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REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

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181. Sexsomnia and REM- predominant obstructive sleep apnea effectively treated with a mandibular advancement device Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sexsomnia and REM- predominant obstructive sleep apnea effectively treated with a mandibular advancement device Parasomnias with sexual behavior or sexsomnias are considered a subtype of NREM parasomnias. Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea (OSAH) has been described as a known triggering factor for parasomnias including sexsomnia. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) has been the standard of treatment for OSAH but mandibular advancement devices (MAD) are becoming an important (...) treatment alternative. We present the case of a patient with mild OSAH and sexsomnia who had resolution of both conditions with a MAD. This patient had the added uniqueness of having REM-predominant OSAH.

2016 Sleep science

182. Wheel Running Improves REM Sleep and Attenuates Stress-induced Flattening of Diurnal Rhythms in F344 Rats Full Text available with Trip Pro

of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise (...) Wheel Running Improves REM Sleep and Attenuates Stress-induced Flattening of Diurnal Rhythms in F344 Rats Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders

2016 Stress (Amsterdam, Netherlands)

183. REM Sleep and Its Loss-associated Epigenetic Regulation with Reference to Noradrenaline in Particular Full Text available with Trip Pro

), noradrenaline transporter (NAT) control NA levels and on the other hand, how NA per se may affect other molecules in neural circuitry at epigenetic level resulting in behavioral changes in health and diseases. An understanding of these events will expose the molecular basis of REMS and its loss-associated pathophysiological changes; which are presented as testable hypothesis for confirmation. (...) REM Sleep and Its Loss-associated Epigenetic Regulation with Reference to Noradrenaline in Particular Sleep, an essential physiological process, has been divided into rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) in higher animals. REMS is a unique phenomenon that unlike other sleep-waking states is not under voluntary control. Directly or indirectly it influences or gets influenced by most of the physiological processes controlled by the brain. It has been proposed that REMS serves

2016 Current neuropharmacology

184. Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease Full Text available with Trip Pro

Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease Characterized by dream-enactment motor manifestations arising from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently encountered in Parkinson's disease (PD). Yet the specific neurostructural changes associated with RBD in PD patients remain to be revealed by neuroimaging. Here we identified such neurostructural alterations by comparing large samples (...) and anterior cingulate cortex. These results demonstrate that RBD is associated with a prominent loss of volume in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, where cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are located and implicated in the promotion of REM sleep and muscle atonia. It is additionally associated with more widespread atrophy in other subcortical and cortical regions whose loss also likely contributes to the altered regulation of sleep-wake states and motor activity underlying RBD in PD patients.

2016 Scientific reports

185. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Symptoms Correlate with Domains of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Symptoms Correlate with Domains of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known regarding the relation between the severity of RBD and the different domains of cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was: (1) to investigate the domains of cognitive impairment in patients with PD (...) , and visuospatial function. The information of basic demographics, diseases and medication history, and motor and nonmotor manifestations was obtained and compared between PD-RBD and PD + RBD groups. Particular attention was paid to the severity of RBD assessed by the RBD Questionnaire-Hong Kong (RBDQ-HK) and the RBD Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ), then we further examined associations between the severity of RBD symptoms and cognitive levels via correlation analysis.Compared to PD-RBD subjects, PD + RBD

2016 Chinese medical journal

186. Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder: diagnosis, management, and the need for neuroprotective interventions. (Abstract)

Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder: diagnosis, management, and the need for neuroprotective interventions. Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (IRBD) manifests as unpleasant dreams and vigorous behaviours during REM sleep that can result in injuries. Patients with IRBD have no known neurological diseases or motor or cognitive complaints; however, this sleep disorder is not harmless. In most cases, IRBD is the prelude of the synucleinopathies (...) Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, or, less frequently, multiple system atrophy. Patients can show abnormalities that are characteristic of the synucleinopathies, and longitudinal follow-up shows that most patients develop parkinsonism and cognitive impairments with time. Thus, diagnosis of IRBD needs to be accurate and involves informing the patient of the risk of developing a neurodegenerative disease. It is extraordinary for a sleep disorder to precede the full expression

