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Skin Abscess

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141. A case of obturator hernia leading to right thigh abscess in China (PubMed)

A case of obturator hernia leading to right thigh abscess in China The purpose of this case is to investigate a case of obturator hernia leading to right thigh abscess on 68-year-old woman of China. A 68-year-old Chinese woman was referred to China-Japan Friendship Hospital of Jilin University with abdominal pain, bloating, exhaust, stop defecation in 2011. She had chronic bronchitis, emphysema with a history of 20 years. This patient did not have any bad habits, such as smoking, alcohol (...) consumption, etc. In this surgery, CT was used to diagnose the basic condition of the patient. Surgery was used for treatment of patients with diseases. In addition, this operation was performed by the china-Japan Friendship Hospital of Jilin University. The results of this case showed that the cervix of rectal right anterior wall can hit a funicular neoplasm, toughening, smooth, with tenderness, considering for the external pressure bowel loops. The inside of the right thigh showed obvious swelling, skin

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2016 International journal of surgery case reports

142. Packing Versus no Packing for Cutaneous Abscess

: 2016052 First Posted: July 4, 2016 Last Update Posted: October 11, 2018 Last Verified: October 2018 Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement: Plan to Share IPD: No Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Abscess Skin Diseases Suppuration Infection Inflammation Pathologic Processes (...) Packing Versus no Packing for Cutaneous Abscess Packing Versus no Packing for Cutaneous Abscess - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Packing Versus no Packing for Cutaneous Abscess The safety

2016 Clinical Trials

143. Loop Drainage: Effectiveness in Treating Cutaneous Abscesses

and less painful in the adult population, then it should be considered as a potential preferred I&D method for cutaneous abscess in the ED. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Abscess of Skin and/or Subcutaneous Tissue Procedure: Traditional Incision and Drainage. Procedure: Loop drainage Not Applicable Detailed Description: Patients who meet study criteria for treatment of a simple cutaneous abscess and desire to be a part of this study, will be consented. Study subjects will be enrolled (...) : Layout table for MeSH terms Abscess Skin Diseases Suppuration Infection Inflammation Pathologic Processes

2016 Clinical Trials

144. Negative pressure wound therapy aids recovery following surgical debridement due to severe bacterial cellulitis with abdominal abscess post-cesarean: A case report (CARE-Compliant). (PubMed)

Negative pressure wound therapy aids recovery following surgical debridement due to severe bacterial cellulitis with abdominal abscess post-cesarean: A case report (CARE-Compliant). Bacterial cellulitis post-Cesarean section is rare. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used in various medical specialities; its effectiveness in obstetrics however remains the topic of debate-used predominantly as an adjunct to secondary intention specific to high-risk patient groups. Its application (...) in the treatment of actively infected wounds post-Cesarean is not well documented. Here, we document NPWT in the treatment of an unusually severe case of bacterial cellulitis with abdominal abscess postpartum. We provide a unique photographic timeline of wound progression following major surgical debridement, documenting the effectiveness of 2 different NPWT systems (RENASYS GO and PICO, Smith & Nephew). We report problems encountered using these NPWT systems and "ad-hoc" solutions to improve efficacy

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2016 Medicine

145. Factors influencing drainage setting and cost for cutaneous abscesses among pediatric patients. (PubMed)

Factors influencing drainage setting and cost for cutaneous abscesses among pediatric patients. To evaluate the clinical and microbiological factors associated with skin and soft tissue infections drained in the emergency department (ED) vs operative drainage (OD) in a tertiary care children's hospital.This was a cross-sectional study among children aged 2 months to 17 years who required incision and drainage (I&D). Demographic information, signs and symptoms, abscess size and location (...) , and wound culture/susceptibility were recorded. Patient-specific charges were collected from the billing database. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine factors determining setting for I&D and the effect of abscess drainage location on cost.Of 335 abscesses, 241 (71.9%) were drained in the ED. OD for abscesses was favored in children with prior history of abscess (odds ratio [OR], 3.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-7.44; P = .01) and labial location (OR, 37.81; 95% CI, 8.12-176.03

2016 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

146. Management lacrimal sac abscesses using lacrimal probe and crawford silicon tube. (PubMed)

Management lacrimal sac abscesses using lacrimal probe and crawford silicon tube. Treatment of lacrimal sac abscess of the traditional surgical approach may result in complications from cutaneous fistula formation, damage the sac, cause skin scarring and even have the potential for inducing cicatricial ectropion. We designed a new treatment scheme that is expected to achieve internal drainage with the use of lacrimal probe and crawford silicon tube.A prospective study was performed (...) for the management of lacrimal sac abscesses. All suitable patients from January 2011 to June 2014 were managed by lacrimal probe and crawford tube insertion. Postoperatively, patients received 0.5% Levofloxacin eye drops four times per day and oral Levofloxacin tablets 0.5 g once per day for four days. Follow-up times were for more than three months after removing the Crawford tube. The condition of the lacrimal sac and the patient's symptoms were carefully evaluated.Fourteen patients suffering from lacrimal

