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Skin Turgor

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1. Skin Turgor

Skin Turgor Skin Turgor Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Skin Turgor Skin Turgor Aka: Skin Turgor , Skin Tenting II (...) . Definition Skin Turgor Time required for skin to return to position prior to pinching Skin Tenting Skin maintains a pinched position for a prolonged period after pinching III. Protocol Pinch skin on the lateral abdominal wall at the level of the IV. Interpretation Normally, skin typically recoils to its original position instantly after being pinched Delay in return to normal suggests dehydration Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search

2018 FP Notebook

2. Decreased Skin Turgor. (PubMed)

Decreased Skin Turgor. 21268721 2011 02 04 2011 01 27 1533-4406 364 4 2011 Jan 27 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Images in clinical medicine: Decreased skin turgor. e6 10.1056/NEJMicm1005144 de Vries Feyens Cornelia C Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, 's-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands p.de.jager@jbz.nl de Jager Cornelis P C CP eng Case Reports Journal Article United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM Dehydration etiology pathology Diarrhea complications Elasticity Humans (...) Male Middle Aged Pancreatic Neoplasms complications Skin pathology Vipoma complications 2011 1 28 6 0 2011 1 28 6 0 2011 2 5 6 0 ppublish 21268721 10.1056/NEJMicm1005144

2011 NEJM

3. Skin Turgor

Skin Turgor Skin Turgor Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Skin Turgor Skin Turgor Aka: Skin Turgor , Skin Tenting II (...) . Definition Skin Turgor Time required for skin to return to position prior to pinching Skin Tenting Skin maintains a pinched position for a prolonged period after pinching III. Protocol Pinch skin on the lateral abdominal wall at the level of the IV. Interpretation Normally, skin typically recoils to its original position instantly after being pinched Delay in return to normal suggests dehydration Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search

2015 FP Notebook

4. Dressings and Care of Skin Graft Sites

Dressings and Care of Skin Graft Sites TITLE: Dressings and Care of Skin Graft Sites: A Review of Clinical Evidence and Guidelines DATE: 19 December 2013 CONTEXT AND POLICY ISSUES A skin graft is sheet of skin harvested from a donor site; it may include the epidermis and part of the dermis (split thickness skin graft) or both the epidermis and dermis (full thickness graft) to cover skin lost due to surgery or trauma. 1 Dressings are used to cover the donor site or the grafted skin; this is done (...) to enhance healing, improve patients’ comfort and reduce the pain. Skin dressings can be broadly classified into medicated and non-medicated dressings. 2 Medicated dressings include hydrocolloid dressings, hydrogel dressings. alginate dressings, fibrous absorbent dressings, dressings that contribute to odour management, antimicrobial dressings, and Manuka Honey dressings. 2 The non-medicated dressings include vapour permeable dressings, foam dressings, low adherent dressings, non-adherent wound contact

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

5. Autologous platelet-rich plasma versus readymade growth factors in skin rejuvenation: A split face study. (PubMed)

types II and III were enrolled in this study. They underwent a split face therapy where each side was randomly assigned to treatment by either readymade growth factors (area A) or autologous PRP (area B). All patients received six sessions at 2-weeks interval. Evaluation was carried out using Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Patients were followed up for 6 months.Both procedures yielded significant improvement regarding both GAIS (skin turgor (...) Autologous platelet-rich plasma versus readymade growth factors in skin rejuvenation: A split face study. The escalating urge for a youthful-looking skin instigates continuous innovations with minimally invasive procedures. Readymade growth factors and autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) represent such therapeutic interventions.Compare the efficacy and safety of PRP to readymade growth factors in skin rejuvenation.Twenty adult females with Fitzpatrick skin types III-IV and Glogau photoaging

2018 Journal of cosmetic dermatology

6. Radio Frequency Microneedling for Suprapatellar Skin

of elastin. Additionally, as humans age, skin tends to appear more dry due to its poor hydration and turgor capacity. The use of minimally invasive aesthetic treatments in reducing signs of aging has been gaining in popularity over surgical treatments in recent years. Several energy types including, laser, radiofrequency, infrared, and ultrasound, have been developed for facial rejuvenation. These treatments induce controlled thermal damage into the dermis and cause collagen contraction (...) Radio Frequency Microneedling for Suprapatellar Skin Radio Frequency Microneedling for Suprapatellar Skin - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Radio Frequency Microneedling for Suprapatellar Skin

2017 Clinical Trials

7. Clinical Evaluation of Day and Night Skin Care Creams Supplemented With MediCell Technology (MCT)'s Composition of Defensins and Supportive Molecules

turgor, hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, erythema and edema in Blinded Evaluator Skin Assessment (Exhibit 3). The evaluation will be performed in person by the blinded investigators. Subjects will complete a Consumer Questionnaire (Exhibit 4) at baseline, 6 week and 12 week visits. Weekly phone calls will be made or emails will be sent (+/- 1 week window) to remind subjects to fill out compliance log, use mask, emphasize cream is applied before the serum. Follow-up appointments reminders (...) 0 to 4 for skin radiancy [ Time Frame: Baseline and 12 weeks ] Skin Evaluation assessing change from baseline to 12 weeks using Scale from 0 to 4 for skin turgor [ Time Frame: Baseline and 12 weeks ] Skin Evaluation assessing change from baseline to 12 weeks using Scale from 0 to 4 for hyperpigmentation [ Time Frame: Baseline and 12 weeks ] Skin Evaluation assessing change from baseline to 12 weeks using Scale from 0 to 4 for hypopigmentation [ Time Frame: Baseline and 12 weeks ] Skin Evaluation

