: delirium recall and delirium-related distress in hospitalized patients with cancer, their spouses/caregivers, and their nurses. Psychosomatics 43 (...) analgesics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, antihistamines, and other sedating agents. Withdrawal phenomena associated with substances such as alcohol and benzodiazepines. Despite the very limited systematic study of risk factors for delirium in patients with cancer, risk factors have been identified in hospitalized elderly patients (some of them with cancer) and include the following:[ - ] Severe illness. Level of comorbidity. Advanced age. Prior dementia. Hypoalbuminemia. Infection. Azotemia

2015 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

12. Cognitive Disorders and Delirium

Nurs 22 (6): 308-12, 2001 Nov-Dec. Gagnon P, Allard P, Mâsse B, et al.: Delirium in terminal cancer: a prospective study using daily screening, early diagnosis, and continuous monitoring. J Pain Symptom Manage 19 (6): 412-26, 2000. Maddocks I, Somogyi A, Abbott F, et al.: Attenuation of morphine-induced delirium in palliative care by substitution with infusion of oxycodone. J Pain Symptom Manage 12 (3): 182-9, 1996. Tuma R, DeAngelis LM: Altered mental status in patients with cancer. Arch Neurol 57 (...) of the commonly used chemotherapeutic agents,[ - ] bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, biological response modifiers (e.g., interleukin and interferon), glucocorticoids, and especially psychoactive agents such as opioid analgesics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, antihistamines, and other sedating agents. Withdrawal phenomena associated with substances such as alcohol and benzodiazepines. Despite the very limited systematic study of risk factors for delirium in patients with cancer, risk factors have

2012 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

13. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 (Treatment)

and Somogyi phenomena The dawn phenomenon is the normal tendency of the blood glucose to rise in the early morning before breakfast. This rise, which may result from the nocturnal spikes in growth hormone that cause insulin resistance, is probably enhanced by increased hepatic gluconeogenesis secondary to the diurnal rise in serum cortisol. Augmented hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen cycling are known to occur in patients with type 1 DM. However, both abnormalities, regardless of the duration (...) now believe this phenomenon reflects waning of insulin action with consequent hyperglycemia. In cases of the dawn phenomenon, the patient should check blood glucose levels at 2:00-4:00 AM. The dawn and Somogyi phenomena can be ameliorated by administering intermediate insulin at bedtime. Use of insulin The insulin coverage, with a sliding scale for insulin administration, should not be the only intervention for correcting hyperglycemia, because it is reactive rather than proactive. Also, insulin

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 (Follow-up)

and Somogyi phenomena The dawn phenomenon is the normal tendency of the blood glucose to rise in the early morning before breakfast. This rise, which may result from the nocturnal spikes in growth hormone that cause insulin resistance, is probably enhanced by increased hepatic gluconeogenesis secondary to the diurnal rise in serum cortisol. Augmented hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen cycling are known to occur in patients with type 1 DM. However, both abnormalities, regardless of the duration (...) now believe this phenomenon reflects waning of insulin action with consequent hyperglycemia. In cases of the dawn phenomenon, the patient should check blood glucose levels at 2:00-4:00 AM. The dawn and Somogyi phenomena can be ameliorated by administering intermediate insulin at bedtime. Use of insulin The insulin coverage, with a sliding scale for insulin administration, should not be the only intervention for correcting hyperglycemia, because it is reactive rather than proactive. Also, insulin

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 (Follow-up)

and Somogyi phenomena The dawn phenomenon is the normal tendency of the blood glucose to rise in the early morning before breakfast. This rise, which may result from the nocturnal spikes in growth hormone that cause insulin resistance, is probably enhanced by increased hepatic gluconeogenesis secondary to the diurnal rise in serum cortisol. Augmented hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen cycling are known to occur in patients with type 1 DM. However, both abnormalities, regardless of the duration (...) now believe this phenomenon reflects waning of insulin action with consequent hyperglycemia. In cases of the dawn phenomenon, the patient should check blood glucose levels at 2:00-4:00 AM. The dawn and Somogyi phenomena can be ameliorated by administering intermediate insulin at bedtime. Use of insulin The insulin coverage, with a sliding scale for insulin administration, should not be the only intervention for correcting hyperglycemia, because it is reactive rather than proactive. Also, insulin

