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Rhus Dermatitis

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1. Rhus Dermatitis

Rhus Dermatitis Rhus Dermatitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Rhus Dermatitis Rhus Dermatitis Aka: Rhus Dermatitis (...) , Poison Ivy , Poison Ivy Dermatitis , Poison Oak , Poison Sumac , Toxicodendron radicans , Rhus toxicodendron , Urushiol II. Epidemiology of complete Rhus immunity: 10-15% Rhus Allergy: Total of 75-85% of U.S. Adults Consistent Reaction: 50% of U.S. Adults Reaction to high doses: 25-35% of U.S. Adults III. Pathophysiology to Rhus Group of Plants Poison Oak (West of the Rocky Mountains) Poison Ivy (East of the Rocky Mountains) Poison Sumac (Swampy areas in Florida, Northeast) to Urushiol oil

2018 FP Notebook

2. Comparison of antibacterial activity and phenolic constituents of bark, lignum, leaves and fruit of Rhus verniciflua. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison of antibacterial activity and phenolic constituents of bark, lignum, leaves and fruit of Rhus verniciflua. Rhus verniciflua is commonly known as a lacquer tree in Korea. The bark of R. verniciflua has been used as an immunostimulator in traditional medicine, but also causes allergic dermatitis due to urushiol derivatives. For the development of active natural resources with less toxicity, the antibacterial activity of various parts of R. verniciflua such as bark, lignum, leaves

2018 PLoS ONE

3. British Association of Dermatologists? guidelines for the management of contact dermatitis

British Association of Dermatologists? guidelines for the management of contact dermatitis GUIDELINES BJD British Journal of Dermatology British Association of Dermatologists’ guidelines for the management of contact dermatitis 2017 G.A. Johnston, 1 L.S. Exton, 2 M.F. Mohd Mustapa, 2 J.A. Slack, 1 I.H. Coulson, 3 J.S.C. English 4 and J.F. Bourke 5 1 Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, In?rmary Square, Leicester LE1 5WW, U.K. 2 British Association (...) as an invited speaker for Crawford Healthcare Ltd (nonspeci?c) and as a co-author of British Occupational Health Research Foundation guidelines on occupa- tional dermatitis (speci?c). I.H.C. has acted as an invited speaker for Stiefel (speci?c). J.S.C.E. has acted as an invited speaker for Stiefel (speci?c). This is an updated guideline prepared for the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) Clinical Standards Unit, which includes the Therapy & Guidelines Subcommittee (T&G). Members of the Clinical

2017 British Association of Dermatologists

4. Extract of Rhus verniciflua Bark Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Extract of Rhus verniciflua Bark Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis. Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RV) has traditionally been used as a food supplement and a traditional herbal medicine for centuries in Korea. Recent studies suggest that RV has potent antioxidative, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of RV from mice sensitized with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) and activated macrophages were investigated (...) . The results showed that RV reduced ear swelling and hyperplasia of ear tissue as well as an increase in vascular permeability, which are characteristics of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) with evident histomorphological changes in epidermis and dermis. Decreased numbers of infiltrated mast cells were seen in RV extract treated group, using toluidine blue staining. RV extract significantly regulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at the translational level in activated

2013 Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (eCAM)

5. Rhus Dermatitis

Rhus Dermatitis Rhus Dermatitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Rhus Dermatitis Rhus Dermatitis Aka: Rhus Dermatitis (...) , Poison Ivy , Poison Ivy Dermatitis , Poison Oak , Poison Sumac , Toxicodendron radicans , Rhus toxicodendron , Urushiol II. Epidemiology of complete Rhus immunity: 10-15% Rhus Allergy: Total of 75-85% of U.S. Adults Consistent Reaction: 50% of U.S. Adults Reaction to high doses: 25-35% of U.S. Adults III. Pathophysiology to Rhus Group of Plants Poison Oak (West of the Rocky Mountains) Poison Ivy (East of the Rocky Mountains) Poison Sumac (Swampy areas in Florida, Northeast) to Urushiol oil