2016 Clinical Trials

8. Skin, Grafts

be set at an adjustable depth and width for appropriate coverage of the defect. Donor site selection. Lidocaine with epinephrine may be injected subcutaneously at the donor site prior to harvesting, which aids in reducing blood loss and providing greater tissue turgor to facilitate graft harvest. The planned harvest site and dermatome can be lubricated with mineral oil, sterile saline, or Shur-Clens (ConvaTec, Princeton, NJ) to enable easy gliding of the dermatome over the skin. Epinephrine-soaked (...) Skin, Grafts Skin Grafts and Biologic Skin Substitutes: Overview, Relevant Anatomy, Graft Survival and Healing Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTI5NTEwOS1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Skin Grafts

2014 eMedicine Surgery

9. Skin Grafts, Split-Thickness

Skin Grafts, Split-Thickness Split-Thickness Skin Grafts: Overview, Graft Selection, Donor Site Selection Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvODc2MjkwLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Split-Thickness Skin (...) Grafts Updated: Apr 04, 2019 Author: Mark K Wax, MD; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Split-Thickness Skin Grafts Overview Overview Skin covers the entire external surface of the human body, representing the largest single organ. The integument acts as a protective barrier from environmental insults including trauma, radiation, harsh environmental conditions and infection. Other functions include thermoregulation (through sweating

2014 eMedicine Surgery

10. Hyponatraemia

of hyponatraemia.) This topic principally focuses on hypotonic (hypo-osmolar) hyponatraemia, the most common type of hyponatraemia. History and exam presence of risk factors high fluid intake fluid losses history of diabetes mellitus history of cirrhosis, nephrosis, congestive heart failure nausea/vomiting mild cognitive symptoms altered mental status, seizures, coma low urine output weight changes orthostatic hypotension abnormal jugular venous pressure poor skin turgor dry mucous membranes absence

2019 BMJ Best Practice

11. Acute pancreatitis

of hypovolaemia (including decreased skin turgor, dry mucous membranes, hypotension, and sweating) are common. In more severe cases, the patient may be tachycardic and/or tachypnoeic. Elevated serum lipase or amylase concentration supports, but is not pathognomonic for, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Initial treatment includes resuscitation with intravenous fluids and correction of electrolyte abnormalities, analgesia, and tight glucose control. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis includes support

2019 BMJ Best Practice

12. VIPoma

, such as the retroperitoneum or thorax. Soga J, Yakuwa Y. Vipoma/diarrheogenic syndrome: a statistical evaluation of 241 reported cases. J Exp Clin Cancer Res. 1998;17:389-400. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10089056?tool=bestpractice.com It secretes an active hormone called vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which results in a clinical syndrome characterised by watery diarrhoea, hypokalaemia, acidosis, hypochlorhydria, and hypercalcaemia. History and exam watery diarrhoea middle age headache weight loss poor skin (...) turgor flushing history of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) middle age Diagnostic investigations serum potassium serum bicarbonate serum calcium serum glucose vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) radioimmunoassay liver function tests arterial blood gas analysis gastric pH monitoring chromogranin A pancreatic polypeptide ultrasound contrast-enhanced thin-slice computed tomography scan of abdomen contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

2018 BMJ Best Practice

13. Hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state

, weakness, weight loss, tachycardia, dry mucous membranes, poor skin turgor, hypotension, and, in severe cases, shock. Altered sensorium (lethargy, disorientation, stupor) is common and correlates best with effective serum osmolality. Coma is rare and, if seen, is usually associated with a serum osmolality >340 mmol/kg (>340 mOsm/kg) Treatment includes correction of fluid deficit and electrolyte abnormalities, and intravenous insulin. Definition Hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS), also known as non (...) ?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam altered mental status polyuria polydipsia weight loss weakness dry mucous membranes poor skin turgor tachycardia hypotension seizures hypothermia shock abdominal pain focal neurological signs infection inadequate insulin or oral antidiabetic therapy acute illness in a known patient with diabetes nursing home residents postoperative state precipitating medications total parenteral nutrition (TPN) Cushing's syndrome hyperthyroidism acromegaly Diagnostic

2018 BMJ Best Practice

14. Acute pancreatitis

of hypovolaemia (including decreased skin turgor, dry mucous membranes, hypotension, and sweating) are common. In more severe cases, the patient may be tachycardic and/or tachypnoeic. Elevated serum lipase or amylase concentration supports, but is not pathognomonic for, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Initial treatment includes resuscitation with intravenous fluids and correction of electrolyte abnormalities, analgesia, and tight glucose control. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis includes support

