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Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency

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1. Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency

Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Aka: Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency , Dermatologic findings in chemical dependency II. Findings "Pop" Scars from s (esp. , ) Abscesses, Infections, or Ulcerations Infective or chemical reactions Dominant thumb is burned in crack abuse (lighter) Paint or oil stains ( ) Clothing Skin s Skin tracks or related scars Marks are multiple, hyperpigmented and linear New lesions may

2018 FP Notebook

2. Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency

Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency Aka: Skin changes suggestive of chemical dependency , Dermatologic findings in chemical dependency II. Findings "Pop" Scars from s (esp. , ) Abscesses, Infections, or Ulcerations Infective or chemical reactions Dominant thumb is burned in crack abuse (lighter) Paint or oil stains ( ) Clothing Skin s Skin tracks or related scars Marks are multiple, hyperpigmented and linear New lesions may

2015 FP Notebook

3. SARCOMERE LENGTH DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN CTNC AND CTNI IN SKINNED PAPILLARY MUSCLE STRIPS (PubMed)

SARCOMERE LENGTH DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN CTNC AND CTNI IN SKINNED PAPILLARY MUSCLE STRIPS Sarcomere length dependent activation (LDA) of myocardial force development is the cellular basis underlying the Frank-Starling law of the heart, but it is still elusive how the sarcomeres detect the length changes and convert them into altered activation of thin filament. In this study we investigated how the C-domain of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) functionally and structurally responds (...) to the comprehensive effects of the Ca(2+), crossbridge, and sarcomere length of chemically skinned myocardial preparations. Using our in situ technique which allows for simultaneous measurements of time-resolved FRET and mechanical force of the skinned myocardial preparations, we measured changes in the FRET distance between cTnI(167C) and cTnC(89C), labeled with FRET donor and acceptor, respectively, as a function of [Ca(2+)], crossbridge state and sarcomere length of the skinned muscle preparations. Our results

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2016 Archives of biochemistry and biophysics

4. Effect of a Basic Skin Care Product on the Structural Strength of the Skin

changes also affecting the skin. The skin fulfills a variety of protective and regulatory functions. Compared to other organs, the skin is constantly exposed to harmful environmental influences. Besides intrinsic factors these external factors may accelerate skin aging. Due to its ageing-related loss of functional capacity the skin becomes susceptible to develop adverse skin conditions and dermatological diseases (e.g. skin dryness, fungal infections). Especially old aged, care depended, and severely (...) ill individuals are at high risk for developing severe skin injuries and wounds (e.g. decubitus, skin tears) with high social and economic impact. Empirical evidence indicates that the reduced adhesion of the dermal-epidermal junction is a major pathophysiological predictor for these types of injuries. The suction blister model is an artificial and controlled technique for dermal-epidermal separation along the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). Empirical evidence suggests that the time of the dermal

2018 Clinical Trials

5. Chemical Exposures During Pregnancy

to the pre–intervention levels. Importantly, individual’s internal tissue exposure to chemicals is also likely to be affected by variations in the gut microbiota, 14 which are probably dependent on an individual’s diet and health. 6. Personal care products and household chemicals Another important source of chemical exposures for women is cosmetics/personal care products, 15 especially those applied to the skin over a large surface area to facilitate their absorption; moisturisers, sunscreens, cosmetics (...) , reported the presence of 5 different phthalates despite no mention of phthalates in their ingredients. 18 A product favoured and rated by a popular environmental health website that was marketed for babies, children and adults with sensitive skin was also examined. In this product, phthalates were also the most common type of chemical to be found in the inactive ingredients. An increased use of baby care products such as lotions, powders and shampoo is associated with higher exposure to phthalates

2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

6. Skin Resurfacing: Chemical Peels

. Normal wound healing and skin rejuvenation follow, while complications such as scarring and pigmentary changes are minimized. Next: Indications The indications for a chemical peel, since it is largely a cosmetic procedure, depend on the patient's tolerances and wishes for correcting skin textural problems. Many individuals do not wish to improve skin texture despite severe problems, and others desire marked improvement in relatively minor problem areas. Treatments vary with the severity (...) for chemical peels. Sun-damaged skin shows epidermal changes, elastosis, and collagen distortion in the midreticular dermis. To eradicate photodamage, deep peels are required. More superficial peels, even when performed in repetitive fashion, do not reach the affected histological level and therefore have a minimal effect on photodamaged skin. Smoking Patients must understand the necessity for smoking cessation. The dynamic action of puffing can worsen perioral rhytides, and the chemicals in the smoke can

