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Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome

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1. Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood. (PubMed)

Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood. This is an update of the original Cochrane review, last published in 2009 (Huertas-Ceballos 2009). Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), including children with irritable bowel syndrome, is a common problem affecting between 4% and 25% of school-aged children. For the majority of such children, no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation. Many dietary inventions have been suggested to improve (...) or no treatment in children aged five to 18 years with RAP or an abdominal pain-related, functional gastrointestinal disorder, as defined by the Rome III criteria (Rasquin 2006).We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We grouped dietary interventions together by category for analysis. We contacted study authors to ask for missing information and clarification, when needed. We assessed the quality of the evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach.We included 19 RCTs, reported

2017 Cochrane

2. Abdominal Cocoon Syndrome: a Rare Cause for Recurrent Abdominal Pain. (PubMed)

Abdominal Cocoon Syndrome: a Rare Cause for Recurrent Abdominal Pain. Abdominal cocoon syndrome, or sclerosing peritonitis, is a rare condition characterized by encasement of small bowel loops by a thick fibrous scar. It most commonly presents as nonspecific vague chronic abdominal pain and weight loss, and is difficult to recognize clinically until the patient develops symptoms of bowel obstruction. We present a case of abdominal cocoon syndrome in a 65-year-old female and describe its

2017 Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

3. Psychological therapies (remotely delivered) for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. (PubMed)

participants since the previous review) that delivered treatment remotely; four studies investigated children with headache conditions, one study was with children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, one included children with sickle cell disease, one included children with irritable bowel syndrome, and three studies included children with different chronic pain conditions (i.e. headache, recurrent abdominal pain, musculoskeletal pain). The average age of children receiving treatment was 13.17 years.We (...) , for the management of chronic pain in children and adolescents.We searched four databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO) from inception to May 2018 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of remotely-delivered psychological interventions for children and adolescents with chronic pain. We searched for chronic pain conditions including, but not exclusive to, headache, recurrent abdominal pain, musculoskeletal pain, and neuropathic pain. We also searched online trial registries, reference sections

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2019 Cochrane

4. Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome

Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Recurrent (...) Abdominal Pain Syndrome Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome Aka: Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome , Functional Abdominal Pain in Children II. Epidemiology Ages 5 - 16 years (peaks at age 9 years) School age children: 10-15% Pre-teen and teenage children: 20% III. Pathophysiology with altered intestinal motility Hyperalgesia and altered sensory pathways IV. Causes Functional in most cases Postprandial fullness, early satiety, on 4 days per month for 2 months Not associated with Abdominal Two episodes in 6

2018 FP Notebook

5. Psychological therapies for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. (PubMed)

completing treatment (mean age 12.65 years, SD 2.21 years). Twenty-three studies addressed treatments for headache (including migraine); 10 for abdominal pain; two studies treated participants with either a primary diagnosis of abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome, two studies treated adolescents with fibromyalgia, two studies included adolescents with temporomandibular disorders, three were for the treatment of pain associated with sickle cell disease, and two studies treated adolescents (...) Psychological therapies for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. This is an update of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 1, 2003, and previously updated in 2009, 2012 and 2014. Chronic pain, defined as pain that recurs or persists for more than three months, is common in childhood. Chronic pain can affect nearly every aspect of daily life and is associated with disability, anxiety, and depressive symptoms.The aim of this review

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2018 Cochrane

6. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

=bestpractice.com The resulting discomfort may range from abdominal suprapubic tenderness to intense pain of the pelvic floor and dyspareunia. This organ-centric terminology places IC/BPS within the overall scope of chronic pelvic pain syndromes (CPPS), which also includes prostate, gynaecological, and bowel pain syndromes. European Association of Urology. Chronic pelvic pain. 2018 [internet publication]. https://uroweb.org/guideline/chronic-pelvic-pain/ Commonly, patients are treated for recurrent bacterial (...) Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Chronic, often debilitating clinical syndrome of urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain. Symptoms vary with bladder filling. Typified by periods of remission

