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Respiratory Distress in Children with Pneumonia

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1. Association of polymorphisms in genes of factors involved in regulation of splicing of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mRNA with acute respiratory distress syndrome in children with pneumonia (PubMed)

Association of polymorphisms in genes of factors involved in regulation of splicing of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mRNA with acute respiratory distress syndrome in children with pneumonia Previous work has demonstrated a strong association between lung injury in African American children with pneumonia and a polymorphic (TG)mTn region in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance (CFTR) involved in the generation of a nonfunctional CFTR protein lacking exon 9. A number (...) of splicing factors that regulate the inclusion/exclusion of exon 9 have been identified. The objective of this study was to determine whether genetic variants in these splicing factors were associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children with pneumonia.This is a prospective cohort genetic association study of lung injury in African American and non-Hispanic Caucasian children with community-acquired pneumonia evaluated in the emergency department or admitted to the hospital

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2016 Critical Care

2. Respiratory Distress in Children with Pneumonia

Respiratory Distress in Children with Pneumonia Respiratory Distress in Children with Pneumonia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Respiratory Distress in Children with Pneumonia Respiratory Distress in Children with Pneumonia Aka: Respiratory Distress in Children with Pneumonia , Pediatric Respiratory Distress in Pneumonia , Pneumonia Related Respiratory Distress in Children II. Indications severity evaluation in children Directs disposition (Inpatient, PICU) III. Signs: Respiratory Distress in Pneumonia See for age-related criteria Apnea Increased work of breathing Retractions Suprasternal retractions (neck

2018 FP Notebook

3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome Toxin Uses a Novel KELED Sequence for Retrograde Transport and Subsequent Cytotoxicity (PubMed)

cause of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among children and adults in the United States, synthesizes a 591-amino-acid ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating protein, designated community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) toxin. CARDS toxin alone is sufficient to induce and mimic major inflammatory and histopathological phenotypes associated with M. pneumoniae infection in rodents and primates. In order to elicit its ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating activities, CARDS toxin must (...) Mycoplasma pneumoniae Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome Toxin Uses a Novel KELED Sequence for Retrograde Transport and Subsequent Cytotoxicity Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that causes respiratory illnesses in humans, including pharyngitis, tracheobronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It has also been directly linked to reactive airway disease, asthma, and extrapulmonary pathologies. During its colonization, M. pneumoniae expresses a unique ADP

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2018 mBio

4. Mechanical Ventilation in Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Mechanical Ventilation in Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome AMERICANTHORACICSOCIETY DOCUMENTS AnOf?cialAmericanThoracicSociety/EuropeanSocietyofIntensive CareMedicine/SocietyofCriticalCareMedicineClinicalPractice Guideline:MechanicalVentilationinAdultPatientswithAcute RespiratoryDistressSyndrome Eddy Fan, Lorenzo Del Sorbo, Ewan C. Goligher, Carol L. Hodgson, Laveena Munshi, Allan J. Walkey, Neill K. J. Adhikari, Marcelo B. P. Amato, Richard Branson, Roy G. Brower, Niall D (...) , M5G 2N2 Canada. E-mail: eddy.fan@uhn.ca Am J Respir Crit Care Med Vol 195, Iss 9, pp 1253–1263, May 1, 2017 Copyright© 2017 by the American Thoracic Society DOI: 10.1164/rccm.201703-0548ST Internet address: www.atsjournals.org American Thoracic Society Documents 1253 Overview The purpose of this guideline is to analyze evidenceontheuseofventilatorystrategies and associated cointerventions in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and to provide treatment recommendations

2017 Society of Critical Care Medicine

5. Bedside lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of pneumonia in children

: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [children] presenting with suspected pneumonia), can [bedside lung ultrasound] be used to diagnose [pneumonia]? Clinical Scenario A 4 year-old child presents to your local ED with respiratory symptoms and fever. In order to confirm your suspicion of pneumonia, you plan to order a chest radiograph, but a quick look into the child's medical record shows he has already undergone several X-rays in the last few years for the evaluation of upper respiratory tract (...) presenting to the ED with fever and respiratory distress, of which 214 had pneumonia detected on either modality. Pneumonia diagnosis by LUS was compared to CR without gold-standard comparison. Prospective cohort study Number of positive LUS 207 Very high prevalence population. LUS performed by 3 pediatricians. Also, 101 did not undergo lateral chest radiograph and only a PA view was performed as recommended by the British Thoracic Society. Lack of gold standard confirmation of discordant cases. Number