2015 FP Notebook

6. TREATMENT OF OAK DERMATITIS CAUSED BY RHUS DIVERSILOBA Full Text available with Trip Pro

TREATMENT OF OAK DERMATITIS CAUSED BY RHUS DIVERSILOBA 18738721 2008 08 29 2008 11 20 0093-402X 20 5 1922 May California state journal of medicine Cal State J Med TREATMENT OF OAK DERMATITIS CAUSED BY RHUS DIVERSILOBA. 153-4 Alderson H E HE eng Journal Article United States Cal State J Med 0414327 0093-402X 1922 5 1 0 0 1922 5 1 0 1 1922 5 1 0 0 ppublish 18738721 PMC1517153

1922 California state journal of medicine

7. Prevention of Poison Ivy Dermatitis by the Intramuscular Injection of “Rholigen” (Rhus Tox. Oleo-antigen) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prevention of Poison Ivy Dermatitis by the Intramuscular Injection of “Rholigen” (Rhus Tox. Oleo-antigen) 20320665 2010 06 22 2010 06 22 0008-4409 37 1 1937 Jul Canadian Medical Association journal Can Med Assoc J Prevention of Poison Ivy Dermatitis by the Intramuscular Injection of "Rholigen" (Rhus Tox. Oleo-antigen). 18-23 Caulfeild A H AH eng Journal Article Canada Can Med Assoc J 0414110 0008-4409 2010 3 24 6 0 1937 7 1 0 0 1937 7 1 0 1 ppublish 20320665 PMC1562267

1937 Canadian Medical Association Journal

8. Rhus Dermatitis as a Public Health and Health Education Problem Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rhus Dermatitis as a Public Health and Health Education Problem 18016469 2008 01 14 2018 11 13 0002-9572 37 1 1947 Jan American journal of public health and the nation's health Am J Public Health Nations Health Rhus Dermatitis as a Public Health and Health Education Problem. 7-12 Turner C E CE eng Journal Article United States Am J Public Health Nations Health 1254075 0002-9572 1947 1 1 0 0 1947 1 1 0 1 1947 1 1 0 0 ppublish 18016469 PMC1623224 Science. 1946 Apr 19;103(2677):465-92 17832071

1947 American Journal of Public Health and the Nations Health

9. A Case of Acute Dermatitis Caused by Handling the Rhus Toxicodendron Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Case of Acute Dermatitis Caused by Handling the Rhus Toxicodendron 20758350 2011 03 29 2011 03 29 0007-1447 1 1992 1899 Mar 04 British medical journal Br Med J A Case of Acute Dermatitis Caused by Handling the Rhus Toxicodendron. 530 Nicholson F F eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1899 3 4 0 0 1899 3 4 0 1 ppublish 20758350 PMC2462264

1899 British medical journal

10. What is the best treatment for plant-induced contact dermatitis?

is best, because there have been no head-to-head comparisons of treatments for Rhus (plant-induced) contact dermatitis. That said, topical high-potency steroids slightly improve pruritus and the appearance of the rash (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, small cohort studies). Neither topical pimecrolimus (an immunomodulatory drug) nor jewelweed extract are helpful (SOR: B, 1 small randomized controlled trial [RCT]). Oral steroids improve symptoms in severe cases (SOR: C, expert opinion). URI (...) What is the best treatment for plant-induced contact dermatitis? What is the best treatment for plant-induced contact dermatitis? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics What is the best treatment for plant-induced contact dermatitis? View/ Open Date 2013-06 Format Metadata Abstract It's unclear which treatment

2013 Clinical Inquiries

11. Poison Ivy (Rhus Toxicodendron): A survey of the poison ivy problem in Canada and some independent observations on the value of zirconium products in prophylaxis and treatment Full Text available with Trip Pro

Poison Ivy (Rhus Toxicodendron): A survey of the poison ivy problem in Canada and some independent observations on the value of zirconium products in prophylaxis and treatment 13426931 2002 05 01 2018 12 01 0008-4409 76 10 1957 May 15 Canadian Medical Association journal Can Med Assoc J Poison ivy (Rhus toxicodendron); a survey of the poison ivy problem in Canada and some independent observations on the value of zirconium products in prophylaxis and treatment. 852-60 CASPERS A P AP eng Journal (...) Article Canada Can Med Assoc J 0414110 0008-4409 C6V6S92N3C Zirconium OM Canada Data Collection Dermatitis, Toxicodendron Humans Toxicodendron Zirconium 5732:25109 POISON IVY DERMATITIS 1957 5 15 1957 5 15 0 1 1957 5 15 0 0 ppublish 13426931 PMC1823950 J Allergy. 1951 Jan;22(1):31-46 14823814 U S Armed Forces Med J. 1950 May;1(5):562-6 15418688 J Lab Clin Med. 1951 Jun;37(6):909-13 14850821 N C Med J. 1952 Jan;13(1):40-2 14911019 Ann Allergy. 1951 Jul-Aug;9(4):481-6 14847432 Geriatrics. 1955 Jun;10(6

