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Self Skin Exam

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21. Digital vs. Printed Photographs: Impact on Skin Self-Examinations

Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The primary aim is to determine the impact of using digital photographs on a mobile device versus printed photographs on skin self-examination rates. The ease-of-use and overall satisfaction with the two exam modalities will be evaluated. Secondarily, the impact on melanoma thickness at detection, melanoma detection, biopsy, and office visit rates will be evaluated. The study involves patients in the Pigmented Lesion Clinic that have received (...) Experimental: Combined Patients use digital photographs loaded onto a mobile device and a social support network and receive skin exam reminders Behavioral: Digital photographs loaded onto a mobile device Behavioral: Skin exam reminders Behavioral: Social support network Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Skin self-examination rates [ Time Frame: 6 months ] Evaluate if printed photographs alone versus skin self-examinations supplemented with digital photos on a mobile device, or digital

2015 Clinical Trials

22. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Patient Version

States, the number of cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer seems to have increased in recent years. The number of cases of melanoma has increased over the last 30 years. Part of the reason for these increases may be that people are more aware of skin cancer. They are more likely to have exams and do self-exams. As a result, they are more likely to be with skin cancer. From 2006 to 2015, the number of deaths from melanoma decreased slightly among men and women. The number of cases of childhood melanoma (...) . Cancer screening trials also are meant to show whether early detection (finding cancer before it causes ) decreases a person's chance of dying from the disease. For some types of cancer, finding and treating the disease at an early may result in a better chance of . Clinical trials that study cancer screening methods are taking place in many parts of the country. Information about ongoing clinical trials is available from the . Having a skin exam to screen for skin cancer has not been shown

2017 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

23. Testicular Self-Exam

Testicular Self-Exam Testicular Self-Exam Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Testicular Self-Exam Testicular Self-Exam (...) Aka: Testicular Self-Exam , Testicular Self Exam II. Indications screening by young men under age 34 III. Frequency of exam Patient or their partner performs self-exam monthly Consider performing exam during warm shower or bath IV. Technique Cup with one hand and note any changes Check each one at a time Gently roll between fingers and thumb Normal testicular findings Normal variation One may be larger than the other Left tisticle may lie lower than right is normally oval shaped should be firm

2015 FP Notebook

24. Self Breast Exam

Self Breast Exam Self Breast Exam Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Self Breast Exam Self Breast Exam Aka: Self Breast (...) Exam , Breast Self Exam , Breast Self-Exam II. Efficacy Study of 266,000 women in Shanghai, China Intervention: Intensive self exam instruction Control Group: prevention instruction Results No difference in s identified Twice as many benign growths found in BSE group Interpretation Insufficient evidence to recommend for or against References Meta-analysis findings consistent with Shanghai study SBE with no significant impact on mortality Increases the number of biopsies performed III. Precautions

2015 FP Notebook

25. Sunscreen for skin cancer prevention

Sunscreen for skin cancer prevention RACGP - Sunscreen for skin cancer prevention Search Become a student member today for free and be part of the RACGP community A career in general practice Starting the GP journey Enrolments for the 2019.1 OSCE FRACGP exams closing 29 March 2019 Fellowship FRACGP exams Research Practice Experience Program is a self-directed education program designed to support non vocationally registered doctors on their pathway to RACGP Fellowship Fellowship International (...) graduates FRACGP exams RACGP offer courses and events to further develop the knowledge you need to develop your GP career Re-entry to general practice Supervisors and examiners Mental Health (GPMHSC) Research Discover a world of educational opportunities to support your lifelong learning Courses and events QI&CPD Online learning Conferences Become a provider with the QI&CPD Program and be recognised for the quality education and training you offer GPs Curriculum for Australian General Practice Programs

2013 Handbook of Non-Drug interventions (HANDI)

26. Psychosocial consequences of skin cancer screening (PubMed)

level of undress and skin areas examined. Participants who were thoroughly screened: did not differ on negative psychosocial measures; scored higher on measures of positive psychosocial wellbeing (PCQ); and were more motivated to conduct monthly self-examinations and seek annual clinician skin examinations, compared to other participants (p < 0.05). Importantly, thoroughly screened patients were more likely to report skin prevention practices (skin self-examinations to identify a concerning lesion (...) , practitioner provided skin exam), recommend skin examinations to peers, and feel satisfied with their skin cancer education than less thoroughly screened individuals (p < 0.01). Our results suggest that visual screening for skin cancer does not worsen patient psychosocial wellbeing and may be associated with improved skin cancer-related practices and attitudes.

