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Salicylic Acid Plaster

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21. A Psoriasis Plaque Test Trial With LEO 90100 Compared to Betesil® in Patients With Psoriasis Vulgaris

and during the trial: WHO group I-II corticosteroids (except if used for treatment of scalp and/or facial psoriasis) Topical retinoids, Vitamin D analogues, Topical immunomodulators (e.g. calcineurin inhibitors), Tar products, Salicylic acid Subjects using emollients on the selected plaques within 1 week before randomisation and during the trial Initiation of, or expected changes to concomitant medication that may affect psoriasis vulgaris (e.g., beta blockers, antimalarial drugs, lithium and ACE (...) , 2017 Last Update Posted : June 1, 2017 Sponsor: LEO Pharma Information provided by (Responsible Party): LEO Pharma Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anti-psoriatic effect of LEO 90100 aerosol foam compared with Betesil® medicated plaster Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases Drug: LEO 90100 Aerosol foam Drug: Betesil® 2.25 mg Phase 2 Detailed Description: The products will be applied on 6

2015 Clinical Trials

22. Yellow Fever (Overview)

fresh frozen plasma to maintain prothrombin time at 25-30 seconds In patients with DIC, heparin has been recommended for treatment Additional supportive care recommendations for patients with yellow fever include the following: A nasogastric or orogastric tube may be required to provide nutritional support Patients with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Prevention (...) ). Patient education Recommend yellow fever vaccination for international travelers going to endemic regions. Current information, including new outbreaks and information for travelers, can be obtained online from the and the . Previous Next: Etiology Yellow fever virus is a positive-sense, single-stranded, ribonucleic acid (RNA) ̶ enveloped flavivirus with a diameter of about 50-60 nm. The virus is transmitted via the saliva of an infected mosquito. Local replication of the virus takes place in the skin

2014 eMedicine.com

23. Corns (Treatment)

on dynamic pressure molds. Reduction of heel height may be helpful for patients with metacarpal head callosities. [ ] Vacuum orthoses have been described to aid in lesional clearance for diabetic patients with plantar callosities. [ ] Following are additional treatment modalities: Keratolytics: Products that can be applied to affected areas include 40% salicylic acid pads and plaster, 40% urea cream, and 12% lactic acid cream. [ , ] However, patients with peripheral neuropathies should avoid topical (...) walkers reduce foot loading in patients with diabetes mellitus. Gait Posture . 2009 Jul. 30 (1):11-5. . Cordoro KM, Ganz JE. Training room management of medical conditions: sports dermatology. Clin Sports Med . 2005 Jul. 24(3):565-98, viii-ix. . Stephenson J, Farndon L, Concannon M. Analysis of a trial assessing the long-term effectiveness of salicylic acid plasters compared with scalpel debridement in facilitating corn resolution in patients with multiple corns. J Dermatol . 2016 Jun. 43 (6):662-9

2014 eMedicine.com

24. Clavus (Overview)

foot loading in patients with diabetes mellitus. Gait Posture . 2009 Jul. 30 (1):11-5. . Cordoro KM, Ganz JE. Training room management of medical conditions: sports dermatology. Clin Sports Med . 2005 Jul. 24(3):565-98, viii-ix. . Stephenson J, Farndon L, Concannon M. Analysis of a trial assessing the long-term effectiveness of salicylic acid plasters compared with scalpel debridement in facilitating corn resolution in patients with multiple corns. J Dermatol . 2016 Jun. 43 (6):662-9. . Balkin SW (...) , and clavi]. MMW Fortschr Med . 2007 Mar 8. 149 (10):31-3. . Dainichi T, Honma Y, Hashimoto T, Furue M. Clavus detected incidentally by positron emission tomography with computed tomography. J Dermatol . 2008 Apr. 35 (4):242-3. . Sage RA, Webster JK, Fisher SG. Outpatient care and morbidity reduction in diabetic foot ulcers associated with chronic pressure callus. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc . 2001 Jun. 91(6):275-9. . Thomas JR 3rd, Doyle JA. The therapeutic uses of topical vitamin A acid. J Am Acad Dermatol

