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21. Dengue fever-associated necrotizing scleritis: A case report with long-term follow-up. (PubMed)

Dengue fever-associated necrotizing scleritis: A case report with long-term follow-up. Dengue fever is a notable emerging infectious disease that is now seen worldwide, with an estimated incidence of approximately 390 million cases per year. Although ocular complications are uncommon among dengue fever-infected patients, caution is needed to prevent vision loss. Here we report a potentially serious sight-threatening complication of dengue fever, dengue fever-associated necrotizing (...) . Since additional systemic examinations identified no autoimmune diseases such as rheumatism, we diagnosed the patient as dengue fever-associated scleritis.Intensive systemic and topical steroids were administrated during the initial acute phase. Over the next 15 months, the amount of steroid was tapered off.Initial findings for the scleritis gradually declined in response to steroid treatment. Although there was no recurrence of active scleritis, gradual thinning of the sclera continued to occur

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2018 Medicine

22. Successful management of bee sting induced Aspergillus fumigatus endophthalmitis and scleritis (PubMed)

Successful management of bee sting induced Aspergillus fumigatus endophthalmitis and scleritis Ocular bee stings are known to cause corneal melts, corneal infiltrates, cataracts, and secondary glaucoma. Our patient presented with scleritis, corneal infiltrates, and endophthalmitis after a ocular bee sting. Topical treatment led to resolution of anterior segment inflammation, but the scleritis and vitreous inflammation worsened. Vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotics was done and scrapings (...) from the scleral abscess showed growth of Aspergillus fumigatus on culture. Repeat vitrectomy with silicone oil was needed for retinal detachment. Oral and intravitreal antifungals led to resolution of inflammation with attached retina. This is the first reported case of bee sting-induced fungal endophthalmitis with scleritis.

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2018 Indian journal of ophthalmology

23. Cyclophosphamide vs. Infliximab for Refractory Idiopathic Scleritis (CIRIS)

Cyclophosphamide vs. Infliximab for Refractory Idiopathic Scleritis (CIRIS) Cyclophosphamide vs. Infliximab for Refractory Idiopathic Scleritis (CIRIS) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more (...) . Cyclophosphamide vs. Infliximab for Refractory Idiopathic Scleritis (CIRIS) (CIRIS) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03088293 Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting First Posted : March 23, 2017 Last Update Posted

2017 Clinical Trials

24. Anterior scleritis following intravitreal injections in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: A case report. (PubMed)

Anterior scleritis following intravitreal injections in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: A case report. Surgically induced scleritis is a rare complication following ophthalmologic surgery such as cataract surgery, pterygium excision, strabismus surgery, and retinal detachment repair. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the connective tissue disease most commonly associated with scleritis.A 70-year-old woman visited our clinic with complaint of visual disturbance, ocular pain, and conjunctival (...) injection in her right eye of 1 month's duration. She had a stable state of rheumatoid factor positive RA and had a history of multiple intravitreal injections placed in the symptomatic right eye due to age-related macular degeneration.Anterior scleritis induced by multiple intravitreal injections.Topical and systemic steroids were administered.Her symptoms and signs were relieved and no significant recurrence has been occurred with the maintenance of low dose oral steroid.Surgically induced scleritis

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2017 Medicine

25. Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis following strabismus surgery treated successfully with topical N-acetylcysteine in a child with congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles and Varadi Papp syndrome. (PubMed)

Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis following strabismus surgery treated successfully with topical N-acetylcysteine in a child with congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles and Varadi Papp syndrome. Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis (SINS) is a rare but serious disorder that can develop many years after strabismus surgery. It is generally treated with high-dose steroids or immunosuppression.We describe a patient with Varadi Papp syndrome and congenital fibrosis of the extraocular (...) muscles, who developed surgically induced necrotizing scleritis a month after strabismus surgery and was successfully managed by oral vitamin C and topical N-acetylcysteine 10%.While SINS is conventionally treated with steroids/immunosuppression, a conservative approach may be tried in milder cases. The role of topical N-acetylcysteine in managing this complication needs to be explored.

