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Skin Conditions of Pregnancy

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1. Skin Conditions of Pregnancy

Skin Conditions of Pregnancy Skin Conditions of Pregnancy Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Skin Conditions of Pregnancy (...) Skin Conditions of Pregnancy Aka: Skin Conditions of Pregnancy , Pregnancy Related Rash , Dermatitis in Pregnancy , Dermatoses of Pregnancy II. Causes: Pregnancy Specific See (e.g. ) Pruritic of pregnancy III. Causes: Pregnancy-Related Pruritic Conditions See Common Prurigo of Pregnancy Uncommon or Pruritic of Pregnancy IV. Causes: Exacerbated by Pregnancy Nail changes (e.g. , brittle nails, grooves) Telangiectasias s (regress after pregnancy) V. References Images: Related links to external sites

2018 FP Notebook

2. Updated SOGC Committee Opinion – COVID-19 in Pregnancy

on how to prevent or manage infection with COVID-19. Due to physiologic changes that occur in pregnancy, when compared with their non-pregnant counterparts, pregnant women with lower respiratory tract infections often experience worse outcomes, including higher rates of hospital and intensive care unit admission. (3) Since 2002 there have been two other global outbreaks of highly-pathogenic coronaviruses: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and middle east respiratory syndrome (MERS). While SARS (...) with SARS and MERS infection. The only published case-control study showed that pregnant women with SARS experienced worse outcomes than non-pregnant women of similar age.(10) Reports varied with respect to the effects of SARS and MERS on pregnancy outcomes. Spontaneous abortion has been reported among women infected with SARS and MERS in the first trimester.4 As well, stillbirth, intrauterine growth restriction, and preterm birth have been reported in pregnancies affected by SARS and MERS in the second

2020 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

3. Vitamin D Postpartum Concentrations: Relationship with Nutritional Condition and Morbidities during Pregnancy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vitamin D Postpartum Concentrations: Relationship with Nutritional Condition and Morbidities during Pregnancy To evaluate postpartum vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency and to relate it to pregestational BMI, gestational weight gain, and sociodemographic variables.This is a cross-sectional study with 225 full-term pregnant women. Data collected are as follows: maternal health, socioeconomic status, pregestational body mass index (BMI), and gestational weight gain. Laboratory evaluation included (...) vitamin D [25(OH)D], calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and alkaline phosphatase.The mean age of women was 25.6±6.6 years. Dark skin color, low education, and work in the urban region were predominant. Regular sun exposure, photoprotection, and vitamin D supplementation were reported by 144 (64.0%), 44 (19.6%), and 5 (2.2%) women, respectively. The mean plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D were 26.0±6.8 ng/mL. Levels compatible with deficiency (<20 ng/mL) and insufficiency (20-30 ng/mL) were observed in 43

2018 Journal of pregnancy

4. Towards integrated antenatal care for low-risk pregnancy

the baseline ANC services that all pregnant women have to benefit from. The baseline care are sufficient for low risk pregnancies and have to be completed with additional interventions for pregnant women who present one or more medical and/or psychosocial risk factors. These additional interventions have to be tailored in function of the particular needs engendered by their medical condition(s), personal characteristics (e.g. teenage mothers) or living conditions (e.g. victims of violence, drug users (...) engaged in non-clinical interventions 28 3.2.4 How to improve BPPE: Literature review and stakeholders consultation 28 3.3 ICT INNOVATIONS FOR INFORMATION EXCHANGE 31 4 LEGAL FRAMEWORK OF ANC AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES FOR PREGNANT WOMEN IN BELGIUM 33 4.1 LEGAL FRAMEWORK OF ANC IN BELGIUM 33 4.2 PROTECTIVE MEASURES FOR (VULNERABLE) PREGNANT WOMEN 34 2 Towards integrated antenatal care for low-risk pregnancy KCE Report 326 5 PROVISION AND UPTAKE OF ROUTINE ANC: PARENTS’ AND HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