2014 eMedicine Surgery

7. Skin Resurfacing, Chemical Peels

. Normal wound healing and skin rejuvenation follow, while complications such as scarring and pigmentary changes are minimized. Next: Indications The indications for a chemical peel, since it is largely a cosmetic procedure, depend on the patient's tolerances and wishes for correcting skin textural problems. Many individuals do not wish to improve skin texture despite severe problems, and others desire marked improvement in relatively minor problem areas. Treatments vary with the severity (...) for chemical peels. Sun-damaged skin shows epidermal changes, elastosis, and collagen distortion in the midreticular dermis. To eradicate photodamage, deep peels are required. More superficial peels, even when performed in repetitive fashion, do not reach the affected histological level and therefore have a minimal effect on photodamaged skin. Smoking Patients must understand the necessity for smoking cessation. The dynamic action of puffing can worsen perioral rhytides, and the chemicals in the smoke can

2014 eMedicine Surgery

8. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

(including the squamous cell and basal cell layers), dermis, subcutaneous tissue, and other parts of the skin. Risk Factors Risk factors for nonmelanoma skin cancer include the following: Sun and UV radiation exposure (including tanning beds). Epidemiologic evidence suggests that cumulative exposure to UV radiation and the sensitivity of an individual’s skin to UV radiation are risk factors for skin cancer, though the type of exposure (i.e., high-intensity exposure and short-duration exposure vs. chronic (...) ) References Reszko A, Aasi SZ, Wilson LD, et al.: Cancer of the skin. In: DeVita VT Jr, Lawrence TS, Rosenberg SA: Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011, pp 1610-33. Athas WF, Hunt WC, Key CR: Changes in nonmelanoma skin cancer incidence between 1977-1978 and 1998-1999 in Northcentral New Mexico. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 12 (10): 1105-8, 2003. [ ] Harris RB, Griffith K, Moon TE: Trends in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers

2017 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

9. Skin biopsy: punch method

. The local anaesthetic used should be prescribed and checked according to the Medicines Administration Policy ( ). Positioning the child Whilst maintaining the dignity of the child, place the child in a comfortable position with the potential biopsy area exposed. Positioning of the child will depend on the site of the skin biopsy. Negotiate with the child and family the position of the child whilst ensuring the child is comfortable whilst the biopsy site is accessible. Encourage the parents to distract (...) , which should include a discussion of when the child can return to their normal activities ( ). An outpatient’s appointment must be given to family ( ). The child and family must be informed of the results of the procedure as soon as possible, although they should be advised it can take six to eight weeks to grow the skin cells and a further six to eight weeks for the biopsy results to be available dependant on the nature of analysis of the biopsy ( ). This discussion must be recorded in the child’s

2014 Great Ormond Street Hospital

10. Psychophysical and vasomotor evidence for interdependency of TRPA1 and TRPV1 nociceptive responses in human skin: an experimental study. (PubMed)

), delivered by 12 mm Finn chambers. Evoked pain intensities were recorded during pretreatments and chemical provocations. Quantitative sensory tests were performed before and after provocations to assess changes of heat pain sensitivity. Imaging of vasomotor responses was used to assess neurogenic inflammation after the chemical provocations. In the capsaicin-pretreated areas, both the subsequent 1% capsaicin- and 10% AITC-provoked pain was inhibited by 92.9 ± 2.5% and 86.9 ± 5.0% (both: P < 0.001 (...) ), respectively. The capsaicin-ablated skin areas showed significant heat hypoalgesia at baseline (P < 0.001) as well as heat antihyperalgesia, and inhibition of neurogenic inflammation evoked by both 1% capsaicin and 10% AITC provocations (both: P < 0.001). Ablation of cutaneous capsaicin-sensitive afferents caused consistent and equal inhibition of both TRPV1- and TRPA1-provoked responses assessed psychophysically and by imaging of vasomotor responses. This study suggests that TRPA1 nociceptive responses

