How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

76 results for

Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail

Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail (...) Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail Aka: Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail , Nail Dystrophy due to Trauma From Related Chapters II. Causes Manicure or Pedicure Nail Biting Nail rubbing or other manipulation III. Pathophysiology Nail injures cuticle and nail plate Cuticle may indent nail plate resulting in deformity (e.g. median with midline nail indentation) Inflammation may occur at the proximal nail fold IV. Management Avoid further nail manipulation or Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing

2018 FP Notebook

2. Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail

Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail (...) Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail Aka: Self-Induced Dystrophic Nail , Nail Dystrophy due to Trauma From Related Chapters II. Causes Manicure or Pedicure Nail Biting Nail rubbing or other manipulation III. Pathophysiology Nail injures cuticle and nail plate Cuticle may indent nail plate resulting in deformity (e.g. median with midline nail indentation) Inflammation may occur at the proximal nail fold IV. Management Avoid further nail manipulation or Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing

2015 FP Notebook

3. Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita in an Adult Patient with Previously Unrecognized Mild Dystrophic EB and Biallelic COL7A1 Mutations. (PubMed)

identified compound heterozygous COL7A1 missense c.410G>A (p.Arg137Gln) and splicing c.3674C>T (p.Ala1225_Gln1241del) mutations, previously unrecognized in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). Thus, our patient had RDEB "nails-only" and developed mechanobullous EBA in adulthood. These data support a pathogenic role of circulating autoantibodies to collagen VII in inducing EBA in selected patients with DEB. Unforeseen worsening of skin symptoms in DEB should prompt laboratory investigations for EBA. (...) Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita in an Adult Patient with Previously Unrecognized Mild Dystrophic EB and Biallelic COL7A1 Mutations. Circulating anti-type VII collagen autoantibodies are frequently detected in patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). However, evidence supporting their pathogenic role in inducing epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) has been provided for only one individual with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DDEB). We describe here a patient

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

4. Fungal nail infection

, if possible. Examining for fungal skin infection at other sites. Arranging nail clippings and/or scrapings for fungal microscopy and culture to confirm the diagnosis and underlying cause, if the person wishes to start antifungal treatment. Initial management of fungal nail infection should include advice on: Self-care strategies, such as keeping nails short; wearing non-occlusive footwear; and treating associated tinea pedis. The option of topical antifungal treatment, such as amorolfine nail lacquer (...) safety alerts New safety alerts No new safety alerts since 1 March 2018. Changes in product availability Changes in product availability No changes in product availability since 1 March 2018. Goals and outcome measures Goals and outcome measures Goals Goals To support primary healthcare professionals to: Make an accurate assessment and diagnosis of fungal nail infections. Offer management in primary care including self-care or antifungal drug treatment, if appropriate. Arrange referral

2014 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

5. Nail Surgery (Diagnosis)

. [ ] Vesicles and blisters may also form. Chronic paronychia is characterized by acute exacerbations of self-limiting inflammation and infection followed by remissions. Chronic paronychia commonly occurs in hands that are repeatedly exposed to water. [ ] The proximal nail fold (PNF), the lateral nail fold (LNF), and the cuticle are destroyed. The potential barrier formed by the PNF is impaired, and the cuticle eventually detaches from the nail plate. The loss of seal creates a nidus for retention (...) ) and drug reactions may also induce their formation. The hemorrhages may be single or multiple, and they appear as brown, red, or black linear streaks, usually in the distal one third of the nail. [ ] As the nail grows, the hemorrhages move distally and superficially. They do not tend to blanch on palpation of the nail plate. Splinter hemorrhages that occur proximally near the lunula are frequently associated with systemic disease. [ ] Involvement of multiple nails by these hemorrhages may indicate

2014 eMedicine.com

6. Nail Surgery (Overview)

. [ ] Vesicles and blisters may also form. Chronic paronychia is characterized by acute exacerbations of self-limiting inflammation and infection followed by remissions. Chronic paronychia commonly occurs in hands that are repeatedly exposed to water. [ ] The proximal nail fold (PNF), the lateral nail fold (LNF), and the cuticle are destroyed. The potential barrier formed by the PNF is impaired, and the cuticle eventually detaches from the nail plate. The loss of seal creates a nidus for retention (...) ) and drug reactions may also induce their formation. The hemorrhages may be single or multiple, and they appear as brown, red, or black linear streaks, usually in the distal one third of the nail. [ ] As the nail grows, the hemorrhages move distally and superficially. They do not tend to blanch on palpation of the nail plate. Splinter hemorrhages that occur proximally near the lunula are frequently associated with systemic disease. [ ] Involvement of multiple nails by these hemorrhages may indicate