2014 eMedicine.com

25. Corns (Overview)

foot loading in patients with diabetes mellitus. Gait Posture . 2009 Jul. 30 (1):11-5. . Cordoro KM, Ganz JE. Training room management of medical conditions: sports dermatology. Clin Sports Med . 2005 Jul. 24(3):565-98, viii-ix. . Stephenson J, Farndon L, Concannon M. Analysis of a trial assessing the long-term effectiveness of salicylic acid plasters compared with scalpel debridement in facilitating corn resolution in patients with multiple corns. J Dermatol . 2016 Jun. 43 (6):662-9. . Balkin SW (...) , and clavi]. MMW Fortschr Med . 2007 Mar 8. 149 (10):31-3. . Dainichi T, Honma Y, Hashimoto T, Furue M. Clavus detected incidentally by positron emission tomography with computed tomography. J Dermatol . 2008 Apr. 35 (4):242-3. . Sage RA, Webster JK, Fisher SG. Outpatient care and morbidity reduction in diabetic foot ulcers associated with chronic pressure callus. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc . 2001 Jun. 91(6):275-9. . Thomas JR 3rd, Doyle JA. The therapeutic uses of topical vitamin A acid. J Am Acad Dermatol

2014 eMedicine.com

26. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scar (Treatment)

of collagen resynthesis, cleaving imidodipeptides containing C-terminal, and making proline available for its recycling and further generation of new collagen. Muszynska et al demonstrated this process in cultured human skin fibroblasts, also suggesting that this inhibition is a posttranslational event. [ , ] Other agents such as doxycycline, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ie, acetylsalicylic acid, sodium salicylate, phenylbutazone, indomethacin), daunorubicin, gentamicin, netilmicin (...) scars and keloids includes occlusive dressings, compression therapy, intralesional corticosteroid injections, cryosurgery, excision, radiation therapy, laser therapy, interferon (IFN) therapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin, bleomycin, verapamil, retinoic acid, imiquimod 5% cream, tamoxifen, tacrolimus, botulinum toxin, hydrogel scaffold, and over-the-counter treatments (eg, onion extract; combination of hydrocortisone, silicon, and vitamin E). Other promising therapies include antiangiogenic

2014 eMedicine.com

27. Yellow Fever (Treatment)

with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Transmission prevention Because viremic patients bitten by mosquitoes can transmit the virus to other patients, the patient should be isolated with mosquito netting in areas with potential vector mosquitoes. Yellow fever virus is not transmitted person to person, but other infections in the differential diagnoses can be transmitted; thus (...) acid-base disturbances and metabolic acidosis via arterial blood gas sampling. Replacement of red blood cells and clotting components will be necessary to treat hemorrhage and shock. Consider vasopressor support for those patients who remain hypotensive despite volume resuscitation and further management of shock. Patients with respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), or both may require endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. In those cases, nasogastric suction

2014 eMedicine.com

28. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scar (Follow-up)

of collagen resynthesis, cleaving imidodipeptides containing C-terminal, and making proline available for its recycling and further generation of new collagen. Muszynska et al demonstrated this process in cultured human skin fibroblasts, also suggesting that this inhibition is a posttranslational event. [ , ] Other agents such as doxycycline, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ie, acetylsalicylic acid, sodium salicylate, phenylbutazone, indomethacin), daunorubicin, gentamicin, netilmicin (...) scars and keloids includes occlusive dressings, compression therapy, intralesional corticosteroid injections, cryosurgery, excision, radiation therapy, laser therapy, interferon (IFN) therapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin, bleomycin, verapamil, retinoic acid, imiquimod 5% cream, tamoxifen, tacrolimus, botulinum toxin, hydrogel scaffold, and over-the-counter treatments (eg, onion extract; combination of hydrocortisone, silicon, and vitamin E). Other promising therapies include antiangiogenic

2014 eMedicine.com

29. Yellow Fever (Treatment)

with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Transmission prevention Because viremic patients bitten by mosquitoes can transmit the virus to other patients, the patient should be isolated with mosquito netting in areas with potential vector mosquitoes. Yellow fever virus is not transmitted person to person, but other infections in the differential diagnoses can be transmitted; thus (...) acid-base disturbances and metabolic acidosis via arterial blood gas sampling. Replacement of red blood cells and clotting components will be necessary to treat hemorrhage and shock. Consider vasopressor support for those patients who remain hypotensive despite volume resuscitation and further management of shock. Patients with respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), or both may require endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. In those cases, nasogastric suction

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

30. Yellow Fever (Follow-up)

with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Transmission prevention Because viremic patients bitten by mosquitoes can transmit the virus to other patients, the patient should be isolated with mosquito netting in areas with potential vector mosquitoes. Yellow fever virus is not transmitted person to person, but other infections in the differential diagnoses can be transmitted; thus (...) acid-base disturbances and metabolic acidosis via arterial blood gas sampling. Replacement of red blood cells and clotting components will be necessary to treat hemorrhage and shock. Consider vasopressor support for those patients who remain hypotensive despite volume resuscitation and further management of shock. Patients with respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), or both may require endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. In those cases, nasogastric suction