2016 Lancet Neurology

187. Neuromelanin-sensitive imaging in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder Full Text available with Trip Pro

of Neurology and Centre for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Kantarci Kejal K Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. eng P50 AG044170 AG NIA NIH HHS United States R01 AG040042 AG NIA NIH HHS United States Journal Article Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural Comment England Brain 0372537 0006-8950 AIM IM Brain. 2016 Apr;139(Pt 4):1180-8 26920675 Female Humans Locus Coeruleus pathology physiopathology Male REM Sleep Behavior Disorder diagnosis (...) Neuromelanin-sensitive imaging in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder 27012490 2016 08 19 2018 12 02 1460-2156 139 Pt 4 2016 Apr Brain : a journal of neurology Brain Neuromelanin-sensitive imaging in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. 1005-7 10.1093/brain/aww030 Boeve Bradley F BF Department of Neurology and Centre for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA bboeve@mayo.edu. St Louis Erik K EK Department

2016 Brain

188. A Remotely Supervised Exercise Program for Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiation (REM)

and during chemoradiation. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Lung Cancer Behavioral: Remotely Supervised Exercise (REM) Behavioral: Unsupervised Exercise (UNSUP) Not Applicable Detailed Description: The research team adopts an overtly pragmatic approach where our design choices are made to enhance external validity and create a parsimonious intervention that can be integrated into busy clinical practices. This is a pilot study and is not designed to definitively provide evidence (...) Exercise (UNSUP) The control condition represents a minimalist intervention that could occur in any setting: (1) enthusiastic provision on an exercise prescription and (2) provision of a fitness device (i.e., the Garmin VivioActive) that can help participants track their exercise engagement. Participants are instructed in how to use the device to track their adherence to the exercise prescription. Behavioral: Unsupervised Exercise (UNSUP) The control condition represents a minimalist intervention

2018 Clinical Trials

189. To Characterize the Performance of the Nasal Dilator Strip in Lowering Nasal Resistance During Sleep, Promoting Nasal Route Breathing and Reducing the Signs and Symptoms of Sleep Disordered Breathing in a Group of Chronic Nocturnal Nasal Congestion Suffer

, 2017 Last Update Posted : April 7, 2017 Sponsor: GlaxoSmithKline Information provided by (Responsible Party): GlaxoSmithKline Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: To characterize the performance of the nasal dilator strip in lowering nasal resistance during sleep, promoting nasal route breathing and reducing the signs and symptoms of sleep disordered breathing in a group of chronic nocturnal nasal congestion sufferers who report trouble with their sleep. Condition or disease (...) : NCT01004471 Other Study ID Numbers: 202203 First Posted: April 7, 2017 Last Update Posted: April 7, 2017 Last Verified: April 2017 Keywords provided by GlaxoSmithKline: Nasal dilator strip Sleep disordered breathing Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Respiratory Aspiration Sleep Apnea Syndromes Respiration Disorders Respiratory Tract Diseases Pathologic Processes Apnea Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic Dyssomnias Sleep Wake Disorders Nervous System Diseases

2017 Clinical Trials

190. Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease: the contribution of dopamine in REM sleep regulation. (Abstract)

Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease: the contribution of dopamine in REM sleep regulation. Nearly all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have sleep disturbances. While it has been suggested that these disturbances involve a dopaminergic component, the specific mechanisms that contribute to this behavior are far from being fully understood. In this article, we have reviewed the current understanding of the linkage between sleep and PD, focusing on the participation of the dopaminergic (...) system in the regulation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The presence of an REM sleep behavior disorder in patients with PD might reflect the early involvement of dopaminergic neurotransmission in REM sleep-related structures. Therefore, it has been suggested that these structures are affected by an imbalance of dopamine levels. Several studies have demonstrated that neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are active during REM sleep