2014 eMedicine.com

7. Nail Surgery (Treatment)

the PNF from the nail plate. Then, it is repositioned to allow its concave surface to match the curved contour of the ventral surface of the nail plate. [ ] The instrument is advanced until it finally reaches the distal edge of the nail plate. A hemostat is used to gently remove the nail plate. The use of urea ointment to debride and avulse dystrophic nails has been applied in the treatment of onychomycosis, onychogryphosis, psoriasis, and candidal and bacterial infections. [ , , ] Nail plates (...) that are significantly dystrophic appear to respond better to avulsion with urea paste. The benefits of performing nonsurgical nail avulsion with urea ointment include pain relief; a low risk of infection, hemorrhage (ie, bloodless procedure), and other morbidity; a quick improvement after avulsion; and the absence of pain during and after treatment. [ ] Nail avulsion with urea is ideal for the treatment of symptomatic dystrophic nails in patients with diabetic neuropathy, vascular disease, or immunosuppression

2014 eMedicine.com

8. Nail Surgery (Follow-up)

the PNF from the nail plate. Then, it is repositioned to allow its concave surface to match the curved contour of the ventral surface of the nail plate. [ ] The instrument is advanced until it finally reaches the distal edge of the nail plate. A hemostat is used to gently remove the nail plate. The use of urea ointment to debride and avulse dystrophic nails has been applied in the treatment of onychomycosis, onychogryphosis, psoriasis, and candidal and bacterial infections. [ , , ] Nail plates (...) that are significantly dystrophic appear to respond better to avulsion with urea paste. The benefits of performing nonsurgical nail avulsion with urea ointment include pain relief; a low risk of infection, hemorrhage (ie, bloodless procedure), and other morbidity; a quick improvement after avulsion; and the absence of pain during and after treatment. [ ] Nail avulsion with urea is ideal for the treatment of symptomatic dystrophic nails in patients with diabetic neuropathy, vascular disease, or immunosuppression

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Sexual dimorphism in response to a NRF2 inducer in a model for pachyonychia congenita. (PubMed)

Sexual dimorphism in response to a NRF2 inducer in a model for pachyonychia congenita. Sex is an influential factor regarding pathophysiology and therapeutic response in human disease. Pachyonychia congenita is caused by mutations in keratin genes and typified by dystrophic lesions affecting nails, glands, oral mucosa, and palmar-plantar epidermis. Painful palmar-plantar keratoderma (PPK) severely impairs mobility in pachyonychia congenita. Mice genetically null for keratin 16 (Krt16), one

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Journal of Investigative Dermatology

10. Management of Diabetic Foot

of the foot, callus and nail. This should be done at least annually. 1 • Healthcare professionals providing foot-care education should receive regular and updated education in the management of patients at risk for foot ulceration. Temperature monitoring as “self-assessment tool for high-risk diabetic foot” significantly decreases risk of developing foot ulceration compared with standard therapy and structured foot examination. 35, level I However, more evidence is required to show its effectiveness (...) and palpation of the foot. • Skin Skin changes due to vascular insufficiency such as skin atrophy, nail atrophy, diminished pedal hair, prolonged capillary refill time (>2 seconds) and reduced skin temperature are important to be looked for during skin assessment. 9 • Neurological Monofilament test and vibration perception are used to assess peripheral neuropathy, which is a major independent risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration. Sensory examination with a 5.07/10-g SWME monofilament is the single most

2018 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

11. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Long-Term Management of Kawasaki Disease: A Scientific Statement for Health Professionals From the American Heart Association

and current involvement. Patients with aneurysms require life-long and uninterrupted cardiology follow-up. Conclusions: These recommendations provide updated and best evidence-based guidance to healthcare providers who diagnose and manage Kawasaki disease, but clinical decision making should be individualized to specific patient circumstances. Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited febrile illness of unknown cause that predominantly affects children <5 years of age. When initially described (...) of the interleukin (IL) 1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathways. Study of the adaptive immune response demonstrated that both proinflammatory and regulatory T cells can be found in the circulation in the first week after fever onset. Expansion of the regulatory T-cell population after IVIG administration is associated with cessation of fever and clinical improvement. The self-limited nature of the disease coupled with a low rate of recurrence suggests emergence of T- and B-cell memory

