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Relaxation Technique

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6421. Personal power imagery and relaxation techniques used in smoking cessation programs. (PubMed)

Personal power imagery and relaxation techniques used in smoking cessation programs. Theoretically-based interventions are necessary for enhancing the power of self-control behaviors in smokers attempting to quit smoking cigarettes. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of guided imagery and relaxation techniques as interventions for smoking cessation. The relationship of imagery and self-control was also examined.A convenience sample of 84 adult smokers participated in one (...) of three treatment conditions: power imagery (n = 28), relaxation imagery (n = 29), and "placebo" control (n = 27). Treatment group members were taught imagery during a six-session smoking cessation program, and the control group was provided imagery training upon study completion.Smoking quit rates were 67% for the power imagery group, 69% for the relaxation group, and 27% for the control group. At a three-month follow-up, the power imagery group had a continued abstinence rate of 52% (relapse rate

1993 American journal of health promotion : AJHP

6422. Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review. (PubMed)

Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review. This review aims to document the effectiveness of relaxation techniques, when used alone for the management of acute pain, after surgery and during procedures. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was undertaken. Seven studies involving 362 patients were eligible for this review. One hundred and fifty patients received active relaxation as the sole intervention. Reports were sought by searching MEDLINE (...) , psycLIT, CINAHL, and the Oxford Pain Relief Database. The outcome measures used were pain and psychological factors. A meta-analysis was not possible, due to lack of primary data. Three of the seven studies demonstrated significantly less pain sensation and or pain distress in those who had relaxation. Four studies did not detect any difference. There was some weak evidence to support the use of relaxation in acute pain. However, this was not conclusive and many of both the positive and the negative

1998 Journal of advanced nursing

6423. Anaesthetic techniques for surgical correction of fractured neck of femur. A comparative study of ketamine and relaxant anaesthesia in elderly women. (PubMed)

Anaesthetic techniques for surgical correction of fractured neck of femur. A comparative study of ketamine and relaxant anaesthesia in elderly women. Ketamine has been compared with 'relaxant' anaesthesia in operations for fractured neck of femur in elderly women. Ketamine was found to reduce early mortality principally by a reduction in thromboembolic complications, but at the expense of more unsatisfactory surgical results. It is suggested that the mortality after relaxant anaesthesia

1980 Anaesthesia

6424. Contribution of relaxation technique training to the rehabilitation of myocardial infarction patients. (PubMed)

Contribution of relaxation technique training to the rehabilitation of myocardial infarction patients. The usefulness of relaxation training (RT) in cardiac rehabilitation is assessed by comparing the changes before and after rehabilitation in two randomly divided groups, one with and the other without relaxation. The psychological effects of RT, in addition to the effects of exercise training, were studied. There is a substantial and positive result on well-being and on feelings of invalidity (...) . Psychological improvement, as a result of exercise only, is not found. The benefits of RT occur more in persons with coronary-prone behavior pattern (type A). In some persons anxiety increases during rehabilitation (about 28%), regardless of RT. There is an indication that relaxation may lead to an increase of functional complaints in a small number of persons, possibly due to sensitization to bodily experiences.

1983 Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics

6425. Efficacy of relaxation techniques in hypertensive patients. (PubMed)

Efficacy of relaxation techniques in hypertensive patients. We examined 117 outpatients (20- to 45-year-old men) with mild essential hypertension before treatment, after the main treatment course (6 weeks), and at 12-month follow-up. The patients were randomized into two major groups: (a) a treatment group that received autogenic training (23 patients), biofeedback (24 patients), or breathing-relaxation training (23 patients) and (b) a control group that consisted of 24 patients who did (...) not receive any intervention and 23 patients who were treated with a "psychological placebo." Clinical, psychological, and psychophysiological data from all patients who were offered relaxation therapy were analyzed. By the end of follow-up, and compared to the control group, the treatment group demonstrated a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressures, peripheral vascular resistance, and hypertensive response to emotional stress, and an improvement in psychological adaptation

