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Septic Arthritis Causes

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1. Septic arthritis

cases of suspected joint sepsis, empirical antibiotic therapy should be commenced once appropriate cultures have been taken. Definition Septic arthritis is defined as the infection of 1 or more joints caused by pathogenic inoculation of microbes. It occurs either by direct inoculation or via haematogenous spread. History and exam hot, swollen, tender, restricted joint low socioeconomic status history of intravenous drug abuse history of diabetes history of cutaneous ulcers prosthetic joint history (...) Septic arthritis Septic arthritis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Septic arthritis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary A septic joint will be painful, hot, swollen, and restricted. Diagnosis is based on the opinion of the clinician experienced in the management of musculoskeletal disease. In all cases of suspected native joint sepsis, the joint should be aspirated. In all

2019 BMJ Best Practice

2. Septic arthritis

cases of suspected joint sepsis, empirical antibiotic therapy should be commenced once appropriate cultures have been taken. Definition Septic arthritis is defined as the infection of 1 or more joints caused by pathogenic inoculation of microbes. It occurs either by direct inoculation or via haematogenous spread. History and exam hot, swollen, tender, restricted joint low socioeconomic status history of intravenous drug abuse history of diabetes history of cutaneous ulcers prosthetic joint history (...) Septic arthritis Septic arthritis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Septic arthritis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary A septic joint will be painful, hot, swollen, and restricted. Diagnosis is based on the opinion of the clinician experienced in the management of musculoskeletal disease. In all cases of suspected native joint sepsis, the joint should be aspirated. In all

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Disseminated Exophiala dermatitidis causing septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. (PubMed)

Disseminated Exophiala dermatitidis causing septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Exophiala dermatitidis is a melanized fungus isolated from many environmental sources. Infections caused by Exophiala species are typically seen in immunocompromised hosts and manifest most commonly as cutaneous or subcutaneous disease. Systemic infections are exceedingly rare and associated with significant morbidity and mortality CASE PRESENTATION: A 28-year-old female originally from India presented with fevers (...) . Voriconazole was initially utilized, but due to relapse of infection involving the right iliac crest and left proximal humerus, she received a prolonged course of amphotericin B and posaconazole in combination and required 7 separate surgical interventions. Prolonged disease stability following discontinuation of therapy was achieved.Described is the first identified case of disseminated Exophiala dermatitidis causing osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in a patient on immunosuppressive therapy. A positive

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2018 BMC Infectious Diseases

4. Kingella kingae as the Main Cause of Septic Arthritis: Importance of Molecular Diagnosis. (PubMed)

Kingella kingae as the Main Cause of Septic Arthritis: Importance of Molecular Diagnosis. Kingella kingae is an emergent pathogen causing septic arthritis (SA) in children.The objective of this study was to analyze the etiology of SA in children before and after the implementation of universal 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction and sequencing (16SPCR) in synovial fluid.Children ≤14 years with acute SA from a Madrid cohort (2002-2013) were reviewed. Differences in etiology were analyzed (...) before (period 1) and after (period 2) the implementation of bacterial 16SPCR in 2009. A comparison in epidemiology, clinical syndromes, therapy and outcome between infections caused by K. kingae and other bacteria was performed.Bacteria were detected from 40/81 (49.4%) children, with a higher proportion of diagnosis after 16SPCR establishment (period 2, 63% vs. period 1, 31.4%; P = 0.005). The main etiologies were Staphylococcus aureus (37.5%) and K. kingae (35%), although K. kingae was the most

2018 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

5. Septic arthritis of the cervical facets: Unusual cause of neck pain (PubMed)

Septic arthritis of the cervical facets: Unusual cause of neck pain Sagittal T2-weighted fat saturation magnetic resonance imaging reveals erosion and a high-intensity area around the C3-C4 facet joint.

