How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

37 results for

Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View

Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 (...) Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Aka: Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View , Right Coronal Ultrasound View II. Indications III. Approach: Right Intercostal Oblique View (Right lower chest to RUQ) Transducer positioning Placement: Right lateral lower chest and upper Axis: Long Access with indicator at 12:00 May rotate indicator to oblique 10-11:00 to reduce rib shadowing Direction: Energy perpendicular to lateral chest towards Landmarks

2018 FP Notebook

2. Left Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View

Conditions Left (same findings as on right) Additional measures (if time to evaluate incidental findings) can also be measured for in this view (normal <12-14 cm) Images IV. Approach: Left Coronal Ultrasound View Obtain view by tilting transducer inferiorly from right intercostal view (or dropping down 1-2 rib spaces) Transducer positioning Placement: 1-2 interspaces below the Left Intercostal Oblique Axis: Long axis with indicator at 12:00 Direction: Energy perpendicular to lateral Pan transducer (...) , 3rd Rock , Minneapolis, MN Alameda County Service Mateer (2012) Introduction to Trauma Video, GulfCoast , VL-95-T HCMC Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Left Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Radiology About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical

2018 FP Notebook

3. Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View

Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 (...) Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View Aka: Right Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View , Right Coronal Ultrasound View II. Indications III. Approach: Right Intercostal Oblique View (Right lower chest to RUQ) Transducer positioning Placement: Right lateral lower chest and upper Axis: Long Access with indicator at 12:00 May rotate indicator to oblique 10-11:00 to reduce rib shadowing Direction: Energy perpendicular to lateral chest towards Landmarks

2015 FP Notebook

4. Left Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View

Conditions Left (same findings as on right) Additional measures (if time to evaluate incidental findings) can also be measured for in this view (normal <12-14 cm) Images IV. Approach: Left Coronal Ultrasound View Obtain view by tilting transducer inferiorly from right intercostal view (or dropping down 1-2 rib spaces) Transducer positioning Placement: 1-2 interspaces below the Left Intercostal Oblique Axis: Long axis with indicator at 12:00 Direction: Energy perpendicular to lateral Pan transducer (...) , 3rd Rock , Minneapolis, MN Alameda County Service Mateer (2012) Introduction to Trauma Video, GulfCoast , VL-95-T HCMC Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Left Intercostal Oblique Ultrasound View." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Radiology About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical

2015 FP Notebook

5. Ultrasound in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care - A Guide to Training

, continuous wave Doppler and pulsed wave Doppler where appropriate 13 Demonstration of the understanding of the longitudinal (long axis) and transverse (short axis) planes of view 14 Demonstration of understanding of the term ‘in-plane’ approach by placing needle under the long axis of the ultrasound probe 15 Demonstration of understanding of the term ‘out-of-plane’ approach by placing the needle under middle of the probe at right angles to the long axis of the probe 16 Precise control of the probe (...) of diaphragmatic function Ultrasound guided pleural and lung biopsy Ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy and cricthyroidotomy Identification of the cricoid cartilage and extrathoracic tracheal rings Knowledge of the appearance of normal thyroid versus goitre and Doppler assessment of vascularity Anatomy Level 1 anatomy Detailed knowledge of relevant sectional anatomy Right and left hemidiaphragm Chest wall layers Ribs and intercostal spaces Surface anatomy of pleural reflections Heart Liver, spleen

2012 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

6. Gallbladder Ultrasound

obliquely to position the gallbladder in long axis Landmarks: Short Axis (transverse) Common bile duct (faint narrow line normally) in long axis (immediately below common bile duct) in long axis Inferior vena cava (~1 cm inferior to ) in cross-section Images RUQ/GB Long Axis RUQ/GB Long Axis - Intercostal RUQ/GB Short Axis Gallbladder localization Anterior Long axis or longitudinal approach Start with probe indicator at 12:00 with energy directed towards patient's right Sweep from midline to right (...) probe with best penetration and best visualizes common bile duct Phased-array probe (cardiac probe) Indicated if only view is lateral intercostal (due to overlying gas, patient position) See (part of ) Precautions Scan gallbladder in both axes (short and long axis) Scan through a series of planes (serial cuts) in each axis s Visualize suspected movement in various patient positions (decubitus, supine, prone) Carefully evaluate gallbladder neck (easily missed s, especially while supine) Landmarks