2018 BMJ Best Practice

15. Diabetic ketoacidosis

, dry mucous membranes, poor skin turgor, hypotension, and, in severe cases, shock. Successful treatment includes correction of volume depletion, hyperglycaemia, electrolyte imbalances, and comorbid precipitating events, with frequent monitoring. Complications of treatment include hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia, hypoxaemia, and rarely pulmonary oedema. Cerebral oedema, a rare but potentially rapidly fatal complication, occurs mainly in children. It may be prevented by avoiding overly rapid fluid (...) skin turgor sunken eyes tachycardia hypotension Kussmaul respiration acetone breath altered mental status hypothermia inadequate or inappropriate insulin therapy infection MI pancreatitis stroke acromegaly hyperthyroidism drugs such as corticosteroids, thiazides, pentamidine, sympathomimetics, second-generation antipsychotics, cocaine, immune checkpoint inhibitors, or SGLT2 inhibitors Cushing's syndrome Hispanic or black ancestry bariatric surgery Diagnostic investigations plasma glucose ABG

2018 BMJ Best Practice

16. Hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state

, weakness, weight loss, tachycardia, dry mucous membranes, poor skin turgor, hypotension, and, in severe cases, shock. Altered sensorium (lethargy, disorientation, stupor) is common and correlates best with effective serum osmolality. Coma is rare and, if seen, is usually associated with a serum osmolality >340 mmol/kg (>340 mOsm/kg) Treatment includes correction of fluid deficit and electrolyte abnormalities, and intravenous insulin. Definition Hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS), also known as non (...) ?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam altered mental status polyuria polydipsia weight loss weakness dry mucous membranes poor skin turgor tachycardia hypotension seizures hypothermia shock abdominal pain focal neurological signs infection inadequate insulin or oral antidiabetic therapy acute illness in a known patient with diabetes nursing home residents postoperative state precipitating medications total parenteral nutrition (TPN) Cushing's syndrome hyperthyroidism acromegaly Diagnostic

2018 BMJ Best Practice

17. VIPoma

, such as the retroperitoneum or thorax. Soga J, Yakuwa Y. Vipoma/diarrheogenic syndrome: a statistical evaluation of 241 reported cases. J Exp Clin Cancer Res. 1998;17:389-400. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10089056?tool=bestpractice.com It secretes an active hormone called vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which results in a clinical syndrome characterised by watery diarrhoea, hypokalaemia, acidosis, hypochlorhydria, and hypercalcaemia. History and exam watery diarrhoea middle age headache weight loss poor skin (...) turgor flushing history of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) middle age Diagnostic investigations serum potassium serum bicarbonate serum calcium serum glucose vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) radioimmunoassay liver function tests arterial blood gas analysis gastric pH monitoring chromogranin A pancreatic polypeptide ultrasound contrast-enhanced thin-slice computed tomography scan of abdomen contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

2018 BMJ Best Practice

18. Volume depletion in adults

intestinal obstruction severe pancreatitis crush injuries intra-abdominal bleeding fatigue thirst dry mucous membranes muscle cramps abdominal pain chest pain confusion decreased skin turgor diuretic therapy chronic kidney disease older adult altered mental status high ambient temperature Diagnostic investigations FBC serum electrolytes blood glucose serum urea serum creatinine urinalysis random urine sodium fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) random urine chloride random urine creatinine random urine (...) renal losses (diuresis) or extrarenal losses (from the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory system, skin, fever, sepsis, or third-space sequestration). Di Somma S, Gori, CS, Grandi T, et al. Fluid assessment and management at the emergency department. Fluid overload diagnosis and management. Contrib Nephrol. 2010;164:227-236. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20428007?tool=bestpractice.com Without proper assessment and timely resuscitation, volume depletion can lead to circulatory collapse and shock

2018 BMJ Best Practice

19. Hyponatraemia

of hyponatraemia.) This topic principally focuses on hypotonic (hypo-osmolar) hyponatraemia, the most common type of hyponatraemia. History and exam presence of risk factors high fluid intake fluid losses history of diabetes mellitus history of cirrhosis, nephrosis, congestive heart failure nausea/vomiting mild cognitive symptoms altered mental status, seizures, coma low urine output weight changes orthostatic hypotension abnormal jugular venous pressure poor skin turgor dry mucous membranes absence

2018 BMJ Best Practice

20. Volume depletion in children

generalised irritability, decreased activity, tachycardia, delayed capillary refill, dry mucous membranes, sunken eyes, decreased skin turgor, and decreased urination. Hypotension is a late sign of volume depletion in children and often heralds overt circulatory collapse. Initial management of children with mild or moderate volume depletion is with oral rehydration therapy. Regardless of aetiology, children with severe hypovolaemia and shock should be treated promptly with intravenous isotonic crystalloid (...) depletion. Volume depletion can also be secondary to haemorrhage, excessive renal fluid and solute losses, increased insensible losses, and redistribution of body fluid into extravascular tissue (third spacing). Symptoms of volume depletion can range from thirst (with mild depletion) to irreversible shock and death in severe cases. History and exam presence of risk factors thirst capillary refill >3 seconds decreased skin turgor dry mucous membranes abnormal mental status or activity level tachycardia

2018 BMJ Best Practice

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