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Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood

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1. Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood

Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Recurrent Parotitis (...) of Childhood Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood Aka: Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood II. Epidemiology Limited to pre-pubertal children III. Symptoms Recurrent, episodic swelling and pain Prodromal symptoms Malaise IV. Signs tenderness and swelling Unilateral in most cases (but can be bilateral) V. Management Hydration massage Warm compresses to parotid region Lemon drops and other sialagogues Antibiotics (e.g. , ) Otolaryngology consult Sialendoscopy may be indicated VI. References Images: Related links

2018 FP Notebook

2. Sialendoscopic Approach in Management of Juvenile Recurrent Parotitis (Full text)

Sialendoscopic Approach in Management of Juvenile Recurrent Parotitis To assess the role of sialendoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic modality in juvenile recurrent parotitis. Juvenile recurrent parotitis (JRP) is the second most frequent salivary gland disease in childhood and is characterized by recurrent non suppurative and non obstructive parotid inflammation. These attacks influence the quality of life and can even lead to gland destruction, and there are no definitive treatment (...) to avoid them. Sialendoscopic dilatation is emerging as the new treatment modality in this aspect. retrospective study.Department of Otorhinolaryngology in tertiary care hospital. 17 cases of juvenile recurrent parotitis (i.e. children of age group 3-11 years presenting with complaints of recurrent parotid region swelling and pain, sometimes associated with fever) were included in the study during October 2012-September 2015. All cases underwent sialendoscopy under general anaesthesia. Diagnostic

2017 Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery PubMed

3. Treatment of Juvenile Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood: An Analysis of Effectiveness. (Full text)

Treatment of Juvenile Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood: An Analysis of Effectiveness. Juvenile recurrent parotitis (JRP) is characterized by recurrent painful swelling of the parotid gland that occurs in the pediatric population. Sialendoscopy with and without ductal corticosteroid infusion (DCI) has been found to be effective in the treatment of JRP and autoimmune parotitis.To determine the utility of instrumentation vs pharmacotherapy alone for juvenile recurrent parotitis.A retrospective (...) medical record review of pediatric patients undergoing DCI without sialendoscopy at a tertiary pediatric hospital was conducted. The medical records were reviewed to determine the frequency of parotitis events before and after treatment. A multiquestion telephone survey of patients and their parents who underwent the procedure was then conducted to determine patient satisfaction.Ductal corticosteroid infusion with hydrocortisone through catheter inserted in the parotid duct.Frequency of symptoms

2014 JAMA otolaryngology-- head & neck surgery PubMed

4. Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood

Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Recurrent Parotitis (...) of Childhood Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood Aka: Recurrent Parotitis of Childhood II. Epidemiology Limited to pre-pubertal children III. Symptoms Recurrent, episodic swelling and pain Prodromal symptoms Malaise IV. Signs tenderness and swelling Unilateral in most cases (but can be bilateral) V. Management Hydration massage Warm compresses to parotid region Lemon drops and other sialagogues Antibiotics (e.g. , ) Otolaryngology consult Sialendoscopy may be indicated VI. References Images: Related links

2015 FP Notebook

5. Sialendoscopy in juvenile recurrent parotitis: a review of the literature (Full text)

Sialendoscopy in juvenile recurrent parotitis: a review of the literature Juvenile recurrent parotitis (JRP) is the second most frequent salivary gland disease in childhood, defined as a recurrent non-suppurative and non-obstructive parotid inflammation. The recurring attacks actually represent the most dramatic and serious aspect of this pathology, since they significantly influence the quality of life, and there are no recognized therapies to avoid them. In recent years, there are reports

2013 Acta Otorhinolaryngologica Italica PubMed

6. Recurrent Parotitis in Children (Full text)

Recurrent Parotitis in Children 13058436 2003 05 01 2018 12 01 0003-9888 28 139 1953 Jun Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. Recurrent parotitis in children. 182-6 JONES H E HE eng Journal Article England Arch Dis Child 0372434 0003-9888 0 Penicillins OM Child Chronic Disease Humans Infant Massage therapeutic use Parotitis Penicillins therapeutic use 5324:29083:387:477:482 MASSAGE/therapeutic use PAROTITIS/in infant and child PENICILLIN/therapeutic use 1953 6 1 1953 6 1 0 1 1953

1953 Archives of Disease in Childhood PubMed

7. Parotitis

punctate parotitis (chronic autoimmune parotitis) Although acute bacterial parotitis is fairly well understood, chronic enlargement of the salivary glands with recurring infection has caused confusion for more than a century. Numerous terms found in the literature, such as Mikulicz disease, Sjögren syndrome, benign lymphoepithelial lesion of Godwin, chronic punctate sialectasis, and recurrent parotitis of childhood (as seen in the image below), are confusing to the physician. Sialography was commonly (...) used in the workup of parotid disease in the past, and this group demonstrates punctate sialectasis, which implies point like dilatations within the gland. Six-year-old girl with recurrent parotitis of childhood. Mikulicz disease Johann Mikulicz-Radecki (1850-1905), a professor of surgery in Breslau, Poland, trained under Theodore Billroth of Vienna. In 1888, he encountered a 42-year-old farmer who had experienced lachrymal gland swellings followed by enlargement of the submaxillary and parotid