2019 BMJ Best Practice

7. Slipping Rib Syndrome in a Female Adult with Longstanding Intractable Upper Abdominal Pain (PubMed)

Slipping Rib Syndrome in a Female Adult with Longstanding Intractable Upper Abdominal Pain Slipping rib syndrome is a rare cause of abdominal or lower chest pain that can remain undiagnosed for many years. Awareness among health care personnel of this rare but significant disorder is necessary for early recognition. Prompt treatment can avoid unnecessary testing, radiographic exposure, and years of debilitating pain. A 52-year-old female was evaluated for a 3-year history of recurrent abdominal (...) and lower chest pain. Pain was sharp, primarily located in the lower chest and subcostal region left more than right, waxing and waning, nonradiating, and aggravates with specific movements. She underwent frequent physical therapies, treated with multiple muscle relaxants and analgesics with minimal improvement. Imaging modalities including CT scan, MRI, and X-rays performed on multiple occasions failed to signify any underlying abnormality. Complete physical examination was unremarkable except

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2018 Case reports in medicine

8. Rapunzel syndrome: an infrequent cause of severe iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain presenting to the pediatric emergency department. (PubMed)

Rapunzel syndrome: an infrequent cause of severe iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain presenting to the pediatric emergency department. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and abdominal pain are commonly seen in a pediatric emergency department (8 and 18% incidence respectively in our center). They are manifestations of a wide variety of diseases ranging from benign to immediately life-threatening. Trichobezoar is an under-diagnosed entity that has to be considered in children and adolescents (...) , expecially female, suffering from trichotillomania (compulsion to pull hair) and trichophagy (compulsion to swallow hair). When undiagnosed, gastric bezoars may cause gastric ulceration, perforation, haemorrhage and obstruction.To underline the importance of including this pathology in the differential diagnosis of IDA and abdominal pain, we present the case of a 14 year-old girl with a huge trichobezoar which completely filled the stomach and extended into the small bowel. Since trichobezoar has

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2018 BMC Pediatrics

9. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

=bestpractice.com The resulting discomfort may range from abdominal suprapubic tenderness to intense pain of the pelvic floor and dyspareunia. This organ-centric terminology places IC/BPS within the overall scope of chronic pelvic pain syndromes (CPPS), which also includes prostate, gynaecological, and bowel pain syndromes. European Association of Urology. Chronic pelvic pain. 2018 [internet publication]. https://uroweb.org/guideline/chronic-pelvic-pain/ Commonly, patients are treated for recurrent bacterial (...) Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Chronic, often debilitating clinical syndrome of urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain. Symptoms vary with bladder filling. Typified by periods of remission

2018 BMJ Best Practice

10. Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. (PubMed)

Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. Between 4% and 25% of school-age children complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) of sufficient severity to interfere with daily activities. It is unclear whether the diagnosis includes children with different aetiologies for their pain. For the majority no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation. Although most children are likely managed (...) by reassurance and simple measures, a large range of interventions have been recommended.To determine the effectiveness of dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in school-age children.The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) 2006 (Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to Dec 2006), EMBASE (1980 to Dec 2006), CINAHL (1982 to Dec 2007), ERIC (1966 to Dec 2006), PsycINFO (1872 to Dec 2006), LILACS (1982 to Dec 2006), SIGLE (1980 to March 2005), and JICST (1985 to 06/2000) were searched . Where appropriate, search filters

2009 Cochrane

11. Randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in abdominal pain and bloating in those with predominant constipation. (PubMed)

Randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in abdominal pain and bloating in those with predominant constipation. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and/or discomfort. Probiotics have been reported to benefit IBS symptoms but the level of benefit remains quite unclear.This study was designed to assess the benefit (...) 8 weeks of the study.There was no overall benefit of S. cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms and wellbeing in the study population. Moreover, S. cerevisiae I-3856 was not statistically significant predictor of the responder status of the subjects (p > 0.05). Planned subgroup analyses showed significant effect in the IBS-C subjects: improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly higher in active group, compared to placebo, on abdominal pain/discomfort and bloating throughout the study