2017 BestBETS

6. Clinical Profile and Predictors of Outcome of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a PICU: A Prospective Observational Study. (PubMed)

respiratory distress syndrome (as per Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference definition) from August 1, 2015, to November 2016.None.Out of 1,215 children admitted to PICU, 124 (11.4%) had pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fifty-six children (45.2%) died. Median age was 2.75 years (1.0-6.0 yr) and 66.9% were male. Most common primary etiologies were pneumonia, severe sepsis, and scrub typhus. Ninety-seven children (78.2%) were invasively ventilated. On multiple logistic regressions (...) Clinical Profile and Predictors of Outcome of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a PICU: A Prospective Observational Study. To study the clinical profile, predictors of mortality, and outcomes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.A prospective observational study.PICU, Advanced Pediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.All children (age > 1 mo to < 14 yr) admitted in PICU with a diagnosis of pediatric acute

2019 Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

7. Specific Viral Etiologies Are Associated With Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. (PubMed)

pneumonia subjects with and without viruses. Secondarily, we examined the association between specific viruses and outcomes.We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively enrolled pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome cohort. Subjects with pneumonia acute respiratory distress syndrome underwent testing of respiratory secretions for viruses and culture for bacteria and fungi and were stratified according to presence or absence of a virus.Tertiary care children's hospital.Children with acute (...) respiratory distress syndrome.None.Of 544 children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, 282 (52%) had pneumonia as their inciting etiology, of whom 212 were virus-positive. In 141 of 282 (50%) pneumonia acute respiratory distress syndrome cases, a virus was the sole pathogen identified. Virus-positive pneumonia had fewer organ failures but worse oxygenation, relative to virus-negative pneumonia, with no differences in antibiotic use, ventilator duration, or mortality. Subjects with respiratory

2019 Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

8. DETECTION OF RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV) AT BIRTH IN A NEWBORN WITH RESPIRATORY DISTRESS (PubMed)

DETECTION OF RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV) AT BIRTH IN A NEWBORN WITH RESPIRATORY DISTRESS Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common respiratory pathogen in infants and young children. From the nasopharyngeal or conjunctival mucosa of infected individuals, RSV spreads to the lower respiratory tract causing acute bronchiolitis and pneumonia after an incubation period of 4-6 days. In addition to its well-documented tropism for the airway epithelium, it has been shown previously (...) that RSV can also spread hematogenously and efficiently infect extrapulmonary tissues of human hosts. Furthermore, it has been shown in animal models that RSV can spread transplacentally from the respiratory tract of a pregnant mother to the lungs of the fetus. This report describes a documented case of neonatal RSV infection strongly suggestive of prenatal transmission of this infection in humans from an infected mother to her offspring.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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2017 Pediatric pulmonology

9. Pediatric trauma-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome: Incidence, risk factors, and outcomes. (PubMed)

Pediatric trauma-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome: Incidence, risk factors, and outcomes. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) results in significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric trauma victims. The objective of this study was to determine risk factors and outcomes specifically related to pediatric trauma-associated ARDS (PT-ARDS).A retrospective cohort (2007-2014) of children ≤18 years old from the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB (...) ) was used to analyze incidence, risk factors, and outcomes related to PT-ARDS.PT-ARDS was identified in 0.5% (2660/488,381) of the analysis cohort, with an associated mortality of 18.6% (494/2660). Mortality in patients with PT-ARDS most commonly occurred in the first week after injury. Risk factors associated with the development of PTARDS included nonaccidental trauma, near drowning, severe injury (AIS ≥ 3) to the head or chest, pneumonia, sepsis, thoracotomy, laparotomy, transfusion, and total