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2016 BMC Ophthalmology

147. Abscesses, hematomas, and cellulitis, oh my!

Abscesses, hematomas, and cellulitis, oh my! Abscesses, hematomas, and cellulitis, oh my! : EDE Blog • December 6, 2016 • I used to think that hematomas and abscesses were pretty straightforward to diagnose clinically. But I have had several cases that proved my initial suspicion to be wrong. Certainly the literature suggests we could do better differentiating cellulitis, DVT, and abscesses. I saw a patient who presented after knee surgery with a hot, swollen and painful calf that looked (...) exactly like a DVT. Ultrasound was not available so I followed the usual protocol of ordering low molecular weight heparin and arranging an elective the next morning to rule out DVT. Unfortunately the patient had a post-op hemorrhage into the muscle rather than a DVT, so the empiric treatment was less than ideal. I watched a surgeon I & D what he thought was an abscess despite my POCUS showing flow. It turned out to be a tiny pseudo-aneurysm. Ouch! Patients getting day three of their IV antibiotics

2016 EDE Blog

148. Briefs: Do we need antibiotics after I&D of a cutaneous abscess? (Re-post)

antibiotics were not required for resolution in most pediatric skin abscesses after I&D. So, as you can see the evidence is not 100% convincing either way, but it seems that treatment failure rates are not appreciably different with or without antibiotics. This obviously doesn’t completely answer the question, and certainly there are some situations where antibiotics are more likely to be beneficial than others. Let’s therefore turn our attention to the and the . Here’s what the panel of experts (...) whether or not the child truly needs antibiotics. Use your time wisely and explain what an abscess is and why a walled-off collection of pus is inaccessible to antibiotics. If the child has any of the following you should choose a MRSA active drug while simultaneously considering local resistance patterns: The abscess itself is >5 cm Multiple lesions Extensive surrounding cellulitis Associated comorbidities or immunosuppression Systemic signs of infection (fever due to the skin infection alone) Body

2016 PEM Blog

149. Reducing pain during incision and drainage of abscesses

mg/kg with epi) and aim just deep enough to create a subtle wheal and to hit the junction point of the local nerve fibers. Insert a 27 to 30 gauge needle at an oblique angle just under the epidermis a small distance away from the edge of the abscess (avoid injecting into the abscess which can be painful and ineffective). Inject in a ring around the abscess, going through already-numb skin when possible (this is where the topical 4% lidocaine helps). From AAFP “Regional Anesthesia for Office (...) Reducing pain during incision and drainage of abscesses Reducing pain during incision and drainage of abscesses – PEMBlog Search for: Search for: Reducing pain during incision and drainage of abscesses Performing incision and drainage on an abscess is painful for the patient. I realize that is as obvious a statement as I could possibly make. I wanted to briefly touch on some of the many interventions that you can use to decrease pain during I&D. Before the procedure Consider factors

2016 PEM Blog

150. Dermatophyte abscesses caused by Trichophyton rubrum in a patient without pre-existing superficial dermatophytosis: a case report. (PubMed)

Dermatophyte abscesses caused by Trichophyton rubrum in a patient without pre-existing superficial dermatophytosis: a case report. Trichophyton usually causes a superficial skin infection, affecting the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum. In immunocompromised patients, deeper invasion into the dermis and even severe systemic infection with distant organ involvement can occur. Most cases of deeper dermal dermatophytosis described in the literature so far involved pre-existing (...) dextrose agar. Histopathology showed organizing abscesses with degenerated fungal hyphae. After the 12-week oral itraconazole therapy, the lesions were completely resolved.Dermatophytes should be considered as a possible cause of deep soft tissue abscesses in immunocompromised patients, even though there is no superficial dermatophytosis lesion.

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2016 BMC Infectious Diseases

151. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence (PubMed)

PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part (...) have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA) with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies.