2017 American Heart Association

12. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

30–40 y) XD > AD Xq24-27 [ ] Unknown Hypotrichosis (variable),[ ] hypohidrosis, milia, follicular atrophoderma (dorsal hands), and multiple BCCs (aged teens to early 20s) [ ] AD 16q12-q13 [ , ] CYLD [ , ] Cylindroma (forehead, scalp, trunk, and pubic area),[ , ] trichoepithelioma (around nose), spiradenoma, and BCC AD [ ] Unknown Unknown Multiple BCC (infundibulocystic type) AR > AD Unknown Unknown Ectodermal dysplasia (hypotrichosis, hypodontia, and nail dystrophy [anonychia and trachyonychia

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

13. A Case of Non-Hallopeau-Siemens Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (PubMed)

A Case of Non-Hallopeau-Siemens Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare group of heritable mechanobullous disorders that are characterized by blistering and scarring of the skin and mucosae and these lesions are induced by minor trauma, DEB is also associated with nail dystrophy. DEB can be inherited either in an autosomal recessive or dominant fashion. Regardless of the mode of inheritance, DEB is caused by defects of the ultrastructural

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2009 Annals of dermatology

14. British Association of Dermatologists' guidelines for the management of squamous cell carcinoma in situ (Bowen's disease)

present in any part of the nail unit or periungual tissue and can present as hyper- keratotic, papillomatous or warty proliferations, erosions or scaling of the nail fold, whitish cuticle, periungual swelling, paronychia and ?ssure or ulceration of the lateral nail groove, sometimes with granulation-like tissue beneath and scabbing. Sometimes the nail bed becomes dystrophic or ingrown. Subungual involvement is the most common pre- sentation, 115,116 and it may also present with onycholysis (...) against a claim of negligence. 5.0 Plans for guideline revision The proposed revision for this set of recommendations is scheduled for 2019; where necessary, important interim changes will be updated on the BAD website. 6.0 Background 6.1 De?nition Bowen’s disease is a form of intraepidermal (in situ) SCC, orig- inally described in 1912, 5 although the original lesions, located on sites that were not sun exposed, were possibly arsenic induced. Current practice is to consider Bowen’s dis- ease

2014 British Association of Dermatologists

15. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

30–40 y) XD > AD Xq24-27 [ ] Unknown Hypotrichosis (variable),[ ] hypohidrosis, milia, follicular atrophoderma (dorsal hands), and multiple BCCs (aged teens to early 20s) [ ] AD 16q12-q13 [ , ] CYLD [ , ] Cylindroma (forehead, scalp, trunk, and pubic area),[ , ] trichoepithelioma (around nose), spiradenoma, and BCC AD [ ] Unknown Unknown Multiple BCC (infundibulocystic type) AR > AD Unknown Unknown Ectodermal dysplasia (hypotrichosis, hypodontia, and nail dystrophy [anonychia and trachyonychia

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

16. Antifungal Drugs in Treatment of Onychomycosis

to accurately diagnose onychomycosis, with microscopy by KOH and fungal culture being the most frequently used The histopathology of nail clippings can be utilized for diagnosing onychomycosis, with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain that allows easy visualization of fungal hyphae . Digital dermoscopy, also called onychoscopy, is an easy and quick procedure that allows differential diagnosis of onychomycosis from the common nail dystrophies. Dystrophic nails can be a social impediment causing significant (...) embarrassment that affects patient's self-esteem. In addition, thickened nails can be painful, interfere with the function of the nail unit and may cause discomfort in walking, standing and exercising. Though initially presenting as a cosmetic problem, it can eventually lead to permanent disfigurement of the nails and serve as a source of other fungal infections . Due to these significant effects specific questionnaire was designed and validated to assess quality of life in patients with onychomycosis