2018 FP Notebook

7. Ultrasound Guided Subcostal Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Paravertebral Block in the Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Ultrasound Guided Subcostal Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Paravertebral Block in the Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Ultrasound Guided Subcostal Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Paravertebral Block in the Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum (...) related topics: resources: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: USG guided Subcostal TAP block after preparing the skin, ultrasound probe was placed obliquely on the upper abdominal wall along the subcostal margin near the midline. the rectus abdominis muscles, transversus abdominis muscles and the fascial plane (TAP) between rectus abdominis and transversus abdominis muscles were identified. after identification, the block needle was introduced anteriorly

2015 Clinical Trials

8. Gallbladder Ultrasound

obliquely to position the gallbladder in long axis Landmarks: Short Axis (transverse) Common bile duct (faint narrow line normally) in long axis (immediately below common bile duct) in long axis Inferior vena cava (~1 cm inferior to ) in cross-section Images RUQ/GB Long Axis RUQ/GB Long Axis - Intercostal RUQ/GB Short Axis Gallbladder localization Anterior Long axis or longitudinal approach Start with probe indicator at 12:00 with energy directed towards patient's right Sweep from midline to right (...) probe with best penetration and best visualizes common bile duct Phased-array probe (cardiac probe) Indicated if only view is lateral intercostal (due to overlying gas, patient position) See (part of ) Precautions Scan gallbladder in both axes (short and long axis) Scan through a series of planes (serial cuts) in each axis s Visualize suspected movement in various patient positions (decubitus, supine, prone) Carefully evaluate gallbladder neck (easily missed s, especially while supine) Landmarks

2015 FP Notebook

9. Imaging Guidelines

concern for pediatric and pregnant patient populations. Close cooperation with the radiologist for proper technique adjustment is encouraged. Expert consensus currently does not specify a definitive lifetime risk for malignancy, though it is likely to be exceedingly small. 7,8 Providers need to understand this issue and balance the diminutive risk of exposure against the risk from potential missed or delayed diagnosis. Bedside ultrasound is a portable non- ionizing imaging modality with limited

2018 American College of Surgeons

10. Thoracic Aorta Interventional Planning and Follow-up

to avoid errors based on aortic obliquity; such measurements are easily obtained with modern postprocessing software [40]. More advanced postprocessing techniques such as 3-D virtual angioscopy, which affords a virtual endoluminal view, have shown utility in the surgical planning period [41]. Because thoracic aorta pathology often extends to involve the abdominal aorta, imaging of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is standard in evaluation of vascular pathology. CTA can also identify higher-risk features (...) ]. In certain patient groups, including variant anatomy such as aberrant right subclavian artery with aneurysmal degeneration of the vessel origin, hybrid open and endovascular procedures are performed wherein affected visceral branch vessels are surgically revascularized with concomitant or staged endovascular exclusion of the primary aortic pathology [7-9]. Thoracic aortic aneurysms are defined as permanent dilation of the thoracic aorta by more than 2 SDs over the mean. Based on population studies

2017 American College of Radiology

11. Guidelines for Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

to approximate with laparoscopic techniques, and should therefore be considered for an open component separation technique. References for Special Considerations: [9-11, 16, 18, 20, 27, 31-40] C. Diagnosis Guideline 4: While most ventral hernias are easily diagnosed based on clinical exam, a preoperative abdominal CT scan or ultrasound may be considered for select patients with suspected ventral hernias to confirm the diagnosis or to aid the surgeon with preoperative planning. (Moderate quality, strong (...) recommendation) Diagnosis of a ventral hernia is typically made during the history and physical examination. Imaging studies including ultrasound, provocative ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) with and/or without Valsalva, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also be used for diagnosis. Imaging studies may be helpful to assess the anatomic details of a ventral hernia, augmenting the physical examination, especially when a hernia cannot be reduced, and therefore the defect cannot be palpated