2013 Sleep medicine reviews

191. Sleep in Parkinson's disease. (Abstract)

factors, for example it is necessary to distinguish sleep-related breathing disorders from medication effects, and to distinguish restless legs syndrome from the concomitant presence of potential mimics specific to Parkinson's disease, such as akathisia, nocturnal leg cramps, nocturnal hypokinesia, early morning dystonia, etc. The correct diagnosis of REM sleep behavior disorder is also not always easy, and video-polysomnography should be performed in order to exclude mimic-like movements at the end (...) Sleep in Parkinson's disease. Sleep disturbances are common in Parkinson's disease and comprise the entire spectrum of sleep disorders. On the one hand regulation of sleep and wakefulness is affected in Parkinson's disease, leading to the development of disorders, such as insomnia and daytime sleepiness. While on the other hand control of motor activity during sleep is impaired, with subsequent manifestation of parasomnias (mainly REM sleep behavior disorders, but also, albeit more rarely

2019 Neuropsychopharmacology

192. Sleep and neurological autoimmune diseases. (Abstract)

Sleep and neurological autoimmune diseases. Neurological autoimmune diseases are characterized by an inappropriate immune response that by mistake targets the nervous system. As a result, patients experiment a number of neurological manifestations that may include insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, central hypoventilation, and REM sleep behavior disorder. Polysomnographic evaluation may reveal disorganized sleep architecture involving both NREM and REM sleep, and REM sleep (...) intrusions into wakefulness. The study of sleep disorders in the setting of autoimmune diseases (e.g., narcolepsy, anti-IgLON5 disease, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes) shows that an abnormal immune-mediated (humoral or cellular) response target the neuronal structures (e.g., brainstem, hypothalamus) and neurotransmitters systems (e.g., hypocretin) that regulate sleep resulting in sleep impairment. It is a window to examine the link between the autoimmune system and the sleep regulation

2019 Neuropsychopharmacology

193. Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH): Role in REM Sleep and Depression Full Text available with Trip Pro

Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH): Role in REM Sleep and Depression The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptidergic neuromodulator synthesized by neurons of the lateral sector of the posterior hypothalamus and zona incerta. MCHergic neurons project throughout the central nervous system, including areas such as the dorsal (DR) and median (MR) raphe nuclei, which are involved in the control of sleep and mood. Major Depression (MD) is a prevalent psychiatric disease diagnosed (...) induces sleep, tends to indicate that MCH plays a critical role in the generation and maintenance of sleep, especially REM sleep. In addition, the acute microinjection of MCH into the DR promotes REM sleep, while immunoneutralization of this peptide within the DR decreases the time spent in this state. Moreover, microinjections of MCH into either the DR or MR promote a depressive-like behavior. In the DR, this effect is prevented by the systemic administration of antidepressant drugs (either

2015 Frontiers in neuroscience

194. REM Sleep at its Core – Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology Full Text available with Trip Pro

tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD. (...) REM Sleep at its Core – Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle

2015 Frontiers in neurology

195. Does CPAP ameliorate the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with obstructive sleep apnea?

with sleep-disordered breathing: The Sleep Heart Health Study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2006; 173:910. Gottlieb DJ, Yenokyan G, Newman AB, et al. Prospective study of obstructive sleep apnea and incident coronary heart disease and heart failure: the sleep heart health study. Circulation 2010; 122:352. Yumino D, Tsurumi Y, Takagi A, et al. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on clinical and angiographic outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Am J (...) the restorative stages of REM sleep and slow wave sleep. Adherence to CPAP is generally defined as use of CPAP for at least 4 hours per night, for 70% of the time, because using CPAP for 4 or more hours enables patients to experience improvements in daytime somnolence, neurocognitive function, and quality of life. As multiple studies have shown, treatment of OSA with CPAP has numerous cardiovascular benefits, including arrhythmia control and prevention of recurrence, improved glycemic control, and reduction