2017 Strabismus

26. Virulence genome analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA10 recovered from patient with scleritis (PubMed)

Virulence genome analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA10 recovered from patient with scleritis Infectious keratitis is a major cause of blindness, next to cataract and majority of cases are mainly caused by gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). In this study, we investigated a P. aeruginosa VRFPA10 genome which exhibited susceptibility to commonly used drugs in vitro but the patient had poor prognosis due to its hyper virulent nature. Genomic analysis of VRFPA10

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2017 Genomics data

27. Ocular Autoimmune Systemic Inflammatory Infectious Study (OASIS)—report 4: analysis and outcome of scleritis in an East Asian population (PubMed)

Ocular Autoimmune Systemic Inflammatory Infectious Study (OASIS)—report 4: analysis and outcome of scleritis in an East Asian population The purpose of this study is to evaluate the spectrum of scleritis from database of Ocular Autoimmune Systemic Inflammatory Infectious Study (OASIS) at a tertiary eye referral eye institute in Singapore. Clinical records of 120 patients with scleritis from a database of 2200 patients from Ocular Autoimmune Systemic Inflammatory Infectious Study (OASIS) were (...) reviewed.56.6% were females, with a mean age of 48.6 ± 15.9 years. 75 (62.5%) had diffuse anterior scleritis, 25 (20.8%) had nodular anterior scleritis, 7 (5.8%) had necrotizing anterior scleritis and 13 (10.8%) had posterior scleritis. Ocular complications were observed in 53.3% of patients, including anterior uveitis (42.5%), raised intraocular pressure (12.5%), and corneal involvement (11.7%). Autoimmune causes were associated with 31 (25.8%) of patients, and 10 (8.3%) patients had an associated

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2017 Journal of ophthalmic inflammation and infection

28. An OCT Study of Anterior Nodular Episcleritis and Scleritis (PubMed)

An OCT Study of Anterior Nodular Episcleritis and Scleritis Anterior scleritis and episcleritis are a well-known presentation in tuberculosis. The case of a female patient with presumed tuberculous anterior scleritis and episcleritis is discussed in this article. Anterior segment OCT was efficient in diagnosis and evaluation of the therapeutic outcome. Antituberculosis chemotherapy was sufficient to achieve clinical remission.

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2017 Case reports in ophthalmological medicine

29. When an Easy Thing Goes Wrong: Foreign Body Induced Granuloma-Associated Scleritis Following Pterygium Surgery (PubMed)

When an Easy Thing Goes Wrong: Foreign Body Induced Granuloma-Associated Scleritis Following Pterygium Surgery To report a case of pterygium surgery with conjunctival autograft followed by focal necrotizing scleritis due to foreign body entrapment in the scleral bed.This is a case report of a 76-years-old male patient who underwent nasal pterygium surgery and developed focal necrotizing scleritis secondary to foreign body entrapment under conjunctival autograft. One month following surgery

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2017 Case reports in ophthalmology

30. Pseudomonas Scleritis following Pterygium Excision (PubMed)

Pseudomonas Scleritis following Pterygium Excision The aim of this case report was to describe a patient who presented with Pseudomonas scleritis after pterygium excision. The study was conducted at the Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University in Chiang Mai, Thailand.The record of a patient who was diagnosed as Pseudomonas scleritis after pterygium excision was retrospectively reviewed for history, clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, treatments (...) , and outcomes.We described a 66-year-old male patient with a history of pterygium excision in his right eye 10 years ago, he presented with infectious scleritis. Scleral thinning, tissue necrosis, and overlying calcified plaque were found. The culture of scleral scraping revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Topical fortified amikacin (20 mg/mL) and intravenous ceftazidime were started. Urgent surgical debridement of scleral infiltrates and irrigation of necrotic sclera and surrounding conjunctiva with fortified

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2017 Case reports in ophthalmology

31. Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis Accompanying Scleritis (PubMed)

Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis Accompanying Scleritis 28794383 2018 11 13 1349-7235 56 17 2017 09 01 Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan) Intern. Med. Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis Accompanying Scleritis. 2383-2384 10.2169/internalmedicine.8850-17 Oka Kosuke K Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Japan. Ocho Kazuki K Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry (...) and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Japan. Iwamuro Masaya M Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Japan. Otsuka Fumio F Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Japan. eng Journal Article 2017 08 10 Japan Intern Med 9204241 0918-2918 headache hypertrophic pachymeningitis scleritis 2017 8 11 6 0 2017 8 11 6 1 2017 8 11 6 0 ppublish 28794383 10.2169

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2017 Internal Medicine

32. IgG4-Related Disease Presenting as Isolated Scleritis (PubMed)

IgG4-Related Disease Presenting as Isolated Scleritis A rare case of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) manifesting as nodular scleritis is presented in a 20-year-old female. Patient complained of left eye pain and redness for one week. Ocular examination together with ancillary testing led to the diagnosis of nodular scleritis. Since the patient did not show apparent improvement after one week of systemic steroidal treatment, she underwent a biopsy of the affected area revealing histopathological (...) characteristics of IgG4-RD. Long-term treatment with corticosteroids and a steroid-sparing agent (methotrexate) led to significant improvement in signs and symptoms. This case highlights the significance of IgG4-RD in the differential diagnosis of scleritis and raises the question as to whether various organs affected by IgG4-RD may have different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in which pathogenic T cells play a role.

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2017 Case reports in ophthalmological medicine

33. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma scleritis in a case of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis) (PubMed)

Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma scleritis in a case of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis) The purpose of this study was to describe a case of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma scleritis in a 53-year-old male with unilateral progressive visual loss, scleritis, prolonged fever, and multiple mononeuropathy. Scleral biopsy showed necrosis with small abscess, and the pathological tissues revealed submucosal infiltration of mononucleated foamy histiocytes (xanthoma cells (...) and later with intravenous cyclophosphamide monthly. He responded well to treatment, both eye and systemic conditions. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma scleritis could be an early presentation of granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

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2017 International medical case reports journal

34. Ocular metastasis from breast carcinoma simulating anterior scleritis: a case report (PubMed)

Ocular metastasis from breast carcinoma simulating anterior scleritis: a case report Breast cancer is one of the commonest sources of ocular metastasis. Patients with ocular metastatic disease can present with a variable clinical picture. Patients with a history of breast cancer presenting with any eye symptom should be evaluated with consideration of ocular metastasis.We report a case of ocular metastasis in a 46-year-old Brahmin woman presenting with right eye pain. She had been treated (...) for stage IIIc left-sided breast cancer 2 years ago with six cycles of chemotherapy with docetaxel, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide after undergoing modified radical mastectomy. An ophthalmic examination revealed a tender subconjunctival swelling superotemporally on retracting right upper eyelid. This finding alone indicated anterior scleritis. On examining fundus under mydriasis, an amelanotic subretinal mass could be visualized in the posterior pole superotemporal to macula. An orbital magnetic

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2017 Journal of medical case reports

35. Three atypical manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis: lateral medullary syndrome, anterior cheek mass and melting scleritis of eye (PubMed)

Three atypical manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis: lateral medullary syndrome, anterior cheek mass and melting scleritis of eye Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener granulomatosis) is a vasculitis with various organ involvement. There have been a few cases of CNS stroke and rare cases of lateral medullary infarction (LMI) as a manifestation of GPA. Also there have been reports of sinuses, nose and laryngeal masses mistakenly referred as carcinomas (...) and subsequently GPA was diagnosed in their pathological reports. Another severe fulminant manifestation can be necrotizing scleritis leading to perforation of sclera. Therefore, here we present some rare and fulminant manifestations of GPA in 3 separate cases for further emphasis of the unusual manifestations of GPA that should always be kept in mind.