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2018 Journal of General and Family Medicine

6. Clinical Question: Are ESR and CRP useful tests when evaluating an adult patient with potential septic arthritis?

arthritis, or crystal arthropathies. 1–3 Of these, the can’t miss diagnosis is septic arthritis, as delayed treatment can cause irreversible joint destruction with a fatality rate up to 11% if not treated. 4 Yikes. The Patient You are working in minor treatment and a 70-year-old gentleman presents with pain in his left knee that has been worsening over the past week. It is painful to ambulate, and the knee has been quite swollen and red the last couple of days. There is no history of trauma. What do you (...) Clinical Question: Are ESR and CRP useful tests when evaluating an adult patient with potential septic arthritis? Clinical Question: Are ESR and CRP useful tests when evaluating an adult patient with potential septic arthritis? - CanadiEM Clinical Question: Are ESR and CRP useful tests when evaluating an adult patient with potential septic arthritis? In , by Aaron Sobkowicz May 23, 2017 Monoarthropathies are common and carry a broad differential including infection, trauma, lupus, rheumatoid

2017 CandiEM

7. A comparison of Streptococcus agalactiae septic arthritis and non-Streptococcus agalactiae septic arthritis (PubMed)

A comparison of Streptococcus agalactiae septic arthritis and non-Streptococcus agalactiae septic arthritis Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an uncommon cause of septic arthritis in the adult population. In recent years, there has been an increase in the incidence of GBS septic arthritis. This study aims to compare the clinical presentation, investigations, microbiology and outcome of management in patients with GBS and non-GBS septic arthritis.Retrospective review (...) of hospital surgical records was done to identify all patients treated surgically at our institution from January 2011 to January 2016 for primary septic arthritis. Patients were categorised into two groups: those with culture-proven GBS septic arthritis and those with causative pathogens that were not GBS. Patients who were medically unfit for surgical intervention as well as those who declined interventional procedures were excluded from the study.A total of 83 patients were included in the study: 62

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2018 Singapore medical journal

8. Clinical Epidemiology of Septic Arthritis Caused by <i>Burkholderia pseudomallei</i> and Other Bacterial Pathogens in Northeast Thailand. (PubMed)

Clinical Epidemiology of Septic Arthritis Caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Other Bacterial Pathogens in Northeast Thailand. Septic arthritis is a medical emergency, and if not treated appropriately, it can be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Melioidosis, a serious infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei, is highly endemic in South and Southeast Asia and northern Australia. We reviewed the medical charts of adult patients (...) admitted with bacterial septic arthritis at Sunpasitthiprasong Hospital, Ubon Ratchathani, northeast Thailand from January 2012 to December 2014. Bacterial septic arthritis was defined as one or more hot swollen joints with isolation of a pathogenic organism from an affected joint or from blood. A total of 154 patients with septic arthritis were retrospectively evaluated. The most common causes were B. pseudomallei (48%, N = 74), Streptococcus spp. (29%, N = 44), and Staphylococcus aureus (10%, N = 16

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2017 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

9. Acute Septic Arthritis of the Knee Caused by Kingella kingae in a 5-Year-Old Cameroonian Boy (PubMed)

Acute Septic Arthritis of the Knee Caused by Kingella kingae in a 5-Year-Old Cameroonian Boy Kingella kingae is an important cause of invasive infections in young children from Western countries. Although increasing reports indicate that this organism is the leading agent of bone and joint infections in early childhood, data on K. kingae infections from resource-limited settings are scarce, and none has yet been reported in Africa. We herein report the diagnostic and epidemiological (...) report demonstrates that K. kingae may be considered as a potential cause of septic arthritis in children living in sub-Saharan Africa, and hence the burden of K. kingae infection may be not limited to the Western countries. Further studies are required to determine the prevalence of K. kingae infection and carriage in Africa.