2016 Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

12. Aortic Diseases

diseases. The most important TOE views of the ascending aorta, aortic root, and aortic valve are the high TOE long-axis (at 120–1508) and short-axis (at 30– 608). 68 Owing to interposition of the right bronchus and trachea, a shortsegmentofthedistalascendingaorta,justbeforetheinnomin- ate artery,remains invisible (a ‘blind spot’). Images of the ascending aortaoftencontainartefactsduetoreverberationsfromtheposter- ior wall of the ascending aorta or the posterior wall of the right pulmonary artery (...) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2880 4.1 Clinicalexamination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2880 4.2 Laboratorytesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2880 4.3 Imaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2880 4.3.1 ChestX-ray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2880 4.3.2 Ultrasound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2881 4.3.2.1 Transthoracicechocardiography . . . . . . . . . . .2881 4.3.2.2 Transoesophagealechocardiography

2014 European Society of Cardiology

13. Congenital Heart Disease in the Older Adult

for surgery. Symptomatic documented ischemia or ventricular arrhythmia is an indication for surgical repair. A slit-like coronary ostium, an acutely oblique proximal coronary course (particularly with a high takeoff as occurs with the anomalous right coronary artery), and a longer segment running within the arterial wall (“intramural”) are all high-risk features. Additionally, ventricular arrhythmia elicited on exercise testing, unexplained syncope, or a dominant anomalous vessel should prompt further (...) evaluation and discussion. The single coronary ostium, although less common, also is a concern for SCD risk. Identification and assessment of anomalous coronary arteries can be achieved with multiple imaging modalities. Echocardiography frequently has excellent resolution in children and young adults but may be less sensitive in older adults. The right coronary artery is generally harder to image than the left, although visualization in the parasternal long-axis view next to the aorta may be helpful

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 American Heart Association

14. An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain - Part 2 - Guidance and Recommendations

assessment of methodological quality, poor writing, and ambiguous presentation, all of which essentially project a view that these are not applicable to individual patients or are too restrictive with a reductions in clinician autonomy and that overzealous or inappropriate recommendations are not based on evidence. To avoid these factors, ASIPP has followed the guidance for the development of trustwor- thy guidelines with the 8 standards of IOM (1). ? Establishing transparency ? Management of conflict

2013 American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians

15. FAST Exam

down to 100 cc free fluid (200 cc on average) Free fluid in varies from 50-80% Free Fluid in Blunt Stable Patient : 22% Unstable Patient : 28% when CT showed free fluid: 35% V. Preparation: Ultrasound Transducer selection Low frequency probe (deeper penetration): 3-5 MHz Curved Linear Probe Transducer indicator positioning is based on the patient's body as a clock face Head: 12:00 Left hand: 3:00 Feet: 6:00 Right hand: 9:00 Transducer orientation Use long access (12:00) positioning for most views (...) Exam , Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma , Limited Trauma Ultrasound , Focused Assessment with Ultrasonography for Trauma , Ultrasound of Abdomen for FAST Exam II. Background FAST Exam typically takes 2-4 minutes depending on level of experience May take as little as 10 seconds for each of the 7 views FAST Exam is an integral part of the In some centers, FAST Exam is performed in place of auscultation of lungs and heart as part of the evaluation is the highest yield portion of the FAST

2018 FP Notebook

16. Thoracic Aortic Disease: Guidelines For the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With

Aortic Valve and Associated Congenital Variants in Adults .e52 6.2. Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery .e53 6.3. Coarctation of the Aorta .e53 6.4. Right Aortic Arch .e53 7. In?ammatory Diseases Associated With Thoracic Aortic Disease .e53 7.1. Recommendations for Takayasu Arteritis and Giant Cell Arteritis .e53 7.2. Takayasu Arteritis .e54 7.3. Giant Cell Arteritis .e56 7.4. Behc ¸et Disease .e57 7.5. Ankylosing Spondylitis (Spondyloarthropathies) .e57 7.6. Infective Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms .e57 8