2018 Journal of Pediatric Surgery

10. Differences Between Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Multicenter Analysis. (PubMed)

distress syndrome and pulmonary pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome were sepsis (82.9%) and pneumonia (91.7%), respectively. Children with extrapulmonary pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome were older, had higher admission severity scores, and had a greater proportion of organ dysfunction compared with pulmonary pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome group. Patients in the extrapulmonary pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome group had higher mortality (48.8% vs 24.8 (...) multidisciplinary PICUs in Asia.Mechanically ventilated children meeting the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference criteria for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome between 2009 and 2015.None.Forty-one of 307 patients (13.4%) and 266 of 307 patients (86.6%) were classified into extrapulmonary pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome groups, respectively. The most common causes for extrapulmonary pediatric acute respiratory

2018 Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

11. The Association Between Inhaled Nitric Oxide Treatment and ICU Mortality and 28-Day Ventilator-Free Days in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. (PubMed)

acute respiratory distress syndrome.None.There were 499 children enrolled in this study with 143 (28.7%) receiving inhaled nitric oxide treatment. Children treated with inhaled nitric oxide were more likely to have a primary diagnosis of pneumonia (72% vs 54.8%; p < 0.001), had a higher initial oxygenation index (median 16.9 [interquartile range, 10.1-27.3] vs 8.5 [interquartile range, 5.8-12.2]; p < 0.001), and had a higher 72-hour maximal Vasoactive-Inotrope Score (median 15 [interquartile range (...) stratified by oxygenation response, inhaled nitric oxide treatment was not associated with mortality or 28-day ventilator-free days in children with a positive oxygenation response (all p > 0.2) CONCLUSIONS:: Treatment with inhaled nitric oxide in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome is not associated with improvement in either mortality or ventilator-free days and may be associated with harm. Further prospective trials are required to define the role of inhaled nitric oxide treatment

2018 Critical Care Medicine

12. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome From E-Cigarette Use. (PubMed)

Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome From E-Cigarette Use. Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use, or "vaping," is gaining widespread popularity as an alternative to conventional cigarettes among adolescents. Little is known of the health risks of e-cigarette use, especially in children and adolescents. We present a Case Report of a previously healthy 18-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea, cough, and pleuritic chest pain after e-cigarette use. She (...) developed respiratory failure with hypoxia and was intubated, and ultimately met diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome. Chest tubes were placed to drain worsening pleural effusions. Computed tomography of the chest revealed dependent opacities in both lung bases, superimposed smooth interlobular septal thickening, and pleural effusions. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed cellular debris and reactive mononuclear cells, and cell counts were remarkable for elevated mononuclear cells

2018 Pediatrics

13. Short-course versus long-course intravenous therapy with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months. (PubMed)

excluded children with signs and symptoms of very severe pneumonia (i.e. unable to drink or breast feed, vomiting, lethargic, unconscious, convulsing, central cyanosis, severe respiratory distress or clinically severe malnutrition). We also excluded children who had developed pneumonia during their hospital stay (i.e. with nosocomial infection). There was no restriction on the type of antibiotic used, the dose or the frequency of dosing.We used the standard methodological procedures expected (...) Short-course versus long-course intravenous therapy with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months. Pneumonia remains the single leading cause of childhood mortality, causing an estimated 1.3 million childhood deaths each year in children under the age of five years. The greater burden of disease occurs in low-income countries, where medical resources and hospital-based management are poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) current

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2015 Cochrane

14. Risk Stratification in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Multicenter Observational Study. (PubMed)

Risk Stratification in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Multicenter Observational Study. The Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference developed a pediatric specific definition for acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). In this definition, severity of lung disease is stratified into mild, moderate, and severe groups. We aim to describe the epidemiology of patients with PARDS across Asia and evaluate whether the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference risk (...) %), and 135 (36.2%) patients with mild, moderate, and severe PARDS, respectively. The most common risk factor for PARDS was pneumonia/lower respiratory tract infection (309 [82.8%]). Higher category of severity of PARDS was associated with lower ventilator-free days (22 [17-25], 16 [0-23], 6 [0-19]; p < 0.001 for mild, moderate, and severe, respectively) and PICU free days (19 [11-24], 15 [0-22], 5 [0-20]; p < 0.001 for mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Overall PICU mortality for PARDS was 113

