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Relaxation Technique

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6481. The effects of relaxation response meditation on the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome: results of a controlled treatment study. (Abstract)

The effects of relaxation response meditation on the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome: results of a controlled treatment study. In this study, Herbert Benson's (1975) Relaxation Response Meditation program was tested as a possible treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Participants were 16 adults who were matched into pairs based on presence of Axis I disorder, primary IBS symptoms and demographic features and randomized to either a six week meditation condition or a six week wait (...) list symptom monitoring condition. Thirteen participants completed treatment and follow-up. All subjects assigned to the Wait List were subsequently treated. Patients in the treatment condition were taught the meditation technique and asked to practice it twice a day for 15 minutes. Composite Primary IBS Symptom Reduction (CPSR) scores were calculated for each patient from end of baseline to two weeks post-treatment (or to post wait list). One tailed independent sample t-tests revealed

2001 Behaviour research and therapy Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6482. Functional relaxation as a somatopsychotherapeutic intervention: a prospective controlled study. (Abstract)

will report less pain than before they learned this technique.Randomized, prospective, single-blind, controlled trial. Standardized elements of functional relaxation were compared to a placebo-relaxation technique, a simple isotomic exercise of the hand.Primary care, ambulatory private practice.Twelve matched pairs were chosen according to age, sex, and initial pain intensity. This poststratification was performed on patients, who kept a complete pain diary covering 60 days before and 60 days after (...) Functional relaxation as a somatopsychotherapeutic intervention: a prospective controlled study. Functional relaxation is based on concentration on body perception while moving the joints of the skeleton smoothly and simultaneously breathing out. Case reports have shown that patients with headaches can profit from functional relaxation.To examine whether patients with chronic tension headaches (International Headache Society diagnosis) who use functional relaxation as a complementary treatment

2000 Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6483. Sensory stimulation (snoezelen) versus relaxation: a potential strategy for the management of chronic pain. (Abstract)

Sensory stimulation (snoezelen) versus relaxation: a potential strategy for the management of chronic pain. The sensory environment (Snoezelen) has been advocated by those working in the field of learning disabilities and mental health as a strategy to induce relaxation. The purpose of the current study was to explore this potential within the field of pain management where the use of relaxation techniques is often employed as a strategy for the management of chronic pain. Thus the current (...) study was designed in order to determine the use of the sensory environment compared against a traditional relaxation programme used within a District General hospital pain clinic.Seventy three patients were randomly allocated into either a control or experimental group. Data collection involved the administration of questionnaires, which were selected in order to reflect the multidimensional nature of the chronic pain experience. Hence measures included: pain intensity, pain quality, anxiety

2000 Disability and rehabilitation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6484. Relaxation and imagery for anxiety and depression control in community patients with advanced cancer. (Abstract)

relaxation training, (2) guided imagery training, (3) both of these treatments, and (4) control group. Subjects were tested before and after learning muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques for anxiety, depression, and quality of life using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale and the Functional Living Index-Cancer scale. There was no significant improvement for anxiety; however, significant positive changes occurred for depression and quality of life. (...) Relaxation and imagery for anxiety and depression control in community patients with advanced cancer. A community-based nursing study was conducted in Sydney, Australia, to compare the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on anxiety, depression, and quality of life in people with advanced cancer. In this study, 56 people with advanced cancer who were experiencing anxiety and depression were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment conditions: (1) progressive muscle

2002 Cancer nursing Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6485. The impact of foot massage and guided relaxation following cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

relaxation to improve psychological wellbeing. Both interventions were well received by the subjects.These interventions appear to be effective, noninvasive techniques for promoting psychological wellbeing in this patient group. Further investigation is indicated. (...) The impact of foot massage and guided relaxation following cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial. Because of the widely presumed association between heart disease and psychological wellbeing, the use of so-called 'complementary' therapies as adjuncts to conventional treatment modalities have been the subject of considerable debate. The present study arose from an attempt to identify a safe and effective therapeutic intervention to promote wellbe ing, which could be practicably

2002 Journal of advanced nursing Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6486. The effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation training in managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Chinese breast cancer patients: a randomised controlled trial. (Abstract)

The effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation training in managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Chinese breast cancer patients: a randomised controlled trial. This study was a randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation training (PMRT) in the clinical management of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting as an adjuvant intervention to accompany pharmacological antiemetic treatment (metoclopramide and dexamethasone i.v (...) .). Seventy-one chemotherapy-naive breast cancer patients of an outpatient oncology unit of a university hospital in Hong Kong participated, with 38 subjects randomised to the experimental group and 33 to the control group. The intervention included the use of PMRT 1 h before chemotherapy was administered and daily thereafter for another 5 days (for a total of six PMRT sessions). Each session lasted for 25 min and was followed by 5 min of imagery techniques. The instruments used for data collection

2002 Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6487. A pilot study of the use of progressive muscle relaxation training in the management of post-chemotherapy nausea and vomiting. (Abstract)

A pilot study of the use of progressive muscle relaxation training in the management of post-chemotherapy nausea and vomiting. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the effectiveness of using progressive muscle relaxation training (PMRT) in the management of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting in Chinese breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as well as feasibility issues for a larger study. Eight patients were randomly assigned to receive either oral anti (...) . The duration and intensity of vomiting were also lower in the experimental group. Delayed nausea and vomiting was observed in both groups. Despite the small sample size, the study showed that PMRT is an effective adjuvant method to decrease nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy patients. This has implications for nursing practice, as it is a low-cost and easy-to-leam technique that can be incorporated in the care planning of patients receiving chemotherapy.

2000 European journal of cancer care Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6488. Propofol or sevoflurane anesthesia without muscle relaxants allow the early extubation of myasthenic patients. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Propofol or sevoflurane anesthesia without muscle relaxants allow the early extubation of myasthenic patients. To compare two non-muscle relaxant anesthetic techniques in myasthenic patients undergoing trans-sternal thymectomy, evaluating the intra- and postoperative conditions including the early extubation in the operating room.Sixty-eight consecutive myasthenic patients undergoing trans-sternal thymectomy were prospectively randomized in two groups: propofol and sevoflurane. In both groups (...) patients. We did not observe any other significant differences between the two groups studied.Our data show that these two anesthetic techniques allow the early extubation of myasthenic patients in the operating room.

2003 Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d'anesthesie Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6489. Efficacy of IV Buscopan as a muscle relaxant in CT colonography. (Abstract)

Efficacy of IV Buscopan as a muscle relaxant in CT colonography. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of IV Buscopan as a muscle relaxant in CT colonography in terms of colonic distension and polyp detection, and to determine its particular efficacy in patients with diverticular disease. Seventy-three consecutive patients were randomised to receive IV Buscopan or no muscle relaxant prior to CT colonography. CT colonography was performed using a Siemens Somatom 4-detector multislice (...) to supine scanning was found to be the most useful technique for maximising colonic distension. Intravenous Buscopan at CT colonography does not improve the overall adequacy of colonic distension nor the accuracy of polyp detection. In patients with sigmoid diverticular disease IV Buscopan improves distension of more proximal colonic segments and may be useful in selected cases, but our results do not support its routine use for CT colonography.

2003 European radiology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6490. Effects of biofeedback-aided relaxation on the psychological stress symptoms of college students. (Abstract)

Effects of biofeedback-aided relaxation on the psychological stress symptoms of college students. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Benson's relaxation technique (BRT) with Benson's technique augmented with GSR biofeedback (i.e., biofeedback-aided relaxation, BAR) on the psychological stress symptoms of well college students. Seventy-eight normotensive college students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: the BRT group, the BAR group, and a control group. The BRT (...) and BAR students were asked to practice their respective relaxation technique daily for an eight-week period. Pre- and postintervention, all subjects were administered a state-anxiety inventory and a profile-of-mood state (POMS) test. Posttest analysis indicated that the BAR group had significantly lower state anxiety and POMS than the BRT and control groups (p less than 0.05). It was evident from the results that BAR did augment BRT in lowering psychological stress symptoms. Part of the effectiveness

1984 Nursing research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6491. Reduced pupillary sensitivity to topical phenylephrine associated with the relaxation response. (Abstract)