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2017 Frontiers in pediatrics

10. Septic arthritis caused by an emerging ST121 methicillin-susceptible, PVL-negative Staphylococcus aureus harbouring a variant of bone sialoprotein-binding protein gene (PubMed)

Septic arthritis caused by an emerging ST121 methicillin-susceptible, PVL-negative Staphylococcus aureus harbouring a variant of bone sialoprotein-binding protein gene ST121/agr-IV methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from a patient of septic arthritis (synovial fluid, blood, skin and nasal cavity). Although the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene was negative, this isolate harboured a gene encoding a variant of bone sialoprotein-binding protein with a shortened SD

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2017 New Microbes and New Infections

11. Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Child (PubMed)

Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Child Septic arthritis can be a devastating condition that leads to further morbidity and potential mortality if not identified early in its course. Emergency providers must keep septic arthritis high on their differential of any joint-related pain in the pediatric population. We present a case of an eight-year-old female who initially presented with the chief complaint of chest pain and was subsequently diagnosed (...) with septic arthritis of the left sternoclavicular joint in the emergency department.

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2017 Clinical Practice and Cases in Emergency Medicine

12. Suspected Osteomyelitis, Septic Arthritis, or Soft Tissue Infection (Excluding Spine and Diabetic Foot)

Suspected Osteomyelitis, Septic Arthritis, or Soft Tissue Infection (Excluding Spine and Diabetic Foot) Date of origin: 2016 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Suspected Osteomyelitis/Septic Arthritis American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Clinical Condition: Suspected Osteomyelitis, Septic Arthritis, or Soft Tissue Infection (Excluding Spine and Diabetic Foot) Variant 1: Suspected osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, or soft-tissue infection (excluding spine and diabetic foot (...) Criteria ® 2 Suspected Osteomyelitis/Septic Arthritis Clinical Condition: Suspected Osteomyelitis, Septic Arthritis, or Soft Tissue Infection (Excluding Spine and Diabetic Foot) Variant 3: Soft-tissue or juxta-articular swelling with a history of puncture wound. Suspected foreign body. Negative radiographs. Radiologic Procedure Rating Comments RRL* US area of interest 8 This procedure is an alternative to CT and MRI. It is favored for radiolucent (wood, plastic) foreign body. O CT area of interest

2016 American College of Radiology

13. Distinguishing Pediatric Lyme Arthritis of the Hip from Transient Synovitis and Acute Bacterial Septic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (PubMed)

(P < 0.001) and refusal to bear weight (P < 0.01) between SA, LA, and TS. Conclusions Monoarticular Lyme arthritis can be a cause of hip pain in certain geographic areas and has clinical and diagnostic overlap with transient synovitis and acute bacterial septic arthritis. This study consolidates the available literature and represents the largest series of patients diagnosed with Lyme arthritis of the hip to date. We propose a diagnostic algorithm that serially incorporates ESR, followed (...) Distinguishing Pediatric Lyme Arthritis of the Hip from Transient Synovitis and Acute Bacterial Septic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Objective Lyme arthritis is an increasingly recognized clinical entity that often prompts orthopaedic evaluation in pediatric patients. While Lyme arthritis is most common in the knee, the clinical presentation of Lyme arthritis of the hip can be similar to both acute bacterial septic arthritis and transient synovitis. Accurately distinguishing

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2018 Cureus

14. Haemophilus influenzae type a as a cause of paediatric septic arthritis (PubMed)

Haemophilus influenzae type a as a cause of paediatric septic arthritis Incidence rates of invasive Haemophilus influenzae serotype b disease have decreased significantly since the introduction of the Hib vaccine; however, the rates in indigenous populations remain disproportionately high, specifically in the paediatric population. Additionally, with the decline of type b invasive infections, there has been a rebound in the incidence of invasive infections caused by other strains of H (...) . influenzae, particularly serotype a.We present a paediatric case of septic arthritis caused by H. influenzae type a in a toddler that was fully resolved following antibiotic therapy. This report adds to other reports of septic arthritis in indigenous populations as shown through a review of recently documented H. influenzae type a septic arthritis cases.Socio-economic risk factors for invasive H. influenzae type a disease, such as poverty, poor housing conditions, overcrowding, smoking and substance

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2016 JMM Case Reports

15. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint caused by rare bacteria Raoultella ornithinolytica. (PubMed)

Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint caused by rare bacteria Raoultella ornithinolytica. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an unusual disease in adults. Inoculation of the pathogen may occur through traumatic or iatrogenic injuries, or more often by haematogenous spread from a distant focus. The cause of infection is unknown in most cases. A case of ostensibly mild septic arthritis of the TMJ with a good response to antibiotic therapy and lavage (...) , but that finally led to fatal destruction of the joint structures in a 38-year-old female patient, is reported herein. The infection was caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica - a rare bacterial species in humans, which has not been reported previously in any patients with joint problems. The arthritis manifested 5 weeks after an arthroscopy procedure, so the cause was not clear.Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

2016 International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

16. Septic Arthritis Causes

Septic Arthritis Causes Septic Arthritis Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Septic Arthritis Causes Septic (...) Arthritis Causes Aka: Septic Arthritis Causes , Septic Joint Causes II. Causes: General Most common cause of in all ages III. Causes: Septic Arthritis Causes based on age Infant (age <3 months, contiguous spread from ) (common) (common) Children (age 3 months to 14 years) No cause identified in one third of cases (27%) (14%) e (<3% of cases, much less common in U.S. since start of ) Kingella kingae (preschool children Adults with STD risk (most common) See Gonorrrhea is a still a leading cause in young

2018 FP Notebook

17. Septic arthritis of the wrist caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare: a case report (PubMed)

Septic arthritis of the wrist caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare: a case report Septic arthritis of the wrist is rare entity, especially; atypical mycobacterial infection of the wrist is extremely rare. We report a case of septic arthritis of the wrist caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare, which was successfully treated by radical debridement followed by wrist arthrodesis using vascularised fibular grafting.

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2016 Case Reports in Plastic Surgery & Hand Surgery

18. A Neonatal Septic Arthritis Case Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae: A Case Report (PubMed)

A Neonatal Septic Arthritis Case Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae: A Case Report Septic arthritis is encountered very rarely during the neonatal period and its diagnosis can delay because of atypical symptoms, thus it may lead to serious sequelae. The sequale can be prevented by early diagnosis and concomitant treatment. In neonates, pain can be experienced as a result of pseudoparalysis and of movement of the effected joints. A 17-day-old neonatal patient was brought to our hospital (...) with complaint of unrest and then diagnosed with septic arthritis due to propagation of Klebsiella pneumoniae in joint fluid culture was represented because of the rarity of such a case.

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2016 Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR

19. Wrist inflammation: a retrospective comparison between septic and non-septic arthritis. (PubMed)

. All septic arthritis patients had normal serum uric acid levels, and two or more raised inflammatory markers (white cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate). In patients with isolated wrist inflammation, the mean C-reactive protein in the septic arthritis group was significantly higher compared with the non-septic arthritis group (mean difference 132 mg/L, 95% CI 30.9-234). In this study, polyarticular involvement did not exclude a septic cause; nor did it imply a non-septic (...) Wrist inflammation: a retrospective comparison between septic and non-septic arthritis. This study aims to identify differences in demographics, clinical and laboratory data between wrist septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis in patients admitted for wrist inflammation. A retrospective review of inpatients from May 2012 to April 2015 was conducted. Seventy-seven patients were included. Non-septic arthritis patients were more likely to have chronic kidney disease, pre-existing gout, or both

2017 Journal of Hand Surgery - European

20. Spotlight Case Part 1: Oligoarticular Septic Arthritis-A Case of Disseminated Pneumococcal Disease

. Discussion Infections of native joints can be caused by a wide range of microorganisms including bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. The greatest morbidity is seen in bacterial (or septic) arthritis because of the high potential for rapid and irreversible joint destruction [1]. The majority of infections are monoarticular, with the knee being the most commonly involved joint. Abnormal joint architecture is the most important risk factor for bacterial arthritis, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (...) arthritis, it has been identified as the underlying pathogen in 6-10% of patients [12,13]. Gram-negative bacilli are isolated in 10-20% of cases, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli being the most common causative agents. The highest risk groups for gram-negative septic arthritis are intravenous drug users, patients at extremes of age, and those with underlying immunocompromise [11]. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an important cause of monoarticular and polyarticular bacterial arthritis among

2015 Clinical Correlations

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