2018 Pain

11. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

(including the squamous cell and basal cell layers), dermis, subcutaneous tissue, and other parts of the skin. Risk Factors Risk factors for nonmelanoma skin cancer include the following: Sun and UV radiation exposure (including tanning beds). Epidemiologic evidence suggests that cumulative exposure to UV radiation and the sensitivity of an individual’s skin to UV radiation are risk factors for skin cancer, though the type of exposure (i.e., high-intensity exposure and short-duration exposure vs. chronic (...) ) References Reszko A, Aasi SZ, Wilson LD, et al.: Cancer of the skin. In: DeVita VT Jr, Lawrence TS, Rosenberg SA: Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011, pp 1610-33. Athas WF, Hunt WC, Key CR: Changes in nonmelanoma skin cancer incidence between 1977-1978 and 1998-1999 in Northcentral New Mexico. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 12 (10): 1105-8, 2003. [ ] Harris RB, Griffith K, Moon TE: Trends in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

12. Pilot Study Assessing the Effect of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors on Body Composition in Patients With ER+/HER2- Metastatic Breast Cancer

with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors (abemaciclib, ribociclib, or palbociclib). Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Breast Cancer Diagnostic Test: CT scans Diagnostic Test: DEXA scan Detailed Description: The goal of this study is to evaluate changes in body composition among patients who are treated with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors (abemaciclib, ribociclib, or palbociclib). There is preliminary data suggesting that these drugs have more effect on body fat mass than (...) Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement: Plan to Share IPD: No Layout table for additional information Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No Keywords provided by Jesus Anampa Mesias, Montefiore Medical Center: cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors Body composition body fat mass metastatic ER+/HER2- breast cancer Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Breast Neoplasms Neoplasms by Site Neoplasms Breast Diseases Skin

2018 Clinical Trials

13. Myosin MgADP Release Rate Decreases as Sarcomere Length Increases in Skinned Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers (PubMed)

Myosin MgADP Release Rate Decreases as Sarcomere Length Increases in Skinned Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers Actin-myosin cross-bridges use chemical energy from MgATP hydrolysis to generate force and shortening in striated muscle. Previous studies show that increases in sarcomere length can reduce thick-to-thin filament spacing in skinned muscle fibers, thereby increasing force production at longer sarcomere lengths. However, it is unclear how changes in sarcomere length and lattice spacing affect (...) suggest that skeletal muscle exhibits sarcomere-length-dependent changes in cross-bridge kinetics and MgADP release that are separate from, or complementary to, changes in lattice spacing.Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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2016 Biophysical journal

14. VivaScope 1500 and 3000 imaging systems for detecting skin cancer lesions

to recreational behavioural change involving sun exposure and sunbeds (Cancer Research UK 2014). The incidence of melanoma is lower in lower socio-economic groups. 3.4 Melanoma can invade nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body. It is responsible for most skin cancer deaths; in the UK in 2010 there were approximately 2200 deaths and 12,818 new cases. Survival has improved substantially in recent decades and the survival rate is among the highest of any cancer, largely because of increased (...) in 2010. In men, most melanomas present on the trunk (41%), head and neck (22%) or arms (19%). In women the most common sites for presentation are legs (39%), arms (24%) and trunk (20%). 3.6 Melanomas may be classified into broad types (superficial spreading melanomas, nodular melanomas, lentigo maligna melanomas, acral lentiginous melanomas) depending on their growth characteristics, appearance and location on the body. Non-melanoma skin cancer Non-melanoma skin cancer 3.7 Non-melanoma skin cancers

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Diagnostics Guidance

15. Chemical Peels (Overview)

healing and skin rejuvenation follow, while complications such as scarring and pigmentary changes are minimized. Next: Indications The indications for a chemical peel, since it is largely a cosmetic procedure, depend on the patient's tolerances and wishes for correcting skin textural problems. Many individuals do not wish to improve skin texture despite severe problems, and others desire marked improvement in relatively minor problem areas. Treatments vary with the severity of the condition (...) shows epidermal changes, elastosis, and collagen distortion in the midreticular dermis. To eradicate photodamage, deep peels are required. More superficial peels, even when performed in repetitive fashion, do not reach the affected histological level and therefore have a minimal effect on photodamaged skin. Smoking Patients must understand the necessity for smoking cessation. The dynamic action of puffing can worsen perioral rhytides, and the chemicals in the smoke can cause enzymatic reactions