2014 eMedicine Surgery

8. Childhood HIV Disease (Diagnosis)

in the United States but still exist in developing countries. Sexual abuse of children and high-risk behaviors in adolescents also contribute to youth HIV infection. A variety of signs and symptoms should alert the clinician to the possibility of HIV infection in a child. The presentations include recurrent bacterial infections, unrelenting fever, unrelenting diarrhea, unrelenting thrush, recurrent pneumonia, chronic parotitis, generalized lymphadenopathy, delay in development with failure to thrive (...) Childhood HIV Disease (Diagnosis) Pediatric HIV Infection: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTY1MDg2LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Pediatric HIV Infection

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Childhood HIV Disease (Overview)

in the United States but still exist in developing countries. Sexual abuse of children and high-risk behaviors in adolescents also contribute to youth HIV infection. A variety of signs and symptoms should alert the clinician to the possibility of HIV infection in a child. The presentations include recurrent bacterial infections, unrelenting fever, unrelenting diarrhea, unrelenting thrush, recurrent pneumonia, chronic parotitis, generalized lymphadenopathy, delay in development with failure to thrive (...) Childhood HIV Disease (Overview) Pediatric HIV Infection: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTY1MDg2LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Pediatric HIV Infection

2014 eMedicine.com

11. BSR guideline Management of Adults with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (Full text)

in the mouth with sore, ulcerated gums as a consequence of rubbing. Many patients suffer recurrent infections including parotitis, intraoral candidiasis and angular cheilitis. Dysarthria, dysphagia and dysgeusia (distorted sense of taste) are seen in established disease. The evidence surrounding periodontal disease in Sjögren’s is conflicting, with some studies suggesting an increased prevalence of periodontal disease [ ] but others not [ ]. Effective management of the dry mouth is important

2017 British Society for Rheumatology PubMed

12. CRACKCast E130 – Viruses

concepts: Recent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable childhood infections secondary to unvaccinated individuals and travel to areas where disease is still endemic demonstrate that these rare diseases are the rise! Look out for them! Herpes simplex encephalitis is a severe disease that is fatal if left untreated. Clinicians should suspect this diagnosis when evaluating severely ill patients for suspected meningitis or encephalitis, and promptly institute empirical therapy with IV acyclovir while awaiting (...) (of Childhood) Smallpox Polio Measles Mumps Rubella Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Influenza A and B Rabies Yellow fever Rota virus Varicella Zoster Viral illnesses presenting with VESICULAR rashes HSV 1 HSV 2 Varicella zoster virus Viruses associated with RESPIRATORY illness Influenza Coronavirus SARS CoV MERS Parainfluenza (4 types), Adenoviruses, Rhinoviruses Respiratory syncytial virus Echoviruses, Coxsackie Viruses Viral illnesses presenting with NONSPECIFIC febrile illness CMV EBV Enteroviruses : poliovirus

2017 CandiEM

13. Evaluation of the Neck Mass in Adults

indicates progression of disease, which requires timely management to prevent a more advanced cancer stage. Among patients with HNSCC who present with neck mass, diagnostic delay is common. Delays in diagnosis of 3 to 6 months have been reported, - which is particularly disappointing knowing that delays as short as 2 months are associated with worse functional outcomes, - lower quality of life, - cancer recurrence, and death. - Delay in diagnosis may result from patient delay or professional delay (...) . Open biopsy is suboptimal because it risks tumor seeding and local and regional tumor recurrence. , , Although we lack data on the frequency of open biopsy, comprehensive cancer centers report that patients are regularly referred for cancer care following inappropriate open neck biopsy. , Two large academic tertiary referral head and neck cancer centers reported 45 patients evaluated over a 14-year period and 94 patients evaluated for >13 consecutive years with HNSCC who had undergone open neck

2017 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

14. The use of vaccines in HIV-positive adults

vaccine The diphtheria vaccine is non-­-replicating and is made from cell-­-free purified toxin extracted from C. diphtheriae and converted into diphtheria toxoid. The vaccine is given to adults in combination with tetanus toxoid and inactivated polio vaccine (Td/IPV) in a preparation containing a lower dosage of diphtheria toxoid than preparations designed for use in childhood. The vaccine is given by parenteral administration. The diphtheria vaccine induces protective antitoxin levels in 95 (...) . There are no data to support laboratory testing to exclude a prior HPV exposure before vaccination. Whilst the vaccines are not expected to have therapeutic effects, vaccination of individuals pre-­- exposed to the vaccine types is safe, may boost immunity, and may prevent re-­-infection or reduce recurrences in people with established disease [47,48]. For those with incomplete vaccination, completion of the course is indicated with the appropriate vaccine type, although there are no strict contraindications