2010 American College of Cardiology

17. Therapeutic Injections for Pain Management (Treatment)

tissue vs bone), fluoroscopic visualization [lateral, oblique and AP planes] and using radiopaque contrast. Fluoroscopic localization requires an AP and lateral of the needle or one fluoroscopy view and contact with an identifiable bony landmark. Contacting bone during the procedure offers a unique opportunity to know needle tip position. Also, when the needle tip is resting on bone, it is unlikely to be in a dangerous venue, such as a blood vessel, neural tissues, or the intrathecal space. Injection (...) . The fluoroscopic imaging chain. The C-arm facilitates optimal positioning of the fluoroscope for the practitioner to get the most favorable view, (eg, posterior-anterior, oblique, and lateral views of the patient). The control panel allows the technician to manually adjust the quality of the image or leave it to the automatic brightness control (ABC). The quality of the image contrast depends on the balance between the tube voltage and current. A higher kVp setting increases the penetrability of the x-ray beam

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Therapeutic Injections for Pain Management (Overview)

tissue vs bone), fluoroscopic visualization [lateral, oblique and AP planes] and using radiopaque contrast. Fluoroscopic localization requires an AP and lateral of the needle or one fluoroscopy view and contact with an identifiable bony landmark. Contacting bone during the procedure offers a unique opportunity to know needle tip position. Also, when the needle tip is resting on bone, it is unlikely to be in a dangerous venue, such as a blood vessel, neural tissues, or the intrathecal space. Injection (...) . The fluoroscopic imaging chain. The C-arm facilitates optimal positioning of the fluoroscope for the practitioner to get the most favorable view, (eg, posterior-anterior, oblique, and lateral views of the patient). The control panel allows the technician to manually adjust the quality of the image or leave it to the automatic brightness control (ABC). The quality of the image contrast depends on the balance between the tube voltage and current. A higher kVp setting increases the penetrability of the x-ray beam

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Therapeutic Injections for Pain Management (Follow-up)

tissue vs bone), fluoroscopic visualization [lateral, oblique and AP planes] and using radiopaque contrast. Fluoroscopic localization requires an AP and lateral of the needle or one fluoroscopy view and contact with an identifiable bony landmark. Contacting bone during the procedure offers a unique opportunity to know needle tip position. Also, when the needle tip is resting on bone, it is unlikely to be in a dangerous venue, such as a blood vessel, neural tissues, or the intrathecal space. Injection (...) . The fluoroscopic imaging chain. The C-arm facilitates optimal positioning of the fluoroscope for the practitioner to get the most favorable view, (eg, posterior-anterior, oblique, and lateral views of the patient). The control panel allows the technician to manually adjust the quality of the image or leave it to the automatic brightness control (ABC). The quality of the image contrast depends on the balance between the tube voltage and current. A higher kVp setting increases the penetrability of the x-ray beam

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Pulmonary Atresia With Ventricular Septal Defect (Overview)

. Anteroposterior angiographic view in a 3.5-mm right modified Blalock–Taussig (BT) shunt in the previous patient at age 4 months. There is a patent BT shunt with mild proximal right upper lobe and right lower lobe branch stenoses. Courtesy of Dr Thomas Forbes. Lateral still image obtained from angiography in the previous patient at age 21 months. The infant underwent Rastelli operation with placement of a 15-mm pulmonary homograft. In this image, there is free homograft insufficiency without stenosis. Courtesy (...) of Dr Thomas Forbes. Lateral angiographic view in the previous patient at age 21 months. The infant underwent Rastelli operation with placement of a 15-mm pulmonary homograft. The presence of free homograft insufficiency with no stenosis is observed. Courtesy of Dr Thomas Forbes. Lateral still image obtained from angiography in a 7-year-old boy born with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (PA-VSD) who underwent Rastelli operation with a 17-mm right ventricle to pulmonary artery (RV-PA

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>