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2018 Preventive medicine reports

27. Association of psychological stress with skin symptoms among medical students (PubMed)

Association of psychological stress with skin symptoms among medical students To evaluate the association between psychological stress and skin symptoms among medical students.  Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and June 2015. Electronic survey consists of Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) and Self-Reported Skin Complaints Questionnaire were distributed to all 1435 undergraduate students at College of Medicine, King Saud University (KSU), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (...) . Results: Final analysis was performed on data from 529 (36.9%) students. Students were divided into three groups: least stressed students, n=135, PSQ index less than 0.39; highly stressed students, n=136, PSQ index greater than 0.61; and moderately stressed students, n=258. Older age, female gender, during exam weeks, and fourth and fifth years of medical school (all p less than 0.01) were associated with the highest perceived stress levels. When compared to least stressed students, highly stressed

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2018 Saudi medical journal

28. Defining Skin Immunity of a Bite of Key Insect Vectors in Humans

Defining Skin Immunity of a Bite of Key Insect Vectors in Humans Defining Skin Immunity of a Bite of Key Insect Vectors in Humans - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Defining Skin Immunity (...) they get infected. The response to bites is caused by the immune system, which helps fight off infections. Researchers want to study the immune response in skin to mosquito or sand fly bites and how the response changes after bites on multiple days. This may help researchers develop better vaccines. Objective: To study the immune response in skin to certain insect bites and how that changes after bites on multiple days. Eligibility: Healthy adults ages 18-64 Design: Participants will be screened under

2018 Clinical Trials

29. Young Melanoma Family Facebook Intervention or Healthy Lifestyle Facebook Intervention in Improving Skin Examination in Participants With Melanoma and Their Families

IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v8 Other: Informational Intervention Other: Survey Administration Not Applicable Detailed Description: PRIMARY OBJECTIVES: I. To examine the efficacy of the Young Melanoma Family Facebook intervention versus the Healthy Lifestyle Facebook intervention on total cutaneous exam (primary outcome), skin self-exam frequency and comprehensiveness, and sun protection practices (secondary outcomes) of first degree relatives (FDRs) of young melanoma survivors. SECONDARY (...) OBJECTIVES: I. To examine the efficacy of the Young Melanoma Family Facebook intervention on patients? skin self-exam frequency and comprehensiveness and sun protection habits. II. To examine the mechanisms of intervention efficacy. OUTLINE: PHASE I: Researchers refine content for the Facebook intervention condition and conduct usability testing. PHASE II: Participants are randomized to 1 of 2 arms. ARM I: Participants join a secret Young Melanoma Family Facebook Group and view post messages focusing

2018 Clinical Trials

30. Protecting Your Skin Is Worth the Effort

By Mallory Lubbock Today, at only 26 years old, I got my first skin cancer spot removed. Soon, I’ll go back to the doctor to have my sutures taken out and my wound checked. Later, I have an appointment to get my whole body checked for more spots that may be skin cancer. I’ll have to go to the doctor regularly for skin exams for the rest of my life, and will probably have to go through the painful experience of having more skin cancers removed in the future. I wish I could tell 16-year-old me to never (...) understand what thry’re Doing to their self! as a farmers daughter and wife, we wore bikini tops baling hay and swimming, detasseling etc. always had a nice tan by the time school started back up. As an adult, going to cosmetology college, always tanned, went to beach got fried, layed out under sprinkler to tan faster. I have never had any skin cancer. At 54, I still do some sun bathing still no skin cancer, my opinion, its in the genes. You’ve been lucky so far, and hopefully, you will have many years