2015 British HIV Association

15. Spectrila - asparaginase

incidence has a bimodal distribution with a sharp peak among children aged 2 to 3 years (>90 per million per year), with rates decreasing to 30 per million by age 8 years (NCI at the NIH: Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment, March 2013). A second steady increase in the incidence of ALL begins at approximately 50 years of age, with a peak incidence of about 2 per 100,000. Overall, estimated incidence in the EU is 1.28 per 100,000 persons, corresponding to a total of approximately 5,600 new (...) a recurrence. All these protocols involve the use of L-asparaginase during induction and consolidation /intensification phases. The objective of asparaginase therapy is to deplete physiological asparagine so that it is unavailable to tumour cells. Historically, native E coli-derived asparaginase was used as the initial intervention. However, treatment-limiting immune response can occur. Once hypersensitivity is apparent, it is necessary to switch to a different asparaginase preparation. Therapy can

2016 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

16. AIUM Practice Parameter for the Performance of Ultrasound Examinations of the Head and Neck

/15 3:14 PM Page 11References 1. Angelli G, Fana G, Macanini L, Lacaita MG, Laforgia A. Echography in the study of sialolithiasis. Radiol Med Torino 1990; 79:220–223. 2. Williams MF . Sialolithiasis. Otolaryngol Clin North Am 1999; 32:819–834. 3. Yoshimura Y, Inone U, Odagana T. Sonographic evaluation of sialolithiasis. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1989; 47:907–912. 4. Nozaki H, Harasawa A, Hara H, Kohno A, Shigeta A. Ultrasonographic features of recurrent parotitis in childhood. Pediatr Radiol 1994; 24 (...) enlargement and tenderness consistent with inflammatory sialadenitis 1–4 ; • Suspected abscess formation; • Recurrent swelling suggesting Sjogren’s disorder 5,6 ; • Swelling with alimentation, suggestive of obstructing calculus; • Discrete solitary mass suggestive of a benign or malignant neoplasm 7–9 ; • Multiple masses, possibly consistent with cysts suggesting human immuno- deficiency virus 10–12 ; and • Anterior floor-of-the-mouth lesion, which may be solid or cystic, the latter suggestive of a simple

2013 American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

17. Management of suspected viral encephalitis in children (Full text)

are specific to childhood, but fortunately it is relatively rare. However doctors who treat acutely ill children should be aware of how to manage a child with suspected encephalitis as some of the individual causes of encephalitis will respond to specific treatments and delays in the diagnosis in these children can be devastating. Strictly speaking, inflammation of the brain parenchyma is a pathological diagnosis, however due to the practical limitations of this, surrogate clinical markers of inflammation (...) simplex virus type 1 Most commonly diagnosed sporadic encephalitis Herpes simplex virus type 2 Causes meningitis in adults (esp. recurrent); Meningoencephalitis occurs typically in the immunocompromised. Also causes a radiculitis. Varicella zoster virus Post-infective cerebellitis, or acute infective encephalitis or vasculopathy Epstein–Barr virus Encephalitis in the immunocompromised Cytomegalovirus Encephalitis in the immunocompromised; also retinitis or radiculitis; often neutrophilic CSF with low

2012 British Infection Association PubMed

19. Cancer and Rehabilitation (Overview)

are treated with modified radical mastectomy, preceded or followed by chemotherapy. Irradiation of the chest wall is often considered when the risk of chest-wall or nodal recurrence is high, when primary tumors are large or multicentric, or when 4 or more axillary nodes contain metastatic cancer. Systemic therapy (ie, chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy) is recommended for patients who present with metastatic disease or who have risk factors for metastases. Risk factors for metastatic cancer include age (...) , endurance, and general functional ability. Instruct the patient regarding ROM exercises, postoperative breathing, and initial mobility after surgery. Start shoulder and arm rehabilitation as soon as the surgical incision appears healed and recurrent seroma or infection is absent; remember the principles of wound healing. Early PT to the shoulder after axillary dissection does not increase the incidence of lymphedema. The development of seromas is most prevalent with extensive surgeries. Encourage

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Viral Infections of the Mouth (Diagnosis)

. The other forms of HHV can result in death. Herpes infections occasionally trigger erythema multiforme. Age Primary herpes infections typically occur during childhood or youth, although occasional cases are observed in older individuals. Recurrent HHV-1 infections typically occur throughout life and are particularly triggered by stress, illness, immune compromise, or other factors. Herpes zoster usually affects patients older than 40 years, and has similar triggers, although triggering conditions (...) Background HHV infections are common in the oral cavity. They may be primary or recurrent infections. Eight types of HHV have been linked with oral disease. These types have different disease patterns in their hosts. HHV-1, also known as herpes simplex virus (HSV)–1, causes primary herpetic gingivostomatitis, or oral herpes. In some hosts, it becomes latent and may periodically recur as a common cold sore. HHV-2, also known as HSV-2, causes genital herpes and occasionally causes oral disease

2014 eMedicine.com

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