2019 Clinical Correlations

196. The Clinical Phenotype of Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder at Presentation: A Study in 203 Consecutive Patients Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Clinical Phenotype of Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder at Presentation: A Study in 203 Consecutive Patients To describe the clinical phenotype of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) at presentation in a sleep center.Clinical history review of 203 consecutive patients with IRBD identified between 1990 and 2014. IRBD was diagnosed by clinical history plus video-polysomnographic demonstration of REM sleep with increased electromyographic (...) . Lack of therapy with clonazepam resulted in an increased risk of sleep related injuries. Synucleinopathy was frequently diagnosed, even in patients with mild severity or uncommon IRBD presentations (e.g., patients who reported sleeping well, onset triggered by a life event, nocturnal ambulation) indicating that the development of a neurodegenerative disease is independent of the clinical presentation of IRBD.We report the largest IRBD cohort observed in a single center to date and highlight

2016 Sleep

197. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development Full Text available with Trip Pro

Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities have recently been identified as one of the most specific and potentially sensitive risk factors (...) for later development of any of the alpha-synucleinopathies: Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and other atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinson's disease who experience abnormalities in sleep electroencephalographic frequencies, sleep-wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures. These findings suggest a gradual

2016 Nature and science of sleep

198. Comparison Study of Polysomnographic Features in Multiple System Atrophy-cerebellar Types Combined with and without Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison Study of Polysomnographic Features in Multiple System Atrophy-cerebellar Types Combined with and without Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder The brain stem is found to be impaired in multiple system atrophy-cerebellar types (MSA-C). Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is reported as a marker of progressive brain stem dysfunction. Few systematic studies about the sleep disturbances in MSA-C patients combined with or without RBD were reported. This study aimed (...) for MSA-C. The Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test for continuous variables, and the Chi-square test for categorical variables were used in this study.MSA-C patients with RBD had younger visiting age (52.6 ± 7.4 vs. 56.7 ± 6.0 years, P = 0.046) and shorter duration of the disease (12.0 [12.0, 24.0] vs. 24.0 [14.0, 36.0] months, P = 0.009) than MSA-C patients without RBD. MSA-C with RBD had shorter REM sleep latency (111.7 ± 48.2 vs. 157.0 ± 68.8 min, P = 0.042), higher percentage of REM sleep (14.9

2016 Chinese medical journal

199. Mortality and Its Risk Factors in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mortality and Its Risk Factors in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder To determine the mortality and its risk factors in patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD).A total of 205 consecutive patients with video-polysomnography confirmed RBD (mean age = 66.4 ± 10.0 y, 78.5% males) were recruited. Medical records and death status were systematically reviewed in the computerized records of the health care system. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR (...) was significantly associated with age (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10), living alone (HR = 2.04; 95% CI, 1.39-2.99), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 3.38; 95% CI, 1.21-9.46), cancer (HR = 10.09; 95% CI, 2.65-38.42), periodic limb movements during sleep (HR = 3.06; 95% CI, 1.50-6.24), and development of neurodegenerative diseases (HR = 2.84; 95% CI, 1.47-5.45) and dementia (HR = 2.66; 95% CI, 1.39-5.08).Patients with RBD have a higher mortality rate than the general population only

2016 Sleep

200. Absent sleep EEG spindle activity in GluA1 (Gria1) knockout mice: relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders Full Text available with Trip Pro

the Gria1 gene which codes for the GluA1 subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor. Gria1-/- mice exhibit a phenotype relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders, including reduced synaptic plasticity and, at the behavioural level, attentional deficits leading to aberrant salience. In this study we report a striking reduction of EEG power density including the spindle-frequency range (10-15 Hz) during sleep in Gria1-/- mice. The reduction of spindle-activity in Gria1 (...) Absent sleep EEG spindle activity in GluA1 (Gria1) knockout mice: relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders Sleep EEG spindles have been implicated in attention, sensory processing, synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. In humans, deficits in sleep spindles have been reported in a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Genome-wide association studies have suggested a link between schizophrenia and genes associated with synaptic plasticity, including

2018 Translational psychiatry

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