1988 Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

6426. Nursing management of postoperative pain: use of relaxation techniques with female cholecystectomy patients. (PubMed)

Nursing management of postoperative pain: use of relaxation techniques with female cholecystectomy patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two different relaxation techniques in the management of postoperative pain. The sample consisted of 40 women between the ages of 21 and 65 years who were undergoing elective cholecystectomy. Using an experimental design, participants were randomly assigned to four groups: an experimental group who received a taped recording (...) of a rhythmic breathing exercise (RB); an experimental group who received a taped recording of Benson's Relaxation Technique (BRT); an attention-distraction control group (CA) who received a taped recording of a history of the hospital; and a standard control (CB) group who had only the routine perioperative care which all groups received. Data were collected on postoperative sensation and distress at five time points during the first 72 postoperative hours, number of doses of analgesic medication during

1987 Journal of advanced nursing

6427. The effect of a relaxation technique on coronary risk factors. (PubMed)

The effect of a relaxation technique on coronary risk factors. This study examined the effect of a relaxation technique on plasma lipids, weight, blood pressure, and blood glucose. Sixteen outpatient males were randomly assigned to control or experimental groups. The experimental group was taught a relaxation technique that they used throughout the study. The control group was started in a reading program. Subjects were followed by a nurse practitioner and dietitian for eight weeks. Results

1988 Behavioral medicine (Washington, D.C.)

6428. Differential effects of relaxation techniques on trait anxiety: a meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Differential effects of relaxation techniques on trait anxiety: a meta-analysis. Hand and computer searches located studies on the effects of relaxation techniques on trait anxiety. Effect sizes for the different treatments (e.g., Progressive Relaxation, EMG Biofeedback, various forms of meditation, etc.) were calculated. Most of the treatments produced similar effect sizes except that Transcendental Meditation had significantly larger effect size (p less than .005), and meditation

1990 Journal of clinical psychology

6429. Muscle relaxation techniques: a therapeutic tool for family physicians. (PubMed)

Muscle relaxation techniques: a therapeutic tool for family physicians. Muscle relaxation techniques are important adjunctive therapy for anxiety-related conditions. Family physicians can learn to teach the techniques so as to try helping anxious patients themselves rather than automatically referring them to a psychiatrist. The exercises are generally acceptable to patients, are easy to learn and do not require expensive equipment. They are beneficial in insomnia and tension headache, of some (...) value in chronic anxiety states and a useful adjunct in hypertension. In this paper the evidence supporting the value of muscle relaxation therapy is briefly reviewed, methods of teaching and of practising the techniques are described in detail, and answers to some of the questions and problems that may arise are presented.

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1984 Canadian Medical Association Journal

6430. Biofeedback, Relaxation Techniques and Attitudinal Changes in Adolescents with Migraines (PubMed)

Biofeedback, Relaxation Techniques and Attitudinal Changes in Adolescents with Migraines From 3.2% to 9% of school-age children suffer from migraine headaches. Many physicians are concerned that pharmacological treatment of migraines can have undesirable side-effects, as well as lead to drug dependence in adolescents. A number of review articles have shown that biofeedback, behaviour modification and relaxation exercises can significantly help migraine sufferers. This article describes

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1987 Canadian Family Physician

6431. Music assisted progressive muscle relaxation, progressive muscle relaxation, music listening, and silence: a comparison of relaxation techniques. (PubMed)

Music assisted progressive muscle relaxation, progressive muscle relaxation, music listening, and silence: a comparison of relaxation techniques. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of music assisted progressive muscle relaxation (M + PMR), progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), music listening, and silence/suggestion on measures of anxiety and perceived relaxation. The study also examined participant responses to a posttreatment questionnaire to identify relationships between (...) musical and nonmusical elements in relaxation techniques. Sixty university students participated in the study. Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to each treatment condition. Subjects were tested individually using the same relaxation script for M + PMR and PMR conditions. One-way analyses of covariance were computed to compare pre and posttest differences among groups. Results of the ANCOVA revealed no differences among groups for the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) or the Visual Analog

2000 Journal of music therapy

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