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2017 Reumatologia

36. Systemic Cyclosporine Therapy for Scleritis: A Proposal of a Novel System to Assess the Activity of Scleritis (PubMed)

Systemic Cyclosporine Therapy for Scleritis: A Proposal of a Novel System to Assess the Activity of Scleritis In the present study, two female patients with unilateral scleritis without systemic complications were examined. Both patients were suffering from ocular pain and received corticosteroid therapy. The first patient, a 45-year-old woman, was diagnosed with scleritis and iritis in her right eye. Topical corticosteroid treatment could eradicate the iritis but not the scleritis. Oral (...) corticosteroid administration and corticosteroid pulse therapy were applied with little effect. The application of systemic cyclosporine had a satisfactory effect in controlling the scleritis. The other patient, a 60-year-old woman, was suffering from scleritis and lid swelling in her right eye. Not only did topical and systemic corticosteroid therapy prove insufficient, they also resulted in the elevation of her intraocular pressure. After termination of corticosteroid therapy, the systemic cyclosporine

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2015 Case reports in ophthalmology

37. Second report of a Nocardia beijingensis infection in the United States: nodular scleritis with in vitro imipenem resistance (PubMed)

Second report of a Nocardia beijingensis infection in the United States: nodular scleritis with in vitro imipenem resistance We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with scleritis caused by an imipenem-resistant strain of Nocardia beijingensis. The patient presented with pain, redness, and nodules on the sclera of 8 weeks' duration. A Gram stain from a nodule on the superonasal aspect of the globe was initially negative. After empiric treatment for an autoimmune etiology, cytopathology (...) confirmed filamentous bacteria. A presumptive diagnosis of Nocardia scleritis was made, and medical management was based on a literature review on treatments for Nocardia infections. Cultures returned confirming Nocardia beijingensis. Antibiotic sensitivity testing confirmed the correct initial management. The patient's scleritis resolved with a good visual outcome.

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2016 Digital Journal of Ophthalmology : DJO

38. Infectious Pseudomonas and Bipolaris scleritis following history of pterygium surgery (PubMed)

Infectious Pseudomonas and Bipolaris scleritis following history of pterygium surgery We report an interesting case of infectious scleritis from coinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bipolaris with no corneal infiltrate. A healthy 60-year-old man with a history of infectious scleritis following pterygium excision presented with purulent material growing P. aeruginosa and 1+ colonies of Bipolaris species of fungus. Broad spectrum treatment was initiated with hourly topical moxifloxacin

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2016 Indian journal of ophthalmology

39. Occult Fungal Scleritis (PubMed)

Occult Fungal Scleritis To heighten awareness of occult fungal scleritis.Case report and review of the literature.A 73-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was diagnosed for 3 months with immune-mediated scleritis and subsequently treated with corticosteroids. On referral, the patient had a scleral nodule with contiguous corneal infiltrate and hypopyon. Culture grew Fusarium species not further classified. The infection could not be controlled with antifungal therapy, and the eye was removed (...) . No exogenous or endogenous source for the infection could be identified by clinical history or examination.Fungal scleritis can develop in persons without a history of foreign body injury, minor trauma, or evidence of endogenous fungemia. A high index of suspicion for infectious scleritis must be maintained in persons with presumed immune-mediated scleritis who fail to respond to conventional therapy, particularly if they present with decreased visual acuity.

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2016 Ocular oncology and pathology

40. Latent tuberculosis-related scleritis: a case report (PubMed)

Latent tuberculosis-related scleritis: a case report Scleritis is a painful inflammatory process centered in the sclera that may involve the cornea and the underlying uvea. The etiology is commonly idiopathic or autoimmune but some cases are associated with systemic infection such as tuberculosis.In this report, we describe an unusual case of a female Moroccan patient who had a long history of bilateral recurrent scleritis associated with peripheral keratopathy and anterior uveitis. The patient (...) was diagnosed with latent tuberculosis and responded to antitubercular therapy administrated after exclusion of other aetiologies. This patient was finally diagnosed with latent tuberculosis- related scleritis.Although systemic tuberculosis is reported as a possible cause of scleritis and other ocular inflammatory manifestations, assessment of the diagnosis of tuberculosis-related ocular inflammation is challenging especially in latent forms. The treatment is largely presumptive. However, a favorable

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2016 BMC research notes

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