Reduced pupillary sensitivity to topical phenylephrine associated with the relaxation response. Human pupillary dilatation after topical instillation of phenylephrine was assessed in a prospective, randomized, controlled experiment to measure alterations in alpha-end-organ responsivity after regular elicitation of the relaxation response. Baseline pupillometric measurements were taken in both experimental and control subjects. The experimental subjects then practiced daily a technique (...) that elicited the relaxation response while the control subjects sat quietly for comparable periods of time without eliciting the relaxation response. After four to six weeks, both groups returned to the laboratory for an assessment identical to that of the first visit. Comparison between visits revealed that the pupillary dilatation in the experimental group was significantly diminished (p less than .02) as compared to that of the control group. This observation is consistent with reduced end-organ

1986 Journal of human stress Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6492. Relaxation: its effect on the nutritional status and performance status of clients with cancer. (Abstract)

Relaxation: its effect on the nutritional status and performance status of clients with cancer. Relaxation was used to promote normal food consumption patterns among persons with cancer. As part of a larger study, 22 persons with cancer were randomly assigned to receive instruction and reinforcement in a relaxation technique to be used preprandially. The relaxation procedure included four components: (a) deep abdominal breathing, (b) tensing and relaxing of various body parts, (c) relaxation (...) by autosuggestion, and (d) voluntary image control. Twelve clients complied with relaxation instructions in part, and 10 did not. Among compliers, 75% experienced desirable weight change over a six-week period. Performance status, measured by the Karnofsky scale, improved for 33% and worsened for 17% over eight weeks. Research has shown relaxation to be an effective measure in relation to pain, hypertension, and other conditions. These preliminary results now suggest that relaxation may also be effective

1984 Journal of the American Dietetic Association Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6493. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation on subjectively reported disturbance due to hospital noise. (Abstract)

The effects of progressive muscular relaxation on subjectively reported disturbance due to hospital noise. Hospital noise has repeatedly been demonstrated to exceed levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency. Hospital noise from staff and machinery has been implicated in the etiologies of many behavioral disorders such as sleep deprivation, sensory overload, and altered comfort levels. Relaxation techniques have been shown to be effective in decreasing the aversiveness of many (...) situations. This study tested the effects of progressive muscular relaxation (PMR) on subjectively reported disturbance due to hospital noise. In addition, noise sensitivity as a personality attribute was correlated with disturbance due to hospital noise and efficacy of PMR. A sample of 100 acutely ill hospitalized patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group or control group. The experimental group was instructed in the Bernstein-Borkovec technique of PMR; the control group received a short

1988 Behavioral medicine (Washington, D.C.) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6494. Can general practitioners use training in relaxation and management of stress to reduce mild hypertension? Full Text available with Trip Pro

successfully apply this technique of training those with mild hypertension in relaxation and management of stress. (...) Can general practitioners use training in relaxation and management of stress to reduce mild hypertension? To see whether general practitioners could effectively carry out training in relaxation and management of stress to reduce mild hypertension a study was carried out with a subsample of phase 2 of the Medical Research Council's treatment of mild hypertension trial. In the main mild hypertension trial patients had been receiving either an active drug or placebo for six years. In phase 2

1988 British medical journal (Clinical research ed.) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6495. Daily relaxation modifies serum and salivary immunoglobulins and psychophysiologic symptom severity. (Abstract)

Daily relaxation modifies serum and salivary immunoglobulins and psychophysiologic symptom severity. This study investigated the effect of daily relaxation on concentrations of serum immunoglobulins A, G, and M and secretion rates of salivary immunoglobulin A (S-IgA). Twenty-four volunteers were randomly assigned to practice a relaxation technique daily for 3 weeks and 16 to a waiting list control condition. Blood and saliva samples were collected before and after a supervised 20-min relaxation (...) session at the beginning and end of the 3-week practice period. S-IgA secretion rate increased significantly (p less than .001) after 20 min of relaxation. A longer-term practice effect also occurred in that the increase in secretion rate in "before to after" relaxation samples was higher (p = .014) in subjects who had practiced relaxation once a day for 3 weeks than in waiting list control subjects practicing for the first time. Serum IgA (p less than .001), IgG (p less than .001), and igM (p less

1988 Biofeedback and self-regulation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6496. Feasibility and effectiveness of school-based relaxation in lowering blood pressure. (Abstract)

Feasibility and effectiveness of school-based relaxation in lowering blood pressure. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) is a broadly useful anxiety reduction technique that has been found to lower blood pressure (BP) in essential hypertension. The present investigation is the first to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of wide-scale PMR instruction as a public health promotion strategy aimed at adolescents. Students (N = 1,400) in Grades 9 and 10 at two large Baltimore City public high (...) , mastered the technique, and achieved reduced systolic BP at posttest relative to the untrained controls (n = 59). At follow-up 4 months later, group BP differences were not significant. Implications for use of PMR to promote cardiovascular health are discussed.