2020 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

5. Pregnancy and Renal Disease

to the survey, including 76 (49%) nephrologists, 36 (23%) obstetricians, 16 (10%) pharmacists, 12 (8%) midwives, 7 (4%) obstetric physicians, 5 (3%) physicians, 2 (1%) patients, 1 dietician and 1 person with role in guideline development. Of those completing the survey, 57 (37%) were part of a specialist multidisciplinary team managing women with CKD in pregnancy and 72 (46%) were routinely involved in either the renal or obstetric care of pregnant women with CKD. The strength of the recommendation (...) was assigned as ‘strong’ (‘we recommend...’) or conditional (‘we suggest...’) based on a threshold of 75% of respondents agreeing with the recommendation, and where benefits outweigh risks for most, if not all patients. Renal Association Clinical Practice Guideline Pregnancy and Renal Disease – September 2019 3 Table of Contents 1. Introduction 4 2 Summary of clinicial practice guidelines 7 3. Summary of audit measures 17 4. Summary of research recommendations 18 5. Rationale for clinical practice

2019 Renal Association

6. Covid-19: Recommendations for GDM screening and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy and postpartum

Covid-19: Recommendations for GDM screening and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy and postpartum Translating evidence into best clinical practice Queensland Health NOTICE OF UPDATE DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC DATE 14 April 2020 TOPIC Recommendations for GDM screening and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy and postpartum APPLIES TO All pregnant and postnatal women irrespective of COVID-19 status RATIONALE During the COVID-19 pandemic • Supports social distancing (...) macrosomia (birth weight > 4500 g or > 90th percentile • Previous perinatal loss • Polycystic ovarian syndrome • Medications (corticosteroids, antipsychotics) • Multiple pregnancy COVID-19 pandemic • Applies to: Pregnant women regardless of COVID-19 status • Rationale: To support social distancing and minimise blood collection time (i.e not based on new evidence) • Implementation: Commence as practical and convenient. Seek expert advice as clinically appropriate Check fasting FBG • At 24–28 weeks

2020 Queensland Health

7. Dermatologic conditions in patients of color who are pregnant Full Text available with Trip Pro

Dermatologic conditions in patients of color who are pregnant Certain dermatoses that present during pregnancy have a predilection for populations with skin of color (SOC). Additionally, certain systemic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus tend to be more aggressive during pregnancy and confer worse prognoses in women with SOC. The purpose of this review is to highlight the unique implications of selected diseases during pregnancy as it relates to SOC. Dermatologists should (...) be vigilant for the unique clinical variations of dermatological conditions in patients of color who are pregnant to ensure correct diagnoses and optimize treatment outcomes.

2017 International journal of women's dermatology

8. Overview of pregnancy complications

Overview of pregnancy complications Overview of pregnancy complications - Summary of relevant conditions | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Overview of pregnancy complications Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Introduction Complications in pregnancy can result from conditions that are specifically linked to the pregnant state as well as conditions that commonly arise or occur incidentally in women who are pregnant (...) cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pruritic condition caused by impaired bile flow allowing bile salts to be deposited in the skin and the placenta. Usually presents in the third trimester with pruritus, which is worse at night, starts on the soles of feet and hands, and spares the face. Some women may present with jaundice and significant liver dysfunction, coagulopathy from vitamin K deficiency (rarely), abnormal fetal heart rate, premature labour, or intrauterine fetal demise. Risk factors include

2018 BMJ Best Practice

9. Overview of pregnancy complications

Overview of pregnancy complications Overview of pregnancy complications - Summary of relevant conditions | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Overview of pregnancy complications Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Introduction Complications in pregnancy can result from conditions that are specifically linked to the pregnant state as well as conditions that commonly arise or occur incidentally in women who are pregnant (...) cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pruritic condition caused by impaired bile flow allowing bile salts to be deposited in the skin and the placenta. Usually presents in the third trimester with pruritus, which is worse at night, starts on the soles of feet and hands, and spares the face. Some women may present with jaundice and significant liver dysfunction, coagulopathy from vitamin K deficiency (rarely), abnormal fetal heart rate, premature labour, or intrauterine fetal demise. Risk factors include

2018 BMJ Best Practice

10. Treating Opioid Use Disorder During Pregnancy: Guideline Supplement

represent the view of the Pregnancy Supplement Committee, arrived at after careful consideration of the available scientific evidence and external expert peer review. When treating pregnant patients with opioid use disorder, health care professionals are expected to consider this guideline supplement alongside the recommendations articulated in A Guideline for the Clinical Management of Opioid Use Disorder. These guidelines should be considered and interpreted in the context of the individual needs (...) to pregnant individuals*. This guideline recognizes persisting misconceptions about pregnant people who use substances as a primary barrier to accessing treatment for opioid use disorder during pregnancy, and emphasises the need for a non-judgmental, trauma-informed and culturally safe approach to care that accommodates patients’ individual choices and circumstances. Within this framework, the present document recommends a holistic and integrated care plan with appropriate use of the full range

