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Skin Discoloration

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61. Bilateral Orange Discoloration of the Upper Eyelids: A Quiz. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bilateral Orange Discoloration of the Upper Eyelids: A Quiz. 21384089 2011 07 25 2012 01 02 1651-2057 91 2 2011 Mar Acta dermato-venereologica Acta Derm. Venereol. Bilateral orange discoloration of the upper eyelids: a quiz. 211-2 10.2340/00015555-0910 Kluger Nicolas N Guillot Bernard B eng Case Reports Journal Article Sweden Acta Derm Venereol 0370310 0001-5555 IM Eyelids pathology Female Humans Middle Aged Skin Diseases diagnosis Skin Pigmentation 2011 3 9 6 0 2011 3 9 6 0 2011 7 26 6 0

2011 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

62. PRODUCTION OF HEMORRHAGIC NECROTIC SKIN LESIONS IN THE RABBIT BY MEANS OF HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE AND HEMOPHILUS PERTUSSIS Full Text available with Trip Pro

PRODUCTION OF HEMORRHAGIC NECROTIC SKIN LESIONS IN THE RABBIT BY MEANS OF HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE AND HEMOPHILUS PERTUSSIS 1. The intradermal injection of H. influenzae in the abdominal wall of rabbits induces inflammation, frequently combined with a central pustule. The corresponding injection of H. pertussis causes a bluish violet discoloration of the skin area involved which undergoes slight hemorrhagic necrotic changes within a few days. 2. The intravenous injection of living H. influenzae (...) , 24 hours after the intradermal inoculation with living H. influenzae, is able to transform the respective skin areas into severe hemorrhagic necrotic lesions within 3 to 5 hours. 3. Heat-killed H. influenzae, if injected intravenously, may produce hemorrhagic-necrotic lesions in areas previously prepared with living or heat-killed H. influenzae. 4. H. pertussis, if injected intravenously, may cause, perhaps to a lesser extent, hemorrhagic necrotic lesions in skin areas 24 hours previously

1937 The Journal of experimental medicine

63. Facial skin-lightening benefits of the tetrapeptide Pro-Lys-Glu-Lys on subjects with skin types V-VI living in South Africa. Full Text available with Trip Pro

was significantly superior to the vehicle at 12 weeks on overall appearance (P < 0.05) and evenness of skin tone (P < 0.01).The tetrapeptide, PKEK, has proven skin-lightening benefits on skin discoloration from melasma and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. These studies have been conducted on subjects with skin types V-VI living in South Africa, but we believe this technology to be suitable for all racial groups.© 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (...) Facial skin-lightening benefits of the tetrapeptide Pro-Lys-Glu-Lys on subjects with skin types V-VI living in South Africa. Irregular skin pigmentation may be a substantial contributor to the signs of aging and to a person's lack of psychological well-being. Although a large number of skin-lightening agents are available, the opportunity exists to identify more efficacious agents, agents that target alternative biological mechanisms.To provide clinical evidence of the skin-lightening effect

2011 Journal of cosmetic dermatology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

64. Comparison of standardized peristomal skin care and crusting technique in prevention of peristomal skin problems in ostomy patients. Full Text available with Trip Pro

. A total of 81 ostomates, who were recruited from a tertiary hospital, completed the baseline, 1-month, 2-month, and 3-month follow-up (SPSC group, n=45; CT group, n=36). SPSC consisted of water cleansing and direct application of ostomy appliances. CT involved crusting hydrocolloid powder and patting with water sponge or protective barrier liquid film. The outcomes of the study were assessed by skin problems, such as discoloration, erosion and tissue overgrowth; the domains of the evaluation tool used (...) in examining the peristomal skin. A generalized estimating equation model was used to examine the effects according to time and group.In both SPSC and CT groups, the likelihood of occurrence of discoloration (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.61-2.46), erosion (OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.55-2.25) and tissue enlargement (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.36-2.77) increased with time. There was no significant difference in discoloration between the groups, whereas the probability of erosion (OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.89) and tissue overgrowth

2011 Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Controlled trial quality: uncertain

65. Cyanoacrylate glue occlusion for varicose veins

are a sign of underlying venous insufficiency. Primary valvular incompetence is the most common underlying cause of varicose veins. The saphenous veins are the most frequently affected vessels. Most people with varicose veins have no symptoms, but venous insufficiency may cause fatigue, heaviness, aching, throbbing, itching and cramps in the legs. Chronic venous insufficiency can lead to skin discoloration, inflammatory dermatitis and ulceration. Current treatments Current treatments 2.2 NICE's guideline

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

66. Canadian guideline for Parkinson disease

inherited forms of it, Lewy body inclusion may be absent in surviving neurons. Moreover, expecting neuropathological assessment of brain tissue for diagnostic purposes is not realistic in living patients; in the future, peripheral organ biopsy (e.g., skin) may serve as a surrogate marker of brain pathology. Of note, up to 20% of patients diagnosed in life with typical Parkinson disease have an alternative diagnosis at autopsy. Given the potential error in making a diagnosis of Parkinson disease