2017 Clinical Trials

17. Evidence-Based Guideline: Diagnosis and Treatment of Limb-Girdle and Distal Dystrophies

and frontotemporal dementia HMERF = hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure LDM = Laing distal myopathy LGMD = limb-girdle muscular dystrophyLVEF = left ventricular ejection fraction MEB = muscle-eye-brain disease MFM = myofibrillar myopathy MM3= Miyoshi myopathy type III MR = mental retardation PDB = Paget disease of bone PIRCs = percussion-induced rapid contractions RAE = right atrial enlargement ULN = upper limit of normal VO 2 max = maximal oxygen uptake Wmax = maximal workload WWS = Walker (...) ,e206 up to 10–30 times, e163 23–40 times, e24 36 times, e23 20–100 times, e174 or 15–30 times e185 the ULN. Muscle biopsies were characterized by dystrophic changes. e145,e162- e167,e169,e171,e173,e175,e177,e178,e181,e183,e184,e193,e201,e202,e205-e207 Perivascular and/or endomysial 35 inflammatory infiltrates were common. e162,e164,e166,e169,e171,e173,e181,e183,e184,e187-e189,e193,e201,e202 Amyloid deposits were detected by Congo red staining in blood vessel walls and in perimysial connective

2013 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

18. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

thins coarsens Nail thickens Late Changes Muscles shorten and atrophy Joints ankylose moving distal to proximal Autonomic instability (Late) Limb cool and sweaty Sympathetic hyperactivity Sensory Abnormalities (exquisite sensitivity to slight touch) (severe pain from gentle pressure) Bony changes y X. Stages Mild (Days to weeks) Burning pain worse with movement Muscle spasm y may occur Usually self limited Moderate: weeks to months Pain of local hyperesthesia Muscle wasting May radiate up extremity (...) , Sudeck's Atrophy , Sympathetic Dystrophies, Reflex , Sympathetic Dystrophy, Reflex , Syndrome, Shoulder-Hand , Shoulder-Hand Syndromes , Syndromes, Shoulder-Hand , Complex regionl pain syndrom I , RSD - Reflex sympath dystroph , REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY , CRPS TYPE I , CRPS-Complex regn pain synd I , Reflex sympathetic dystrophy of upper extremity , Sudeck's atrophy (diagnosis) , reflex sympathetic dystrophy (diagnosis) , reflex sympathetic dystrophy , reflex sympathetic dystrophy of upper limb

2018 FP Notebook

19. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

thins coarsens Nail thickens Late Changes Muscles shorten and atrophy Joints ankylose moving distal to proximal Autonomic instability (Late) Limb cool and sweaty Sympathetic hyperactivity Sensory Abnormalities (exquisite sensitivity to slight touch) (severe pain from gentle pressure) Bony changes y X. Stages Mild (Days to weeks) Burning pain worse with movement Muscle spasm y may occur Usually self limited Moderate: weeks to months Pain of local hyperesthesia Muscle wasting May radiate up extremity (...) , Sudeck's Atrophy , Sympathetic Dystrophies, Reflex , Sympathetic Dystrophy, Reflex , Syndrome, Shoulder-Hand , Shoulder-Hand Syndromes , Syndromes, Shoulder-Hand , Complex regionl pain syndrom I , RSD - Reflex sympath dystroph , REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY , CRPS TYPE I , CRPS-Complex regn pain synd I , Reflex sympathetic dystrophy of upper extremity , Sudeck's atrophy (diagnosis) , reflex sympathetic dystrophy (diagnosis) , reflex sympathetic dystrophy , reflex sympathetic dystrophy of upper limb

2017 FP Notebook

20. Alopecia areata

hair (alopecia universalis) is rare. Nail changes are seen in 10–15% of people. Alopecia areata occurs when hairs are prematurely converted from the growth (anagen) to the loss (telogen) phase, but the exact cause is unknown. Alopecia areata is a relatively common condition and is estimated to affect 15 in 10,000 people in the UK. It can present at any age, and males and females are affected equally. The prognosis of alopecia areata is unpredictable. Spontaneous remission within one year may (...) hair loss is more unusual. Total loss of scalp hair (alopecia totalis) or scalp and body hair (alopecia universalis) is rare. There may be a band-like pattern of hair loss at the occipital scalp margin (ophiasis) or hair loss at the vertex with occipital and temporal sparing (sisaipho type). Nail changes are seen in 10–15% of people with alopecia areata, typically those with more severe disease. [ ; ; ; ; ] Causes What causes it? Alopecia areata occurs when hairs are prematurely converted from

2014 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>