2017 Critical Care Medicine

15. Early acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization and potential association with respiratory distress syndrome in preterm newborn infants. (PubMed)

Early acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization and potential association with respiratory distress syndrome in preterm newborn infants. Pneumocystis pneumonia is a well-recognized lung disease of premature and malnourished babies. Even though serologic studies have shown that children are exposed to Pneumocystis jirovecii early in life, the epidemiology of human P. jirovecii infection and the host-microorganism relationship in infancy remain poorly understood. The aim of the present (...) in 25.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.8%-33.7%) of newborns studied. A significant increase of respiratory distress syndrome in colonized group, even after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio, 2.7 [95% CI, 1.0-7.5]; P = .04), was observed. No differences were observed in other medical conditions between the 2 groups.Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization is frequent in preterm births and could be a risk factor to develop respiratory distress syndrome among preterm infants.© The Author 2017

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2017 Clinical Infectious Diseases

16. Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation(NIPPV) vs Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation(NIPPV) vs Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Respiratory Distress Syndrome Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation(NIPPV) vs Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Respiratory Distress Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have (...) reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation(NIPPV) vs Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Respiratory Distress Syndrome The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before

2017 Clinical Trials

17. Adenovirus pneumonia complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report. (PubMed)

Adenovirus pneumonia complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report. Severe adenovirus infection in children can manifest with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure, leading to the need for prolonged mechanical support in the form of either mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support. Early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) intervention for children with ARDS should be considered if selection criteria fulfill.We report on a 9 (...) was subsequently discharged after a hospital stay of 38 days. Post-ECMO and adenovirus sequelae were followed in our outpatient department.Adenovirus pneumonia in children can manifest with severe pulmonary morbidity and respiratory failure. The unique lung recruitment by HFOV can be a useful therapeutic option for severe ARDS patients when combined with sufficient lung rest provided by ECMO.

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2015 Medicine

18. Respiratory compromise in children presenting to an urban emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Tanzania: a descriptive cohort study. (PubMed)

Respiratory compromise in children presenting to an urban emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Tanzania: a descriptive cohort study. Respiratory compromise is the leading cause of cardiac arrest and death among paediatric patients. Emergency medicine is a new field in low-income countries (LICs); the presentation, treatment and outcomes of paediatric patients with respiratory compromise is not well studied. We describe the clinical epidemiology, management and outcomes of paediatric (...) patients with respiratory compromise presenting to the first full-capacity Emergency Department in Tanzania.This was a prospective cohort study of paediatric patients (< 18 years) with respiratory compromise (respiratory distress, respiratory failure or respiratory arrest) presenting to the Emergency Medicine Department of Muhimibili National Hospital (EMD-MNH) in Dar es Salaam, from July-November 2017. A standardized case report form was used to record demographics, presenting clinical characteristics

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2019 BMC Emergency Medicine

19. Burden of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease and Mortality Risk Factors in Argentina: 18 Years Active Surveillance in a Children´s Hospital. (PubMed)

with months of lowest average temperature. RSV cases show a case fatality rate of 1.7% (82/4687). Fatal cases had a higher proportion of: prematurity (p<0.01), perinatal respiratory history (p<0.01), malnourishment (p<0.01), congenital heart disease (p<0.01), chronic neurological disease (p<0.01) and pneumonia at clinical presentation (p=0.014). No significant difference between genders was observed. Most deaths occurred among children who had complications: respiratory distress (80.5%), nosocomial (...) Burden of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease and Mortality Risk Factors in Argentina: 18 Years Active Surveillance in a Children´s Hospital. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in children. We aimed to describe the clinical-epidemiological pattern and risk factors for mortality associated with RSV infection.A prospective, cross-sectional study of ALRI in children admitted to the Children's Hospital among 2000-2017. Viral diagnosis

2019 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

20. NHFOV vs. NCPAP as a Primary Treatment to Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome(NRDS)

NHFOV vs. NCPAP as a Primary Treatment to Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome(NRDS) NHFOV vs. NCPAP as a Primary Treatment to Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome(NRDS) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies (...) before adding more. NHFOV vs. NCPAP as a Primary Treatment to Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome(NRDS) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03099694 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : April 4

2016 Clinical Trials

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