2018 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

11. Updated measures for pregnancy prevention during retinoid use

retinoids are also used to treat certain forms of cancer. The review confirmed that oral retinoids can harm the unborn child and must not be used during pregnancy. In addition, the oral retinoids acitretin, alitretinoin and isotretinoin, which are used to treat conditions mainly affecting the skin, must be used in accordance with the conditions of a new pregnancy prevention programme by women able to have children. Topical retinoids (those applied to the skin) must also not be used during pregnancy (...) final opinion. The opinion will be sent to the European Commission, which will take a final legally binding decision valid across the EU. Information for patients Retinoid medicines, used mainly to treat conditions affecting the skin such as severe acne, are harmful to the unborn baby if taken during pregnancy. Oral (taken by mouth) retinoids must not be used during pregnancy. In addition, the oral retinoids acitretin, alitretinoin and isotretinoin must not be taken by women able to have children

2018 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

12. Care of Women with Obesity in Pregnancy

What care should be provided in the primary care setting to women of childbearing age with obesity who wish to become pregnant? Primary care services should ensure that all women of childbearing age have the opportunity to optimise their weight before pregnancy. Advice on weight and lifestyle should be given during preconception counselling or contraceptive consultations. Weight and BMI should be measured to encourage women to optimise their weight before pregnancy. P Women of childbearing age (...) after caesarean (VBAC) section. B What nutritional supplements should be recommended to women with obesity who wish to become pregnant? Women with a BMI 30 kg/m 2 or greater wishing to become pregnant should be advised to take 5 mg folic acid supplementation daily, starting at least 1 month before conception and continuing during the ?rst trimester of pregnancy. D Obese women are at high risk of vitamin D de?ciency. However, although vitamin D supplementation may ensure that women are vitamin D

2018 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

13. Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery

The objective of this guideline is to evaluate bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy concerning • Different treatments for prevention of preterm delivery. • Screening of pregnant women with low as well as high risk of sPTD. • Stratification into gestational ages below and above 16 weeks. • Diagnostic methods. Key words Bacterial vaginosis, vaginal pH, pH-glove, vaginal discharge, Nugent score, Amsel score, Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus species, preterm delivery, preterm birth, GRADE, clindamycin (...) , clindamycin might be used for treatment of symp- toms). • This recommendation addresses both treatment with metronidazole and clindamycin. • This recommendation addresses all gestational ages of pregnancy. Treatment with probiotics ??: We suggest against treatment of BV-positive pregnant women with probiotics in order reducing the risk of sPTD. • This recommendation addresses both women at low and high risk of sPTD. • This recommendation addresses asymptomatic as well as symptomatic women

2019 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology

14. Oral retinoid medicines: revised and simplified pregnancy prevention educational materials for healthcare professionals and women

to support the Pregnancy Prevention Programme for the oral retinoid medicines acitretin, alitretinoin, and isotretinoin have been revised and simplified due to a high risk of serious congenital malformations, these medicines must not be used in pregnancy, and any use in women and girls must be within the conditions of a Pregnancy Prevention Programme, which are consistent with those previously in place (see below) Advice for healthcare professionals about neuropsychiatric reactions: advice about (...) favourable. The review recommended that educational materials for patients and healthcare professionals about pregnancy prevention measures should be simplified and made consistent and warnings about neuropsychiatric disorders harmonised across oral retinoid medicines (see ). Review of the effectiveness of pregnancy prevention measures Revised and simplified educational materials Women and girls of childbearing potential taking oral retinoids to treat dermatological conditions must be supported

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

15. UK guidelines on the management of iron deficiency in pregnancy Full Text available with Trip Pro

. I have read and accept the Wiley Online Library Terms and Conditions of Use. Shareable Link Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Copy URL Share a link Share on ). The prevalence of anaemia in pregnancy remains high. In order to minimise adverse outcomes, including use of blood transfusion, further research is required to define optimal management, as many current recommendations are not supported by high quality evidence. Methods (...) is required for fetal growth and development (Scholl, ), as well as for increased maternal erythropoiesis (Bothwell, ; Fisher & Nemeth, ). The current Hb thresholds defining anaemia in pregnancy are based on historical normal values derived from non‐pregnant populations, which are not clearly linked to clinical outcomes and there is ongoing debate as to the applicability of these values (Pasricha et al , ). The WHO is reviewing the evidence relating to the Hb below which anaemia should be defined (WHO