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

16. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 (Treatment)

and Somogyi phenomena The dawn phenomenon is the normal tendency of the blood glucose to rise in the early morning before breakfast. This rise, which may result from the nocturnal spikes in growth hormone that cause insulin resistance, is probably enhanced by increased hepatic gluconeogenesis secondary to the diurnal rise in serum cortisol. Augmented hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen cycling are known to occur in patients with type 1 DM. However, both abnormalities, regardless of the duration (...) now believe this phenomenon reflects waning of insulin action with consequent hyperglycemia. In cases of the dawn phenomenon, the patient should check blood glucose levels at 2:00-4:00 AM. The dawn and Somogyi phenomena can be ameliorated by administering intermediate insulin at bedtime. Use of insulin The insulin coverage, with a sliding scale for insulin administration, should not be the only intervention for correcting hyperglycemia, because it is reactive rather than proactive. Also, insulin

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

17. Comorbidity of mental disorders and substance use

and solvents. | ix Introduction Comorbidity or the co-occurrence of mental disorders and substance use disorders is common. The prevalence of comorbidity in the community and the complex interactions that occur between the two sets of disorders should raise doubts about the manner in which we continue to deal with each entity separately. Clinicians need to consider these problems as part of a whole complex of phenomena that are closely linked to one another. There are significant problems

2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

18. Benzodiazepine dependence

withdrawal from benzodiazepines leads to increasingly severe withdrawal symptoms, including an increased risk of seizures; this phenomenon is known as . Kindling phenomena are well established for repeated ethanol (alcohol) withdrawal; alcohol has a very similar mechanism of tolerance and withdrawal to benzodiazepines, involving the GABAa, NMDA, and AMPA receptors. The shift of benzodiazepine receptors to an inverse agonist state after chronic treatment leads the brain to be more sensitive to excitatory (...) , or, if less than a month, that they appeared repeatedly during a 12-month period. Behavioral, cognitive, and physiological phenomena that are associated with the repeated use and that typically include a strong desire to take the drug. Preference given to drug use rather than to other activities and obligations Increased tolerance to effects of the drug and sometimes a . These diagnostic criteria are good for research purposes, but, in everyday clinical practice, they should be interpreted according

2012 Wikipedia

19. Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome

. 209–211. . Onyett, SR (1989). . The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners . 39 (321): 160–3. . . ^ Ashton, Heather (1991). "Protracted withdrawal syndromes from benzodiazepines". Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment . 8 (1–2): 19–28. : . . Lindsay, S.J.E.; Powell, Graham E., eds. (1999). (2nd ed.). Routledge. p. 363. . Authier, N.; Balayssac, D.; Sautereau, M.; Zangarelli, A.; Courty, P.; Somogyi, A.A.; Vennat, B.; Llorca, P.-M.; Eschalier, A. (2009). "Benzodiazepine dependence (...) Of Neuroscience . Retrieved 28 December 2017 . Adam, Kirstine; Oswald, I. (2008). "Can a Rapidly-eliminated Hypnotic Cause Daytime Anxiety?". Pharmacopsychiatry . 22 (3): 115–9. : . . Scharf, Martin B; Kales, Judith A; Bixler, EO; Jacoby, JA; Schweitzer, PK (1982). "Lorazepam—Efficacy, side effects, and rebound phenomena". Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics . 31 (2): 175–9. : . . Walsh, James K; Schweitzer, Paula K; Parwatikar, Sadashiv (1983). "Effects of lorazepam and its withdrawal on sleep, performance

2012 Wikipedia

20. Nursing Care of Dyspnea:The 6th Vital Sign in Individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

, 1996). Although cognizant of its significant contribution to the understanding of the phenomena, investigation of this mechanically inappropriate position is not, however, supported as the complete explanation of reported breathlessness in all clinical situations (Adams, 1996; Adams, Lane, Shea, Cockcroft & Guz, 1985; Demediuk, Manning, Lilly, Fencl, Weinberger, Weiss et al., 1992). Other factors related to biochemical and mechanical stimulation have also been offered as partial explanations (...) of the phenomena. Research into the role of chemoreceptors as co-collaborators in the precipitation of dyspnea has also proven controversial and inconclusive (Burki, 1987; Tobin, 1990). This debate has centred on the independent and combined effect of hypercapnea, hypoxia, and muscle contraction. Earlier work contended that elevations in arterial carbon dioxide did not contribute to sensations of dyspnea (Noble, Eisele, Trenchard & Guz, 1970). Current research asserts, however, that hypercapnea does contribute

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

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