1957 Canadian Medical Association Journal

12. Contact Dermatitis (Overview)

require several hours to develop. Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis is a type IV (ie, delayed) hypersensitivity reaction that affects previously sensitized individuals only. A common example of allergic contact dermatitis is rhus dermatitis, the allergic reaction to plants such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. The 2 distinct phases in a type IV hypersensitivity reaction are the induction (ie, sensitization) phase and the elicitation phase. During the induction phase (...) environmental allergens appear to be the same in Europe and the United States. Allergens such as benzocaine, neomycin, and lanolin are common in all countries. However, each country has a small number of locally unique topical medications, which are a source of allergens. Rhus dermatitis is extremely common in the United States but virtually nonexistent in Europe. The level of sensitivity to a specific allergen in a population changes over time. Some allergens come and go, and the perceived incidence

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

13. Contact Dermatitis (Treatment)

the allergen and known cross-reactive agents. Topical steroid therapy is of no benefit in irritant contact dermatitis. Previous Next: Systemic Steroids Systemic steroids are the mainstay of therapy in acute episodes of severe extensive allergic contact dermatitis. Without therapy, an episode of rhus dermatitis may be expected to persist as long as 3-4 weeks. Early adequate use of prednisone can significantly shorten this course. The duration of prednisone therapy is generally 7-10 days, but severe episodes (...) area and bathing as soon as possible after exposure are effective methods to limit rhus dermatitis. The only places in the United States where poison ivy is not found are areas above 4000 ft elevation, Alaska, Hawaii, and some desert areas of California and Nevada. Poison ivy usually grows east of the Rocky Mountains and in Canada. Poison oak grows in the western United States, Canada, and Mexico (western poison oak), and in the southeastern states (eastern poison oaks). Poison sumac grows

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

14. Contact Dermatitis (Diagnosis)

require several hours to develop. Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis is a type IV (ie, delayed) hypersensitivity reaction that affects previously sensitized individuals only. A common example of allergic contact dermatitis is rhus dermatitis, the allergic reaction to plants such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. The 2 distinct phases in a type IV hypersensitivity reaction are the induction (ie, sensitization) phase and the elicitation phase. During the induction phase (...) environmental allergens appear to be the same in Europe and the United States. Allergens such as benzocaine, neomycin, and lanolin are common in all countries. However, each country has a small number of locally unique topical medications, which are a source of allergens. Rhus dermatitis is extremely common in the United States but virtually nonexistent in Europe. The level of sensitivity to a specific allergen in a population changes over time. Some allergens come and go, and the perceived incidence

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

15. Contact Dermatitis (Follow-up)

the allergen and known cross-reactive agents. Topical steroid therapy is of no benefit in irritant contact dermatitis. Previous Next: Systemic Steroids Systemic steroids are the mainstay of therapy in acute episodes of severe extensive allergic contact dermatitis. Without therapy, an episode of rhus dermatitis may be expected to persist as long as 3-4 weeks. Early adequate use of prednisone can significantly shorten this course. The duration of prednisone therapy is generally 7-10 days, but severe episodes (...) area and bathing as soon as possible after exposure are effective methods to limit rhus dermatitis. The only places in the United States where poison ivy is not found are areas above 4000 ft elevation, Alaska, Hawaii, and some desert areas of California and Nevada. Poison ivy usually grows east of the Rocky Mountains and in Canada. Poison oak grows in the western United States, Canada, and Mexico (western poison oak), and in the southeastern states (eastern poison oaks). Poison sumac grows