2019 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

16. Syphilis in pregnancy

reduction · Early screening of all pregnant women, and identification of high risk pregnancies and babies can prevent adverse perinatal outcomes 15,16 Queensland Clinical Guideline: Syphilis in pregnancy Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 9 of 31 1.4 Notifiable disease Table 3. Disease notification Aspect Consideration Context · Syphilis is a controlled notifiable disease in Queensland as per the Public Health Act (2005) 19 · Routine reporting is the cornerstone of syphilis (...) conditional decisions to testing · When there is optional (rather than recommended) testing at birth, there is a greater chance that women who are ‘at risk’ are not identified as such and are not appropriately tested Referral pathways · Establish local referral pathways, that are culturally appropriate, to support access to care for women with syphilis in pregnancy · At the time of presentation, individualise the most appropriate pathway to the woman’s circumstances (e.g. from emergency department

2019 Queensland Health

17. Immune Modulating Therapies in Pregnancy and Lactation

by those organizations. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this published product. Immune Modulating Therapies in Pregnancy and Lactation ABSTRACT: Because autoimmune conditions occur more often among women of childbearing age, continuation of these medications during pregnancy is often considered to optimize disease management in the woman and pregnancy outcomes, without placing (...) a variety of immunomodulating drugs, defined in this document as agents that inhibit or modulate the immune response. Because autoimmune conditions occur more often among women of childbearing age ( ), continuation of these medications during pregnancy is often considered to optimize disease management in the woman and pregnancy outcomes ( ), without placing the fetus at undue risk ( ). Emerging safety and efficacy data regarding the use of these medications during pregnancy and lactation can be used

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

18. Intrapartum care for women with existing medical conditions or obstetric complications and their babies

-for-gestational-age baby 46 1.17 Large-for-gestational-age baby 46 1.18 No antenatal care 47 1.19 Previous caesarean section 50 1.20 Labour after 42 weeks of pregnancy 52 T erms used in this guideline 52 Recommendations for research 54 1 Subarachnoid haemorrhage or arteriovenous malformation of the brain 54 2 Needle siting in pregnant women who are obese 54 Intrapartum care for women with existing medical conditions or obstetric complications and their babies (NG121) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject (...) during pregnancy. NICE has published a guideline on diabetes in pregnancy. T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on information for women with existing medical conditions and how they might affect practice, see rationale and impact. 1.2 Planning for intrapartum care with women with existing medical conditions – involving a multidisciplinary team 1.2.1 A multidisciplinary team led by a named healthcare professional should involve a pregnant woman with a medical condition in preparing

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

19. Cholestasis of pregnancy

disease with bile acid levels >40 micromol/L or severe pruritus remote from term can be treated effectively with ursodeoxycholic acid. Close fetal surveillance with delivery near term can be expected with premature delivery reserved for those with severe, worsening disease despite treatment. Definition Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pruritic condition during pregnancy caused by impaired bile flow allowing bile salts to be deposited in the skin and the placenta. The cause (...) Cholestasis of pregnancy Cholestasis of pregnancy - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Cholestasis of pregnancy Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: October 2017 Summary May be associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including premature birth, intra-uterine fetal demise, and placental abruption in severe disease. There is an increased risk of respiratory distress syndrome

2017 BMJ Best Practice

20. Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly)

Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly) CEff 150617 1 FINAL Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2 nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly) June 2017 Series authors: Dr Michael Osborn, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust Professor Jim Lowe, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust Specialist authors: Dr Phillip Cox, Birmingham Women s Hospital NHS Foundation (...) Trust Dr Beata Hargitai, Birmingham Women s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Dr Tamas Marton, Birmingham Women s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Unique document number G161 Document name Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2 nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly) Version number 1 Produced by The specialist content of this guideline has been produced by Dr Phillip Cox MBBS, FRCPath, PhD, Consultant Perinatal Pathologist; Dr Beata Hargitai, MD, Affiliate

2017 Royal College of Pathologists

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