2014 eMedicine.com

31. Corns (Follow-up)

on dynamic pressure molds. Reduction of heel height may be helpful for patients with metacarpal head callosities. [ ] Vacuum orthoses have been described to aid in lesional clearance for diabetic patients with plantar callosities. [ ] Following are additional treatment modalities: Keratolytics: Products that can be applied to affected areas include 40% salicylic acid pads and plaster, 40% urea cream, and 12% lactic acid cream. [ , ] However, patients with peripheral neuropathies should avoid topical (...) walkers reduce foot loading in patients with diabetes mellitus. Gait Posture . 2009 Jul. 30 (1):11-5. . Cordoro KM, Ganz JE. Training room management of medical conditions: sports dermatology. Clin Sports Med . 2005 Jul. 24(3):565-98, viii-ix. . Stephenson J, Farndon L, Concannon M. Analysis of a trial assessing the long-term effectiveness of salicylic acid plasters compared with scalpel debridement in facilitating corn resolution in patients with multiple corns. J Dermatol . 2016 Jun. 43 (6):662-9

2014 eMedicine.com

32. Yellow Fever (Diagnosis)

fresh frozen plasma to maintain prothrombin time at 25-30 seconds In patients with DIC, heparin has been recommended for treatment Additional supportive care recommendations for patients with yellow fever include the following: A nasogastric or orogastric tube may be required to provide nutritional support Patients with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Prevention (...) ). Patient education Recommend yellow fever vaccination for international travelers going to endemic regions. Current information, including new outbreaks and information for travelers, can be obtained online from the and the . Previous Next: Etiology Yellow fever virus is a positive-sense, single-stranded, ribonucleic acid (RNA) ̶ enveloped flavivirus with a diameter of about 50-60 nm. The virus is transmitted via the saliva of an infected mosquito. Local replication of the virus takes place in the skin

2014 eMedicine.com

33. Corns (Diagnosis)

foot loading in patients with diabetes mellitus. Gait Posture . 2009 Jul. 30 (1):11-5. . Cordoro KM, Ganz JE. Training room management of medical conditions: sports dermatology. Clin Sports Med . 2005 Jul. 24(3):565-98, viii-ix. . Stephenson J, Farndon L, Concannon M. Analysis of a trial assessing the long-term effectiveness of salicylic acid plasters compared with scalpel debridement in facilitating corn resolution in patients with multiple corns. J Dermatol . 2016 Jun. 43 (6):662-9. . Balkin SW (...) , and clavi]. MMW Fortschr Med . 2007 Mar 8. 149 (10):31-3. . Dainichi T, Honma Y, Hashimoto T, Furue M. Clavus detected incidentally by positron emission tomography with computed tomography. J Dermatol . 2008 Apr. 35 (4):242-3. . Sage RA, Webster JK, Fisher SG. Outpatient care and morbidity reduction in diabetic foot ulcers associated with chronic pressure callus. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc . 2001 Jun. 91(6):275-9. . Thomas JR 3rd, Doyle JA. The therapeutic uses of topical vitamin A acid. J Am Acad Dermatol

2014 eMedicine.com

34. Yellow Fever (Follow-up)

with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Transmission prevention Because viremic patients bitten by mosquitoes can transmit the virus to other patients, the patient should be isolated with mosquito netting in areas with potential vector mosquitoes. Yellow fever virus is not transmitted person to person, but other infections in the differential diagnoses can be transmitted; thus (...) acid-base disturbances and metabolic acidosis via arterial blood gas sampling. Replacement of red blood cells and clotting components will be necessary to treat hemorrhage and shock. Consider vasopressor support for those patients who remain hypotensive despite volume resuscitation and further management of shock. Patients with respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), or both may require endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. In those cases, nasogastric suction

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

35. Yellow Fever (Overview)

fresh frozen plasma to maintain prothrombin time at 25-30 seconds In patients with DIC, heparin has been recommended for treatment Additional supportive care recommendations for patients with yellow fever include the following: A nasogastric or orogastric tube may be required to provide nutritional support Patients with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Prevention (...) ). Patient education Recommend yellow fever vaccination for international travelers going to endemic regions. Current information, including new outbreaks and information for travelers, can be obtained online from the and the . Previous Next: Etiology Yellow fever virus is a positive-sense, single-stranded, ribonucleic acid (RNA) ̶ enveloped flavivirus with a diameter of about 50-60 nm. The virus is transmitted via the saliva of an infected mosquito. Local replication of the virus takes place in the skin