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

16. Guildlines for care of contact dermatitis

of oral prednisolone on patch test reactions to rhus antigen. Arch Dermatol 1973; 107:540–3. 42 Sjovall P, Christensen OB. Local and systemic effects of ultraviolet irradiation (UVB and UVA) on human allergic contact dermatitis. Acta Derm Venereol (Stockh) 1986; 66:290–4. 43 Spaner D, Dolovich J, Tarlo S et al. Hypersensitivity to natural latex. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1989; 83:1135–7. 44 Kelly KJ, Kurup V, Zacharisen M et al. Skin and serologic testing in the diagnosis of latex allergy. J Allergy Clin (...) Guildlines for care of contact dermatitis GUIDELINES BJD British Journal of Dermatology Guidelines for the management of contact dermatitis: an update J. Bourke, I. Coulson* and J. English Department of Dermatology, South In?rmary, Victoria Hospital, Cork, Ireland *Department of Dermatology, Burnley General Hospital, Burnley, U.K. Department of Dermatology, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham NG7 2UH, U.K. Correspondence John English. E-mail: john.english

2009 British Association of Dermatologists

17. Ingestion of Rhus chicken causing systemic contact dermatitis in a Korean patient. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ingestion of Rhus chicken causing systemic contact dermatitis in a Korean patient. Rhus chicken is a common traditional remedy used to cure gastrointestinal diseases and as a health food in Korea. Unfortunately, systemic contact dermatitis (SCD) due to the ingestion of Rhus occasionally occurs. In this study, the clinical and laboratory findings were reviewed and analysed for 30 Korean patients with SCD developing after ingestion of Rhus chicken. Summer was found to be the commonest period (...) for hospital visits because of this condition. The mean period of incubation for SCD, was 4 ± 1.5 days. The commonest skin features were generalized maculopapular eruptions. Of the 30 patients, 10 had a known history of allergy to Rhus chicken. Many of the patients developed neutrophilia and leucocytosis. All the patients responded well to standard treatments. The commonest reason for their ingestion of Rhus chicken was indigestion. We conclude that SCD often occurs in Koreans after ingestion of Rhus

2010 Clinical & Experimental Dermatology

18. Assessment of vesicular-bullous rash

of skin involvement. Vesicles Vesicles are circumscribed, fluid-filled epidermal elevations <1 cm in diameter that: Berger TG, James WD, Elston DM. Andrew's diseases of the skin, clinical dermatology, 10th edition. WB Saunders; 2008. Contain serous exudates or serum mixed with blood, or are seropurulent in character (vesicopustules) Are discrete, grouped (e.g., herpetic infection), irregularly distributed, or linear as in rhus dermatitis (e.g., poison ivy) Are short-lived, either breaking (...) of blisters) may be an early indicator of autoimmune blistering diseases (e.g., bullous pemphigoid and dermatitis herpetiformis). Classification Blisters occur at various depths of the epidermis or dermis and may be classified based on the depth of skin involved. A broad classification divides blisters into those arising within the epidermis (intraepidermal, which includes subcorneal) and those that develop below the epidermis (subepidermal, which includes the basement membrane zone). Differentials Herpes

2018 BMJ Best Practice

19. Polymerized Urushiol of the Commercially Available Rhus Product in Korea Full Text available with Trip Pro

Polymerized Urushiol of the Commercially Available Rhus Product in Korea Systemic contact dermatitis commonly occurs with the intake of rhus (boiled chicken with rhus) as a health food and a folk medicine to cure gastrointestinal diseases in Korea. Rhus companies insist they have the technology for rhus detoxification. However, the numbers of systemic allergic contact dermatitis patients, caused by rhus, have not decreased. The principle of present techniques for rhus detoxification (...) is the induction of the polymerization of urushiol, but polymerized urushiol may still have antigenicity, although to a diminished degree. The Korean Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) has a regulation to control urushiol use as a food. However, the laboratory method that KFDA uses for detection of rhus can only detect the urushiol monomer.We conducted experiments to detect polymerized urushiol in rhus products, which were considered not to include urushiol by the KFDA.Rhus product approved by the KFDA

2010 Annals of dermatology

20. Rash Week! Name That Rash #3

, 2014 June 20th, 2014 June 19th, 2014 June 13th, 2014 May 20th, 2014 March 25th, 2014 2 Comments Laura Snyder, MD March 29, 2018 at 7:02 AM I really thought this would be poison ivy (rhus) contact dermatitis. It can look almost identical. March 29, 2018 at 7:08 AM It absolutely could be rhus – but I happen to know that this patient also had fever and diarrhea Comments are closed. Archives Archives Links @PEMTweets on Twitter © 2012-19 PEMBlog | All Rights Reserved |

2018 PEM Blog

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