2019 CPG Infobase

67. Neonatal jaundice

includes phototherapy and/or exchange transfusion. The major complication of unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is kernicterus. Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood. A neonate refers to an infant in the first 28 days of life. This topic focuses on recognising and managing early neonatal jaundice, which is most commonly caused by unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. While prolonged

2019 BMJ Best Practice

68. Actinomycosis

soft-tissue swelling multiple sinuses skin discoloration chewing difficulties constitutional symptoms change in bowel habits abdominal discomfort nausea and vomiting sensation of abdominal mass vaginal bleeding or discharge dry or productive cough blood-streaked sputum shortness of breath chest pain focal neurological defects male gender injury or inflammation of the oral cavity diabetes mellitus immunosuppression malnutrition local tissue damage by neoplasia, trauma, or irradiation intra-uterine

2019 BMJ Best Practice

69. Management of Poisoning

individuals or in those with coronary and cerebral arterial disease (pg 77). Grade D, Level 4 D Urinary acidi? cation (urine pH 4 mL. Grade D, Level 3 C If the accidental ingestion occurred >12 hours (24 hours for enteric-coated tablets) and the patient is asymptomatic, no further evaluation is required (pg 100). Grade C, Level 2+ Mucocutaneous and ocular salicylate exposure D For asymptomatic patients with dermal exposures to methyl salicylate or salicylic acid, the skin should be thoroughly washed (...) is controversial (pg 195). Grade D, Level 3 GPP Individuals who are aware they are allergic to stings should be advised to carry epinephrine auto injector (pg 195). GPP35 GPP Immunotherapy is indicated in adults and children who had life threatening reactions to bee or wasp stings including cardiovascular and respiratory symptoms, provided that either skin test or serum IgE is positive (pg 195). GPP Marine Envenomation D Resuscitate and manage cardiorespiratory arrest (from stone? sh, stingray, jelly? sh, blue

2020 Ministry of Health, Singapore

70. Treatment of Patients with Schizophrenia

medical illness) • Exposure to physical, sexual, or emotional trauma • Exposure to violence or aggressive behavior, including combat exposure or childhood abuse • Legal or disciplinary consequences of past aggressive behaviors Examination, Including Mental Status Examination • General appearance and nutritional status • Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) • Vital signs • Skin, including any stigmata of trauma, self-injury, or drug use • Coordination and gait • Involuntary movements

2020 American Psychiatric Association

71. Special Topics in Venous Thromboembolism

by phlegmasia alba dolens, which is characterized by the same clinical signs except the limb is pale and white due to early ischemia, and not yet cyanotic. Venous gangrene is defined as skin necrosis, discoloration, and documented VTE. Initial treatment for PCD or venous gangrene is the same as for proximal DVT with an emphasis on immediate anticoagulation and vascular surgical consultation. Early thrombus removal is the treatment of choice in patients with limb-threatening venous ischemia due (...) to iliofemoral venous thrombosis, with or without associated femoro-popliteal venous thrombosis. 1-3 These patients require thrombolysis when characterized by all of the following: ? Massive painful limb swelling, with or without cyanosis ? Skin blisters or necrosis ? Loss of or diminished arterial pulses Aggressive therapies for phlegmasia include both venous thrombectomy and thrombolysis. If the patient does not respond to initial extremity elevation, fluid resuscitation, and aggressive systemic

2020 University of Michigan Health System

73. Kwashiorkor

in addition to oedema. Kwashiorkor typically occurs in children around the time of weaning and up to 4 years of age, although it may present later, particularly when associated with tuberculosis (TB) or HIV. Oedema of kwashiorkor is evident in the soft tissues of the extremities, rather than as ascites. History and exam presence of risk factors low weight for height, low height for age, or a low mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) bilateral pitting oedema hair discoloration dermatosis/ulceration apathy (...) serum protein serum albumin blood glucose chest x-ray (CXR) urine culture blood culture stool culture tuberculosis (TB) skin testing HIV serology/polymerase chain reaction (PCR) malaria screen echocardiography Treatment algorithm ACUTE Contributors Authors Helene B. Roberson Professor of Pediatrics Washington University School of Medicine St Louis MO Disclosures MJM is an author of a number of references cited in this monograph. Medical Director Lao Friends Hospital for Children Luang Prabang Laos

2018 BMJ Best Practice

74. Actinomycosis

soft-tissue swelling multiple sinuses skin discoloration chewing difficulties constitutional symptoms change in bowel habits abdominal discomfort nausea and vomiting sensation of abdominal mass vaginal bleeding or discharge dry or productive cough blood-streaked sputum shortness of breath chest pain focal neurological defects male gender injury or inflammation of the oral cavity diabetes mellitus immunosuppression malnutrition local tissue damage by neoplasia, trauma, or irradiation intra-uterine