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

36. Yellow Fever (Diagnosis)

fresh frozen plasma to maintain prothrombin time at 25-30 seconds In patients with DIC, heparin has been recommended for treatment Additional supportive care recommendations for patients with yellow fever include the following: A nasogastric or orogastric tube may be required to provide nutritional support Patients with renal failure or refractory acidosis may require dialysis Salicylates should be avoided because of the increased risk of bleeding secondary to platelet dysfunction Prevention (...) ). Patient education Recommend yellow fever vaccination for international travelers going to endemic regions. Current information, including new outbreaks and information for travelers, can be obtained online from the and the . Previous Next: Etiology Yellow fever virus is a positive-sense, single-stranded, ribonucleic acid (RNA) ̶ enveloped flavivirus with a diameter of about 50-60 nm. The virus is transmitted via the saliva of an infected mosquito. Local replication of the virus takes place in the skin

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

37. Corns

compression s have black dots (thrombosed vessels) VII. Management Manage underlying foot deformities if present See See Correct over-pronation if present Keratin removal Physician or Podiatrist Paring with sterile blade (15 blade) Curettage of keratin core Home treatment Warm water soak followed by pumice stone Corn Plaster (felt pad with 40% salicylic acid) Avoid contact with normal skin Avoid in patients with Padding to reduce mechanical irritation Pads for hard corns Silicone toe sleeves (releases

2015 FP Notebook

38. Plantar Wart

for 15-30 minutes Apply or to lesion overnight Remove in morning and use a loofa pad Repeat as often as nightly s 40% ( ) Effective over the course of months Salicylic Acid 17% in flexible collodion ( ) Does not slip like plasters As effective as See also Canthacur PS (SEE ) Use after soaking feet in hot water 10-15 minutes Occlude with tape Remove after 48 hours Performed by dermatology in refractory cases Contraindicated in pregnancy Use caution on weight bearing plantar surfaces Risk of painful (...) (pared) Painless on lateral pressure Retain normal fingerprint lines (warts do not) Contrast with pinpoint blood vessels of Plantar Warts Foreign body reaction (sheering in sports) Epithioma cuniculatum (verrucous carcinoma) IX. Precautions No treatment needed if asymptomatic Avoid aggressive technique Surgical excision X. Management ral Topical treatments require 2-3 months for eradication Relieve pressure on wart area with pads Soak foot before application of salicylic acid Soak in warm water

2015 FP Notebook

39. Warts

commonly used. Which method is used depends on the location and severity of involvement. Salicylic acid is the most common topical agent used. SCA is available as a liquid or plaster or impregnated within tape. For example, 17% liquid SCA can be used on the fingers, and 40% plaster SCA can be used on the soles. Patients apply SCA to their warts at night and leave it on for 8 to 48 h depending on the site. Cantharidin can be used alone or in combination (1%) with SCA (30%) and podophyllum (5 (...) , even with treatment. Factors influencing recurrence appear to be related to the patient’s overall immune status as well as local factors. Patients subject to local trauma (eg, athletes, mechanics, butchers) may have recalcitrant and recurrent HPV infection. Genital HPV infection has malignant potential, but malignant transformation is rare in HPV-induced skin warts, except among immunosuppressed patients. Treatment Topical irritants (eg, salicylic acid , cantharidin , podophyllum resin

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

40. Calluses and Corns

, 40% salicylic acid plasters, 40% urea) can also be used, taking care to avoid applying the agents to normal skin. Normal skin may be protected by covering it with petrolatum before application of the keratolytic. Cushioning and foot biomechanics Cushioning and altering foot biomechanics can help prevent corns and help treat existing corns. Although difficult to eliminate, pressure on the affected surface should be reduced and redistributed. For foot lesions, soft, well-fitting shoes are important (...) (bleeding points) representing thrombosed capillaries. A corn, when pared, shows a sharply outlined yellowish to tan translucent core that interrupts the normal architecture of the papillary dermis. Treatment Manual removal Keratolytics Cushioning Altering foot biomechanics Sometimes expert foot care Manual removal A nail file, emery board, or pumice stone used immediately after bathing is often a practical way to manually remove hyperkeratotic tissue. Keratolytics (eg, 17% salicylic acid in collodion

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

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