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2016 Case reports in infectious diseases

152. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV (PubMed)

Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess

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2016 ACG case reports journal

153. Male Breast Abscess Secondary to Actinomycosis: A Case Report (PubMed)

Male Breast Abscess Secondary to Actinomycosis: A Case Report Primary breast actinomycosis is a rare condition that has been previously reported in the female breast. Male breast infection is uncommon and most often associated with trauma to the skin or predisposing conditions like diabetes. We report the first case to our knowledge of primary breast actinomycosis in the male breast caused by Actinomycesneuii (A. neuii), a rare strain of Actinomyces. Mammography demonstrated periareolar skin

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2016 Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR

154. Perianal Abscess

Perianal Abscess Perianal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Perianal Abscess Perianal Abscess Aka: Perianal (...) Abscess From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Represents 60% of III. Pathophysiology Local adjacent to anal verge IV. Signs Superficial tender fluctuant perianal mass Immediately adjacent to anal verge Abscess limited to perianal subcutaneous tissue Digital exam red flags for deep space infection (consider CT and surgery ) Significant intolerance to rectal exam (chandelier sign) Bogginess, tenderness, induration superior to the anal sphincter (supralevator space) Fistula opening with drainage V

2018 FP Notebook

155. Pelvirectal Abscess

Pelvirectal Abscess Pelvirectal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pelvirectal Abscess Pelvirectal Abscess Aka (...) : Pelvirectal Abscess , Supralevator Abscess From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology spread to above levator ani muscle III. Causes Ruptured IV. Symptoms Back Pain V. Signs VI. Differential Diagnosis High VII. Imaging CT VIII. Labs : IX. Diagnosis: Rectal mucosa fullness on diagnostic testing or X. Management See Colorectal surgery Surgical drainage via intraanal incision XI. References Marx (2002) Rosen's Emergency Medicine, p. 1952 Roberts (1998) Procedures, Saunders, p. 649-51 Images: Related links

2018 FP Notebook

156. Ischiorectal Abscess

Ischiorectal Abscess Ischiorectal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ischiorectal Abscess Ischiorectal Abscess (...) Aka: Ischiorectal Abscess From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Represents 25% of III. Pathophysiology involving ischiorectal space Anatomic boundaries Lateral to external sphincter Below levator ani IV. Signs: Low Abscess See Infection of fatty tissue below Perianal tenderness and swelling 2-3 cm from anal verge V. Differential Diagnosis High Abscess Low Abscess (immediately adjacent to anal verge) VI. Radiology: Intrarectal Ultrasound Evaluation of complex or suspected high abscess VII

2018 FP Notebook

157. Intersphincteric Abscess

Intersphincteric Abscess Intersphincteric Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Intersphincteric Abscess (...) Intersphincteric Abscess Aka: Intersphincteric Abscess From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology within anal spincter wall III. Signs Tender mass in rectal mucosa IV. Management See Surgical referral for drainage under anesthesia V. Differential Diagnosis High VI. References Marx (2002) Rosen's Emergency Medicine, p. 1952 Roberts (1998) Procedures, Saunders, p. 649-51 Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Intersphincteric Abscess

2018 FP Notebook

158. Perirectal Abscess

Perirectal Abscess Perirectal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Perirectal Abscess Perirectal Abscess Aka (...) anal sphincter (25%) Inferior to levator ani Two to 3 cm from anal verge ( ) Abscess superior to levator ani Complicated, deep abscess spread from perianal, intersphincter and es May also spread from (PID, , Ruptured ) V. Risk Factors Pregnancy VI. Symptoms Constant, throbbing perianal pain VII. Signs: General Palpable, tender mass in perianal area or in Drainage may be seen via perianal skin tract See VIII. Imaging CT Indicated for evaluation of deep space or complicated abscess ( ) MRI Indicated

2018 FP Notebook

159. Pancreatic Abscess

Pancreatic Abscess Pancreatic Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pancreatic Abscess Pancreatic Abscess Aka (...) : Pancreatic Abscess From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Complication of III. Associated Conditions IV. Etiology (most common cause) V. Signs Rapid deterioration following VI. Labs (CBC) VII. Diagnosis CT-guided needle aspiration VIII. Management Surgical drainage of abscess Antibiotics Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Pancreatic Abscess." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new

2018 FP Notebook

160. Liver Abscess

Liver Abscess Liver Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Liver Abscess Liver Abscess Aka: Liver Abscess , Hepatic (...) Abscess From Related Chapters II. Causes Aerobic species ( ) ( ) III. Pathophysiology Sources infection Systemic bacteremia Direct extension Ruptured Peptic Ulcer Empyema Majority of abscesses are single Subacute onset over weeks IV. Symptoms Chills Weight loss (50%) Pain may radiate to right V. Signs Right upper quadrant tenderness VI. Labs (CBC) abnormalities increased (AST) elevated (ALT) elevated s (50% sensitive) VII. Radiology Abdominal XRay Right diaphragm elevated or Fluid filled masses VIII

2018 FP Notebook

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