2018 CDC The Topic Is Cancer blog

31. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®) - PDQ Cancer Information Summaries - NCBI Bookshelf Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Cancer Institute (US); 2002-. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): ; 2002 (...) -. Search term Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®) Health Professional Version PDQ Cancer Genetics Editorial Board . Published online: February 14, 2019. Created: July 29, 2009 . This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the genetics of skin cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

32. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

, including both self-examination and clinical examination. Benefits The evidence is inadequate to determine whether visual examination of the skin in asymptomatic individuals leads to a reduction in mortality from melanomatous skin cancer. Further, in asymptomatic populations, the effect of visual skin examination on mortality from nonmelanomatous skin cancers is unknown. Magnitude of Effect : Unknown. Study Design : Direct evidence limited to a single ecologic study. Internal Validity : Poor (...) adults aged 50 years and older; however, data from the same time period indicate that incidence rates stabilized in individuals younger than 50 years.[ ] From 2006 to 2015, mortality rates declined by 1% per year in individuals aged 50 years and older and declined by 2.6% per year in individuals younger than 50 years.[ ] The long-term rise in incidence rates is caused, at least in part, by screening in clinical settings and self-examination resulting from campaigns to increase skin cancer awareness

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

33. Oral Nutraceutical Supplement With Standardized Botanicals in Males With Self-Perceived Thinning Hair and Loss

Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Males between 21-45 years of age, inclusive Have self-reported thinning or hair loss for more than 3 months prior to screening Clinically confirmed to have hair loss or thinning by the investigator via physical exam, including subjects with male pattern hair loss with frontal and vertex patterns II, IIIv or IV using the Norwood Hamilton Hair Loss Scale (NHS). In good general health, as determined by the Investigator Willing and able to attend all study visits Willing (...) Oral Nutraceutical Supplement With Standardized Botanicals in Males With Self-Perceived Thinning Hair and Loss Oral Nutraceutical Supplement With Standardized Botanicals in Males With Self-Perceived Thinning Hair and Loss - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved

2018 Clinical Trials

34. Cosmetic Study to Improve the Appearance of Skin Afflicted With Mild to Moderate Atopic Dermatitis.

the arm the product is to be applied to. Subjects will be instructed in the use of the spray bottle and asked to self-administer the Test Product as follows: LEFT arm where skin is affected: 4 pumps of Spray which is labeled accordingly must be applied twice-a-day to the area on the arm affected by AD- once in the morning and once in the evening for 30 days. RIGHT arm where skin is affected: 4pumps of Spray which is labeled accordingly must be applied twice-a-day to the area on the arm affected by AD (...) - once in the morning and once in the evening for 30 days. Placebo Comparator: Placebo Placebo Other: Placebo Subjects receive 2 bottles of product at the Baseline visit for left and right side application. One bottle will contain Placebo only, the other bottle will contain "AO+Mist". Label on each bottle will indicate the arm the product is to be applied to. Subjects will be instructed in the use of the spray bottle and asked to self-administer the Test Product as follows: LEFT arm where skin

2017 Clinical Trials

35. Cosmetic Study of AO+Mist in Improving the Appearance of Skin Afflicted With Keratosis Pilaris

bottle and asked to self-administer the Test Product as follows: LEFT side of the body where skin is affected: Five (5) pumps of Spray (BOTTLE LABELED: LEFT) must be applied twice-a-day to the entire area affected by KP once in the morning and once in the evening for 28 days. RIGHT side of the body where skin is affected: Five (5) pumps of Spray (BOTTLE LABELED: RIGHT) must be applied twice-a-day to the entire area affected by KP once in the morning and once in the evening for 28 days. Subjects may (...) not wash their body with soap and water AFTER the applications Other: AO+Mist Subjects are instructed in the use of the spray bottle and asked to self-administer the Test Product as follows: LEFT side of the body where skin is affected: Five (5) pumps of Spray (BOTTLE LABELED: LEFT) must be applied twice-a-day to the entire area affected by KP once in the morning and once in the evening for 28 days. RIGHT side of the body where skin is affected: Five (5) pumps of Spray (BOTTLE LABELED: RIGHT) must

