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Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line

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1. Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line

Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Rapid Internal (...) Jugular Vein Line Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line Aka: Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line , Rapid IJ Access II. Indications Rapid vascular access in emergency patients III. Preparation Apply sterile cover to high frequency linear probe Intravenous catheter Long peripheral IV: 18 gauge, 14.8 cm catheter over needle OR Long intravenous catheter from kit IV. Technique Use normal technique for visualizing internal jugular on Uses limited sterile technique Site prepped and needle advanced under guidance

2018 FP Notebook

2. Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line

Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Rapid Internal (...) Jugular Vein Line Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line Aka: Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line , Rapid IJ Access II. Indications Rapid vascular access in emergency patients III. Preparation Apply sterile cover to high frequency linear probe Intravenous catheter Long peripheral IV: 18 gauge, 14.8 cm catheter over needle OR Long intravenous catheter from kit IV. Technique Use normal technique for visualizing internal jugular on Uses limited sterile technique Site prepped and needle advanced under guidance

2016 FP Notebook

3. Bilateral Internal Jugular Veins Ultrasound Scanning Prior to CVC Placement

Bilateral Internal Jugular Veins Ultrasound Scanning Prior to CVC Placement Bilateral Internal Jugular Veins Ultrasound Scanning Prior to CVC Placement - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more (...) . Bilateral Internal Jugular Veins Ultrasound Scanning Prior to CVC Placement (BIUS) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02741453 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : April 18, 2016 Last Update Posted : July 14, 2017 Sponsor: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Information provided

2016 Clinical Trials

4. Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization

Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization Aka: Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization , Catheterization of Internal Jugular Vein , IJ Line , Internal Jugular Central Line , Jugular Vein Catheterization II. Indications catheter PreSep Central Venous Oximetry Catheter for Venous access Indicated when unable to obtain peripheral venous access Consider Emergency Indicated when unable (...) to get rapid peripheral access Consider instead Monitoring (CVP Line) Consider assessment of volume status instead Temporary venous pacing III. Contraindications (relative contraindication) Compressible sites may be considered (e.g. in this case the internal jugular) Contralateral or Do not place a on the "good side" opposite a compromised lung Applies most to subclavian line placement can however still complicate internal jugular catheterization Internal jugular thrombosis Pre-scan the internal s

2018 FP Notebook

5. Suspected Upper-Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis.

-403. 5. Mustafa S, Stein PD, Patel KC, Otten TR, Holmes R, Silbergleit A. Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. Chest. 2003;123(6):1953-1956. 6. Patel MC, Berman LH, Moss HA, McPherson SJ. Subclavian and internal jugular veins at Doppler US: abnormal cardiac pulsatility and respiratory phasicity as a predictor of complete central occlusion. Radiology. 1999;211(2):579-583. 7. Schmittling ZC, McLafferty RB, Bohannon WT, Ramsey DE, Hodgson KJ. Characterization and probability of upper extremity (...) , Morley P. Comparison of colour Doppler ultrasound with venography in the diagnosis of axillary and subclavian vein thrombosis. Br J Radiol. 1991;64(765):777-781. 33. Koksoy C, Kuzu A, Kutlay J, Erden I, Ozcan H, Ergin K. The diagnostic value of colour Doppler ultrasound in central venous catheter related thrombosis. Clin Radiol. 1995;50(10):687-689. 34. Weissleder R, Elizondo G, Stark DD. Sonographic diagnosis of subclavian and internal jugular vein thrombosis. J Ultrasound Med. 1987;6(10):577-587

2019 American College of Radiology

6. Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization

Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization Aka: Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization , Catheterization of Internal Jugular Vein , IJ Line , Internal Jugular Central Line , Jugular Vein Catheterization II. Indications catheter PreSep Central Venous Oximetry Catheter for Venous access Indicated when unable to obtain peripheral venous access Consider Emergency Indicated when unable (...) to get rapid peripheral access Consider instead Monitoring (CVP Line) Consider assessment of volume status instead Temporary venous pacing III. Contraindications (relative contraindication) Compressible sites may be considered (e.g. in this case the internal jugular) Contralateral or Do not place a on the "good side" opposite a compromised lung Applies most to subclavian line placement can however still complicate internal jugular catheterization Internal jugular thrombosis Pre-scan the internal s

2015 FP Notebook

7. Clinical practice guidelines for the care of girls and women with Turner syndrome: proceedings from the 2016 Cincinnati International Turner Syndrome Meeting

Clinical practice guidelines for the care of girls and women with Turner syndrome: proceedings from the 2016 Cincinnati International Turner Syndrome Meeting Clinical practice guidelines for the care of girls and women with Turner syndrome: proceedings from the 2016 Cincinnati International Turner Syndrome Meeting in: European Journal of Endocrinology Volume 177 Issue 3 Year 2017 This site uses cookies, tags, and tracking settings to store information that help give you the very best browsing (...) experience. If you don't change your settings, we'll assume you're happy with this. Google Translate to save searches and organize your favorite content. Not registered? Search Recently viewed (1) Clinical practice guidelines for the care of girls and women with Turner syndrome: proceedings from the 2016 Cincinnati International Turner Syndrome Meeting in Authors: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , and View More View Less 1 Departments of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine 2 Departments