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Burns, Chemical

they come into contact with water, their ability to produce direct chemical changes on the skin accounts for most significant injury. Specific chemical changes depend on the agent, including acids, alkalis, corrosives, oxidizing and reducing agents, desiccants and vesicants, and protoplasmic poisons. The concentration of toxic agent and duration of its contact primarily determine the degree of skin destruction. When the skin is exposed to toxic chemicals, its keratinous covering is destroyed (...) have been recorded by the CPSC. As a result of this alarming problem, the CPSC currently proposes banning the sale of this product to consumers. For excellent patient education resources, visit eMedicineHealth's . Also, see eMedicineHealth's patient education articles and . Next: Pathophysiology Most chemical agents damage the skin by producing a chemical reaction rather than hyperthermic injury. Although some chemicals produce considerable heat as the result of an exothermic reaction when

2014 eMedicine Surgery

17. Skin Cancer, Nonmelanoma

the following: Sun and UV radiation exposure (including tanning beds). Epidemiologic evidence suggests that cumulative exposure to UV radiation and the sensitivity of an individual’s skin to UV radiation are risk factors for skin cancer, though the type of exposure (i.e., high-intensity exposure and short-duration exposure vs. chronic exposure) and pattern of exposure (i.e., continuous pattern vs. intermittent pattern) may differ among the three main skin cancer types.[ - ] Skin cancers are more common (...) , pp 1610-33. Athas WF, Hunt WC, Key CR: Changes in nonmelanoma skin cancer incidence between 1977-1978 and 1998-1999 in Northcentral New Mexico. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 12 (10): 1105-8, 2003. Harris RB, Griffith K, Moon TE: Trends in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers in southeastern Arizona, 1985-1996. J Am Acad Dermatol 45 (4): 528-36, 2001. Rogers HW, Weinstock MA, Harris AR, et al.: Incidence estimate of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the United States, 2006. Arch Dermatol 146 (3

2012 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

18. Skin, Congenital Hairy Nevi

large congenital nevi account for less than 0.1% of cutaneous melanomas, whereas small varieties of congenital nevi may account for 15% of cutaneous melanomas. Malignancy should be suspected with focal growth, pain, bleeding, ulceration, significant pigmentary change, or pruritus. Management and treatment of patients with CNN depends on the lesion’s size, location, and propensity for malignant transformation. Aesthetic considerations are important. Surgical treatment of giant or large CNN (...) confluence of dermal nevus cell nests and tracking along hair follicles. Courtesy of Carolyn F. Greeley, MD. A study by Salgado et al suggested that patients with large/giant CNN also have a higher density of mast cells in their skin, both in normal-appearing areas and in the nevi, than do individuals without such nevi. The investigators pointed out that the same stem cell factor that regulates/activates nevocytes is also involved in the differentiation/proliferation of mast cells and suggested

2014 eMedicine Surgery

19. Skin Malignancies, Squamous Cell Carcinoma

resistance through functional loss of TP53, a well-studied tumor suppressor gene. TP53 mutations are seen in over 90% of skin cancers diagnosed in the United States, as well as in most precursor skin lesions, suggesting that loss of TP53 is an early event in the development of cSCC. [ ] UVR causes deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage through the creation of pyrimidine dimers, a process known to result in the genetic mutation of TP53. Upon subsequent UVR exposure, keratinocytes undergo clonal expansion (...) response, leaving the skin susceptible to tumor formation. [ ] A number of surrogate indices of chronic UVR exposure from the sun are well known. Specifically, epidemiologic evidence suggests that geographic proximity to the equator, a history of precancerous lesions or prior skin cancers, older age, and male sex predispose an individual to the development of cSCC. Immunosuppression is also increasingly recognized as a risk factor for the development of skin cancer; this is true of iatrogenic

2014 eMedicine Surgery

20. Skin Malignancies, Basal Cell Carcinoma

skin cancer. A latency period of 20-50 years is typical between the time of ultraviolet (UV) damage and BCC clinical onset. The prevalence of BCC increases in areas of higher altitude and in areas of lower latitude. The incidence of BCC is rising, potentially because of atmospheric changes and the increased popularity of sunbathing. Radiation exposure that contributes to BCC development may also include tanning booths and UV light therapy. Both short-wavelength UVB radiation (290-320 nm, sunburn (...) rays) and longer wavelength UVA radiation (320-400 nm, tanning rays) contribute to the formation of BCC. UVB is believed to play a greater role in the development of BCC than UVA, however, and is the primary agent responsible for most skin cancer. [ ] UVB and UVC can modify unsaturated chemical bonds of nucleic acids, which may lead to mutations. UVC does not penetrate the atmospheric ozone layer. The UVA spectrum is absorbed by melanin and, through free-radical transfer, affects cellular

2014 eMedicine Surgery

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