2017 Clinical Trials

36. Skin Examination Practices Among Melanoma Survivors and their Children (PubMed)

Skin Examination Practices Among Melanoma Survivors and their Children Many professional organizations recommend skin self-examination (SSE) as a tool for early detection of malignancy among melanoma survivors, a growing population that is at increased risk for new or recurrent melanoma. This study examined the frequency and correlates of SSE use among melanoma survivors. Additionally, we assessed skin exam use among children of survivors, who are at elevated lifetime risk for the disease (...) performed monthly skin self-exams, a lower rate than that observed in previous studies. Although greater family history of melanoma, use of skin protection strategies, and the perceived severity of melanom were associated with more frequent use of skin self-exams, these relationships disappeared in adjusted analyses. Participants reported unexpectedly frequent use of skin examinations for their children despite the lack of professional guidelines for this practice. Interventions are needed to improve

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2017 Journal of cancer education : the official journal of the American Association for Cancer Education

37. Tattoos as a window to the psyche: How talking about skin art can inform psychiatric practice (PubMed)

clinicians working with tattooed patients to facilitate an exploration of the personal meaning of skin art and self-identity. We suggest that as a kind of augmentation of the physical exam, looking at and talking to patients about their tattoos can provide a valuable window into the psyche, informing clinical practice. (...) Tattoos as a window to the psyche: How talking about skin art can inform psychiatric practice Tattooing the skin as a means of personal expression is a ritualized practice that has been around for centuries across many different cultures. Accordingly, the symbolic meaning of tattoos has evolved over time and is highly individualized, from both the internal perspective of the wearer and the external perspective of an observer. Within modern Western societies through the 1970s, tattoos

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2017 World journal of psychiatry

38. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to medical advice on skin self-examination during melanoma follow-up care. (PubMed)

study examines key psychosocial variables related to the acquisition and to the long-term maintenance of skin self-examination in 200 patients with melanoma. Practice of self-exam behaviors is assessed at 3 and 12 months after receiving an educational intervention designed based on best-practice standards. Examined predictors of skin self-exam behaviors include biological sex, perceived self-exam efficacy, distress, partner and physician support, and coping strategies. Qualitative analyses of semi (...) Barriers and facilitators of adherence to medical advice on skin self-examination during melanoma follow-up care. Melanoma is the fastest growing tumor of the skin, which disproportionately affects younger and middle-aged adults. As melanomas are visible, recognizable, and highly curable while in early stages, early diagnosis is one of the most effective measures to decrease melanoma-related mortality. Skin self-examination results in earlier detection and removal of the melanoma. Due

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2013 BMC Dermatology

39. Safety and Performance Evaluation of the Topical Hemostatic Device (AC5â„¢) Following Excision of Skin Lesions

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: Other Study ID Numbers: AC5-1 First Posted: March 9, 2016 Results First Posted: August 7, 2018 Last Update Posted: August 7, 2018 Last Verified: August 2018 Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement: Plan to Share IPD: Undecided Keywords provided by ARCH Therapuetics: topical hemostat self-assembling peptide barrier Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Skin Neoplasms Neoplasms by Site Neoplasms Skin Diseases Hemostatics Coagulants (...) Safety and Performance Evaluation of the Topical Hemostatic Device (AC5â„¢) Following Excision of Skin Lesions Safety and Performance Evaluation of the Topical Hemostatic Device (AC5™) Following Excision of Skin Lesions - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies

2016 Clinical Trials

40. Study of Skin Cells That Stop Replicating (Senescent) During Wound Healing

in young and old individuals. This study is being done to look at how cells in your body respond to small skin wounds. This information may help treat age-related diseases. Objective: To study how cells in the body respond to small skin wounds. Eligibility: Healthy adults ages 20-39 or 70+ Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood sample. They will fast before the screening visit. Women will have a urine pregnancy test. Participants will have 3 study visits (...) Study of Skin Cells That Stop Replicating (Senescent) During Wound Healing Study of Skin Cells That Stop Replicating (Senescent) During Wound Healing - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Study

2016 Clinical Trials

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