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2016 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

8. Central Venous Access, Subclavian Vein, Supraclavicular Approach

the major venous system. Benefits over peripheral access include greater longevity without infection, line security in situ, avoidance of phlebitis, larger lumens, multiple lumens for rapid administration of combinations of drugs, a route for nutritional support, fluid administration, and central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring. Central vein catheterization is also referred to as central line placement. Overall complication rates are as high as 15%, [ , , , ] with mechanical complications reported in 5 (...) for the supraclavicular approach include the following: , neck, or subclavian vessel Coagulopathy (direct pressure to stop bleeding cannot be applied to the subclavian vein or artery, because of these structures' location beneath the clavicle) Relative contraindications for the supraclavicular approach include the following: Chest wall or neck deformity (COPD) Previous Next: Technical Considerations Whereas ultrasonographic guidance has proved to be a useful adjunct for internal jugular vein cannulation, its use

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Central Venous Access, Subclavian Vein, Subclavian Approach

of effective US-guided techniques. [ ] Compared with the studies evaluating the internal jugular approach, the studies evaluating US-guided approaches to the subclavian vein are fewer in number and lower in quality; nevertheless, their results are encouraging with respect to patient safety and quality. [ , ] The physician’s experience and comfort level with the procedure, however, are the main determinants as to the success of the line placement in cases with no other patient-related factors that may (...) complications in 2-26%. [ ] These complications are all potentially life-threatening and, invariably, consume significant resources to treat. Placement of a central vein catheter is a common procedure, and house staff require substantial training and supervision to become facile with this technique. A physician should have a thorough foreknowledge of the procedure and its complications before placing a central vein catheter. Compared with femoral site access, internal jugular or subclavian access

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Treatment)

Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Treatment) Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators: Practice Essentials, Overview, Evolution of the ICD Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) to deliver antitachycardia pacing therapy (ATP) or defibrillation. With antitachycardia pacing, the device delivers a preset number of rapid pulses in succession in an attempt to terminate the ventricular tachycardia. If antitachycardia pacing therapy is ineffective within a prespecified number of trials or a prespecified time period, or if the ventricular rate exceeds a preset rate, the device delivers a high-energy electric shock to reset the heart’s electrical activity. Previous Next: Evolution

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

11. Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Diagnosis)

Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Diagnosis) Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators: Practice Essentials, Overview, Evolution of the ICD Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) to deliver antitachycardia pacing therapy (ATP) or defibrillation. With antitachycardia pacing, the device delivers a preset number of rapid pulses in succession in an attempt to terminate the ventricular tachycardia. If antitachycardia pacing therapy is ineffective within a prespecified number of trials or a prespecified time period, or if the ventricular rate exceeds a preset rate, the device delivers a high-energy electric shock to reset the heart’s electrical activity. Previous Next: Evolution

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

12. Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Overview)

Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Overview) Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators: Practice Essentials, Overview, Evolution of the ICD Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) to deliver antitachycardia pacing therapy (ATP) or defibrillation. With antitachycardia pacing, the device delivers a preset number of rapid pulses in succession in an attempt to terminate the ventricular tachycardia. If antitachycardia pacing therapy is ineffective within a prespecified number of trials or a prespecified time period, or if the ventricular rate exceeds a preset rate, the device delivers a high-energy electric shock to reset the heart’s electrical activity. Previous Next: Evolution

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

13. Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Follow-up)

Pacemaker and Automatic Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (Follow-up) Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators: Practice Essentials, Overview, Evolution of the ICD Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) to deliver antitachycardia pacing therapy (ATP) or defibrillation. With antitachycardia pacing, the device delivers a preset number of rapid pulses in succession in an attempt to terminate the ventricular tachycardia. If antitachycardia pacing therapy is ineffective within a prespecified number of trials or a prespecified time period, or if the ventricular rate exceeds a preset rate, the device delivers a high-energy electric shock to reset the heart’s electrical activity. Previous Next: Evolution

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

14. Vein of Marshall Ethanol Infusion for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation FIBRILLATION

for ALL patients: measurements such as whether the treatment was successful or unsuccessful, X-ray exposure time, procedure time, whether there were any complications, and other general procedural measurements. Other Name: standard catheter ablation procedure, Active Comparator: Vein of Marshall and Standar procedure The doctor will inject Ethanol through a balloon catheter into the VOM Drug: Ethanol We enter the CS with a sheath advanced from the right internal jugular vein. A sub-selector catheter (...) (LA) anatomy marginally improves outcomes, but also leads to increases in procedural complexity and duration, need of repeat procedures, and complications such as atrial flutters, particularly perimitral flutter (PMF). The investigators have developed a technique to perform rapid ablation of atrial tissues in AF using ethanol infusion in the vein of Marshall (VOM), and have shown: 1) Effective, rapid and safe tissue ablation of LA tissue neighboring the LA ridge and left inferior PV; 2) Regional