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2016 United European gastroenterology journal

12. Complex regional pain syndrome in adults. UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 (2nd edition)

Complex regional pain syndrome in adults. UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 (2nd edition) Complex regional pain syndrome in adults UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 2nd edition 2nd editionComplex regional pain syndrome in adults These guidelines were developed by a panel of experts with support from, representation and endorsement by the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Royal (...) , the Vascular Society, the Association of British Neurologists and the British Society of Clinical Neurophysiology. Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and their relatives contributed to the development process. Published with:ii © Royal College of Physicians 2018 The Royal College of Physicians The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) plays a leading role in the delivery of high-quality patient care by setting standards of medical practice and promoting clinical excellence. The RCP provides

2018 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

13. WITHDRAWN: Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. (PubMed)

WITHDRAWN: Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. 24532249 2014 10 08 2018 12 21 1469-493X 2 2014 Feb 17 The Cochrane database of systematic reviews Cochrane Database Syst Rev WITHDRAWN: Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. CD003017 10.1002/14651858.CD003017.pub3 Huertas-Ceballos Angela A AA Neonatal Unit, Women's Health, UCLH, Neonatal office (...) 2nd floor North, 250 Euston Road, London, UK, NW1 2PG. Logan Stuart S Bennett Cathy C Macarthur Colin C Martin Alice E AE eng Journal Article Meta-Analysis Review Systematic Review 2014 02 17 England Cochrane Database Syst Rev 100909747 1361-6137 0 Analgesics, Non-Narcotic 0 Plant Oils 0BY8440V3N Pizotyline 5QZO15J2Z8 Famotidine AV092KU4JH peppermint oil IM Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(1):CD003017 18254013 Abdominal Pain drug therapy Adolescent Analgesics, Non-Narcotic therapeutic use Child

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2014 Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)

14. Psychosocial interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. (PubMed)

Psychosocial interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. Between 4% and 25% of school-age children complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) of sufficient severity to interfere with daily activities. For the majority of such children, no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation. Although most children are managed by reassurance and simple measures, a large range of psychosocial interventions (...) including cognitive and behavioural treatments and family therapy have been recommended.To determine the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for recurrent abdominal pain or IBS in school-age children.The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) 2006 (Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to Dec 2006), EMBASE (1980 to Dec 2006), CINAHL (1982 to Dec 2006), ERIC (1966 to Dec 2006), PsycINFO (1872 to Dec 2006), LILACS (1982 to Dec 2006), SIGLE (1980 to March 2005), and JICST (1985 to 06/2000) were searched with appropriate

2008 Cochrane

15. Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. (PubMed)

Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. Between 4% and 25% of school-age children complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) of sufficient severity to interfere with daily activities. For the majority no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation and although most children are likely managed by reassurance and simple measures, a large range of interventions have been recommended.To (...) determine the effectiveness of medication for recurrent abdominal pain in school-age children.The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) 2006 (Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to Dec 2006), EMBASE (1980 to Dec 2006), CINAHL (1982 to Dec 2007), ERIC (1966 to Dec 2006), PsycINFO (1872 to Dec 2006), LILACS (1982 to Dec 2006), SIGLE (1980 to March 2005), and JICST (1985 to 06/2000) were searched with appropriate filtersStudies on school age children with RAP (Apley or the Rome II criteria for gastrointestinal diseases

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2008 Cochrane

16. Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. (PubMed)

Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood. Between 4% and 25% of school-age children complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) of sufficient severity to interfere with daily activities. It is unclear whether the diagnosis includes children with different aetiologies for their pain. For the majority no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation. Although most children are likely managed (...) by reassurance and simple measures, a large range of interventions have been recommended.To determine the effectiveness of dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in school-age children.The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) 2006 (Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to Dec 2006), EMBASE (1980 to Dec 2006), CINAHL (1982 to Dec 2007), ERIC (1966 to Dec 2006), PsycINFO (1872 to Dec 2006), LILACS (1982 to Dec 2006), SIGLE (1980 to March 2005), and JICST (1985 to 06/2000) were searched . Where appropriate, search filters

2008 Cochrane

17. An Unusual Pediatric Case of Seronegative Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presented With Acute Abdominal Pain and Gross Hematuria. (PubMed)

An Unusual Pediatric Case of Seronegative Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presented With Acute Abdominal Pain and Gross Hematuria. A child with acute abdomen with gross hematuria occasionally visits the emergency department (ED). Usually, such a condition is subject to differential diagnosis for stones, injuries, or sometimes malignancies in the urinary tract. Here we introduce an unusual case of a 9-year-old girl who presented to ED with acute lower abdominal pain and gross hematuria. She had (...) no medical history. An urgent computed tomographic image revealed a renal vein thrombosis. Laboratory tests for autoimmune diseases and coagulaopathies were performed, and the results were within normal ranges. At the time, she did not fulfil the criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome. Later at follow-up, however, she had a recurrent episode of renal vein thrombosis. A kidney biopsy was performed to reveal histology of membranous lupus nephropathy. The case emphasizes

2018 Pediatric Emergency Care

18. Refractory Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Be Wary of Acquired Angioedema due to C1 Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency (PubMed)

Refractory Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Be Wary of Acquired Angioedema due to C1 Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency Acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1INH-AAE) is a rare and potentially fatal syndrome of bradykinin-mediated angioedema characterized by episodes of angioedema without urticaria. It typically manifests with nonpitting edema of the skin and edema in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract mucosa or upper airway. Edema of the upper airway (...) and tongue may lead to life-threatening asphyxiation. C1INH-AAE is typically under-diagnosed because of its rarity and its propensity to mimic more common abdominal conditions and allergic reactions. In this article, we present the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of recently diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who presented to our hospital with recurrent abdominal pain, initially suspected to have Clostridium difficile colitis and diverticulitis. He received a final diagnosis

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2018 Case reports in hematology

19. Abdominal Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome

for this condition. A cohort of patients have benefitted with injection alone while recurrence has been noted in patients who have undergone surgery. This project aims to gain more understanding about the clinical course of patients with suspected ACNES by evaluation of the clinic progress. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Abdominal Pain Abdominal Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome Procedure: Injection to or release of anterior cutaneous nerves Study Design Go to Layout table for study information (...) by (Responsible Party): University of Aberdeen Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Nerve entrapment as a cause of chronic abdominal pain is frequently overlooked. A series of nerves pass through the muscles of the abdomen before reaching the skin to carry sensations. They can get trapped within the muscles leading to severe pain resulting in a condition known as Abdominal Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (ACNES). ACNES affects between 10-30% of patients with chronic abdominal wall pain

2018 Clinical Trials

20. Coping with Common GI Symptoms in the Community: A Global Perspective on Heartburn, Constipation, Bloating, and Abdominal Pain/Discomfort

developed in a multinational consensus in accordance with predefined symptom criteria [1]. Relatively few data are available on the epidemiology of individual symptoms (with the exception of constipation), although there are considerable data on FGID syndromes. The latter are frequently used as a surrogate for the former throughout this guideline—e.g., gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) for heartburn, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for abdominal pain/bloating. In addressing any disorder (...) regions, with considerable overlap: o Intestinal: 44% o Esophageal: 42% o Gastroduodenal: 26% o Anorectal: 26% • Females reported higher frequencies of dysphagia, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, abdominal pain, and biliary pain than males. • Males reported higher frequencies of bloating than females. • Symptom reporting, except for incontinence, declined with age. • Low socio-economic status, low educational attainment, and low income were associated with greater symptom reporting. 1.1.2

2013 World Gastroenterology Organisation

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