1987 Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6497. Comparison of trichloroethylene and enflurane as adjuncts to nitrous oxide and relaxant anaesthesia. (Abstract)

Comparison of trichloroethylene and enflurane as adjuncts to nitrous oxide and relaxant anaesthesia. Forty women who underwent gynaecological surgery were randomly allocated to receive trichloroethylene, enflurane, or enflurane plus fentanyl as adjuncts to nitrous oxide/relaxant anaesthesia with controlled ventilation. No serious cardiac dysrhythmias were seen in any group. Each patient was observed postoperatively for 4 hours by a nurse blind to the technique used, and questioned at 24 hours (...) by a similarly blinded anaesthetist. Recovery after trichloroethylene was not significantly prolonged although postoperative analgesia by visual analogue was better, opiate analgesia was required less frequently and there was less nausea and vomiting than in either of the enflurane groups. We argue for the continued use of trichloroethylene by this technique, because it costs one hundred times less than enflurane and because of the potential morbidity of the postoperative opiate dosage required after

1987 Anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6498. [Rapid sequence muscular relaxation: vecuronium versus succinylcholine]. (Abstract)

[Rapid sequence muscular relaxation: vecuronium versus succinylcholine]. Onset times and conditions of endotracheal intubation were compared in 340 patients. They were all classified ASA I or II and free from any condition which might interfere with the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of muscle relaxants. The patients were randomly assigned to 4 groups where different muscle relaxation techniques with vecuronium were used: "priming" group (n = 150, 10 micrograms.kg-1 followed by 100 (...) and 210 s respectively, whereas maximum muscle blockade was obtained in 97, 174, 314 and 74 s respectively. Intubation scoring showed that optimum conditions were obtained when muscle responses were almost fully abolished. These data are in disagreement with those reports on the priming technique where intubation is carried out 60 s after administration of the relaxing dose.

1989 Annales francaises d'anesthesie et de reanimation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6499. Muscle stretching as an alternative relaxation training procedure. (Abstract)

Muscle stretching as an alternative relaxation training procedure. The purpose of this program of research was to explore the use of muscle stretching procedures in relaxation training with a clinical population. In the first controlled study, stretching exercises for four muscle groups (obicularis occuli, sternocleidomastoid/trapezius, triceps/pectoralis major, and forearm/wrist flexors) were prepared. A group of people using these procedures (SR, N = 8) was compared to a group using (...) the Bernstein and Borkovec (1973) tense-release (TR; N = 8) techniques for those same muscle groups, as well as compared to an appropriate group of controls (WL; N = 8). Assessment of physiological (multi-site EMG) and subjective (emotions, muscle tension, and self-efficacy) responses showed that persons in the SR displayed less sadness, less self-reported muscle tension at four sites, and less EMG activity on the r.masseter than persons in the TR group. In the second study, 15 subjects were administered

1990 Journal of behavior therapy and experimental psychiatry Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6500. Hypnotic relaxation and the reduction of sleep onset insomnia. (Abstract)

Hypnotic relaxation and the reduction of sleep onset insomnia. In the present study, a hypnotic relaxation technique was compared to stimulus control and placebo conditions as a means of reducing sleep onset latency (SOL). Forty-five subjects (Ss) were matched on their baseline SOL as measured through sleep diaries. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: hypnotic relaxation; stimulus control; and placebo. These groups experienced four weekly sessions of 30-minutes duration (...) with demand effects being controlled through the use of counter-demand instructions. Data generated by the study suggested that the particular hypnotic relaxation treatment used was effective in helping Ss go to sleep more quickly. Neither stimulus control nor placebo groups recorded similar improvement.

1989 International journal of psychosomatics : official publication of the International Psychosomatics Institute Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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