2013 Clinical Trials

15. Guidelines on Chronic Coronary Syndromes

with strenuous exertion Presence of angina during strenuous, rapid, or prolonged ordinary activity (walking or climbing the stairs). II Angina with moderate exertion Slight limitation of ordinary activities when they are performed rapidly, after meals, in cold, in wind, under emotional stress, or during the first few hours after waking up, but also walking uphill, climbing more than one flight of ordinary stairs at a normal pace, and in normal conditions. III Angina with mild exertion Having difficulties (...) walking one or two blocks, or climbing one flight of stairs, at normal pace and conditions. IV Angina at rest No exertion needed to trigger angina. Grade Description of angina severity I Angina only with strenuous exertion Presence of angina during strenuous, rapid, or prolonged ordinary activity (walking or climbing the stairs). II Angina with moderate exertion Slight limitation of ordinary activities when they are performed rapidly, after meals, in cold, in wind, under emotional stress, or during

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2019 European Society of Cardiology

16. Pregnancy and Renal Disease

be viewed at www.nice.org.uk/accreditation Conflicts of Interest Statement All authors made declarations of interest in line with the policy in the Renal Association Clinical Practice Guidelines Development Manual. Further details can be obtained on request from the Renal Association. Method used to arrive at a recommendation The recommendations for the first draft of this guideline resulted from a collective decision reached by discussion between the authors and, whenever necessary, with input from (...) admission. This includes temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation. An early warning score should be calculated and actioned appropriately (1D). Guideline 4.9.3 We recommend additional assessment for women with an elevated early warning score, for women considered to be high-risk, and for any women in whom there is any clinical concern. This includes examination of jugular venous pressure, lung auscultation and urine output monitoring (in-dwelling catheter

2019 Renal Association

17. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI)

: August 2024 Renal Association Clinical Practice Guideline Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) - August 2019 2 Endorsements The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has accredited the process used by the Renal Association to produce its Clinical Practice Guidelines. Accreditation is valid for 5 years from January 2017. More information on accreditation can be viewed at www.nice.org.uk/accreditation Conflicts of Interest Statement All authors made declarations of interest in line (...) ], published in 2012, which included a detailed and comprehensive search strategy [5] Preliminary searches were run during 2017 but were then updated in April and May 2018, with a final review of key, emerging evidence undertaken by group review between April and August 2019. The formal literature search was supplemented by review of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and of other national / international clinical guidelines on AKI. Each topic area was reviewed by one or more adult nephrology

2019 Renal Association

18. SCAI clinical expert consensus statement on the classification of cardiogenic shock

Correspondence David A. Baran, Sentara Heart Hospital, 600 Gresham Drive, Norfolk, VA 23507. Email: Department of Cardiology, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York ACC Representative. Department of Internal Medicine, LSU Health School of Medicine, Shreveport, Louisiana Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York City, New York Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas Lindner Research Center at the Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio Cooper (...) University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey SCCM Representative. The CardioVascular Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia Sentara Heart Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Advanced Heart Failure Center and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia Heart Center Leipzig at University of Leipzig, Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Leipzig, Germany Department of Critical

2019 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

19. ACR–ASNR–SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance and Interpretation of Cervicocerebral Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA)

, possible dissection, stenosis, and aneurysmal dilatation. To the extent that venous structures are adequately opacified on CTA images (as opposed to a dedicated delayed CT venogram (CTV), evaluation of images for venous pathology is also necessary. The visible and adequately opacified veins should be commented on when appropriate. Interpretation of dedicated cervicocerebral CTV includes an assessment of the patency and caliber of the dural venous sinuses, cortical veins and internal jugular veins (...) for better characterizing known disease or assessing changes over time. With the goal of reducing radiation exposure to children, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) should be the first line of imaging in the pediatric and other vulnerable populations given the appropriate clinical setting [2,3]. While it is not possible to detect all cerebrovascular abnormalities using CTA, adherence to the following practice parameter will maximize the probability of their detection and optimize patient safety. CTA

2019 American Society of Neuroradiology

20. Management of Acute Myocardial Infarction in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation

of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial IRA infarct-related artery IU international units i.v. intravenous LBBB left bundle branch block LDL-C low-density lipoprotein cholesterol LGE late gadolinium enhancement LV left ventricle/ventricular LVAD Left ventricular assist device LVEF left ventricular ejection fraction MACE major adverse cardiac event MATRIX Minimizing Adverse Haemorrhagic Events by TRansradial Access Site and Systemic Implementation of angioX METOCARD- CNIC Effect of Metoprolol (...) for hyper-acute T-waves, which may precede ST-segment elevation). It is important to repeat the ECG or monitor for dynamic ST-segment changes. In addition, there is a concern that some patients with acute occlusion of a coronary artery and ongoing MI, such as those with an occluded circumflex coronary artery, , acute occlusion of a vein graft, or left main disease, may present without ST-segment elevation and be denied reperfusion therapy, resulting in a larger infarction and worse outcomes. Extending

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2017 European Society of Cardiology

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