2018 BMJ Best Practice

75. Anatomical penile abnormalities

prepuce penile curvature and/or torsion recent genital examination or procedure history of short or small penis penile pain and swelling foreskin adherent to glans penile adhesions and smegma penile cicatrix penile glans oedema prominent pre-pubic fat pad presence of hernia or hydrocele forced retraction of foreskin dyspareunia recent penile trauma history of balanitis or balanoposthitis urinary obstruction or retention necrosis of penile skin discoloration of glans penile length discrepancy history (...) that often presents as a genital mass present with urination in the newborn. It is characterised by excessive inner preputial skin with a tight phimotic ring, leading to severe ballooning of the penile skin and scrotum with urination. [Figure caption and citation for the preceding image starts]: Congenital penile curvature (congenital chordee) From the collection of Nicol Corbin Bush, MD [Citation ends]. [Figure caption and citation for the preceding image starts]: Infant with distal hypospadias

2018 BMJ Best Practice

76. Kwashiorkor

in addition to oedema. Kwashiorkor typically occurs in children around the time of weaning and up to 4 years of age, although it may present later, particularly when associated with tuberculosis (TB) or HIV. Oedema of kwashiorkor is evident in the soft tissues of the extremities, rather than as ascites. History and exam presence of risk factors low weight for height, low height for age, or a low mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) bilateral pitting oedema hair discoloration dermatosis/ulceration apathy (...) serum protein serum albumin blood glucose chest x-ray (CXR) urine culture blood culture stool culture tuberculosis (TB) skin testing HIV serology/polymerase chain reaction (PCR) malaria screen echocardiography Treatment algorithm ACUTE Contributors Authors Helene B. Roberson Professor of Pediatrics Washington University School of Medicine St Louis MO Disclosures MJM is an author of a number of references cited in this monograph. Medical Director Lao Friends Hospital for Children Luang Prabang Laos

2018 BMJ Best Practice

77. Gangrene

oedema skin discoloration crepitus (gas gangrene) diminished pedal pulses and ankle-brachial index (ischaemic gangrene) low-grade fever and chills (infectious gangrene) diabetes mellitus atherosclerosis (ischaemic gangrene) smoking (ischaemic gangrene) renal disease drug and alcohol abuse malignancy trauma or abdominal surgery (infectious gangrene) contaminated wounds (infectious gangrene) malnutrition (infectious gangrene) hypercoagulable states (ischaemic gangrene) prolonged application (...) of tourniquets (ischaemic gangrene) Diagnostic investigations FBC comprehensive metabolic panel serum LDH coagulation panel blood cultures serum C-reactive protein plain x-rays CT of affected site MRI of affected site Doppler ultrasonography surgical exploration and skin biopsy CT angiography magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) CT chest and abdomen ANA, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, and anti beta2 glycoprotein-1 antibodies serum cold agglutinins serum cryofibrinogens plasma cryoglobulin Treatment

2018 BMJ Best Practice

78. Frostbite

the viability of the injured tissue and surgery should normally be delayed. Risk factors for amputation include severe injury grades, late presentation, lower extremity involvement, and wound infection. Definition Frostbite is an injury produced by tissue freezing following exposure to cold. Frostbite requires temperatures of 0°C (32°F) or colder to occur. History and exam presence of risk factors cold or numbness of affected extremity pain during rewarming purplish skin discoloration white or yellow skin (...) plaque superficial skin vesiculation deep purple blisters tissue necrosis and mummification (dry gangrene) erythema joint dislocation fractures cold exposure previous frostbite vascular insufficiency high altitude hypoxia alcohol tobacco dehydration extremity trauma constrictive clothing or equipment Diagnostic investigations clinical diagnosis technetium-99 pertechnetate scintigraphy magnetic resonance angiogram of affected extremity plain radiography thermography and duplex imaging Treatment

2018 BMJ Best Practice

79. Necrotising fasciitis

). History and exam presence of risk factors anaesthesia or severe pain over site of cellulitis fever palpitations, tachycardia, tachypnoea, hypotension, and lightheadedness nausea and vomiting delirium crepitus vesicles or bullae grey discoloration of skin oedema or induration location of lesion inpatient contact with index case Varicella zoster infection cutaneous injury, surgery, trauma non-traumatic skin lesions intravenous drug use chronic illness immunosuppression non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (...) , and subcutaneous tissue infections. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett’s principles and practice of infectious diseases. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2015:1194-215. Stevens DL, Bisno AL, Chambers HF, et al. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Jul 15;59(2):e10-52. https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/59/2/e10/2895845 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

2018 BMJ Best Practice

80. Neonatal jaundice

includes phototherapy and/or exchange transfusion. The major complication of unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is kernicterus. Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood. A neonate refers to an infant in the first 28 days of life. This topic focuses on recognising and managing early neonatal jaundice, which is most commonly caused by unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. While prolonged

2018 BMJ Best Practice

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