How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

3,006 results for

Q Fever

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

41. Breast implant Q fever as a source of in hospital transmission. (PubMed)

Breast implant Q fever as a source of in hospital transmission. Herein, we describe the first case of mammary implant infection caused by Coxiella burnetii, resulting in delayed diagnosis and treatment and an in-hospital cross-transmission of Q fever to medical personnel.

2017 Clinical Infectious Diseases

42. Treatment of chronic Q fever: clinical efficacy and toxicity of antibiotic regimens. (PubMed)

Treatment of chronic Q fever: clinical efficacy and toxicity of antibiotic regimens. Evidence on the effectiveness of first-line treatment for chronic Q fever, tetracyclines (TET) plus hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), and potential alternatives is scarce.We performed a retrospective, observational cohort study to assess efficacy of treatment with TET plus quinolones (QNL), TET plus QNL plus HCQ, QNL monotherapy, or TET monotherapy compared to TET plus HCQ in chronic Q fever patients. We used a time (...) -dependent Cox proportional hazards model to assess our primary (all-cause mortality) and secondary outcomes (first disease-related event and therapy failure).We assessed 322 chronic Q fever patients; 276 (86%) received antibiotics. Compared to TET plus HCQ (n = 254; 92%), treatment with TET plus QNL (n = 49; 17%), TET plus QNL plus HCQ (n = 29, 10%), QNL monotherapy (n = 93; 34%), or TET monotherapy (n = 54; 20%) were not associated with primary or secondary outcomes. QNL and TET monotherapies were

2017 Clinical Infectious Diseases

43. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever: A cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever: A cross-sectional study. Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed (...) in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever.Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Medicine

44. First Case of Q Fever Endocarditis Involving the Melody<sup>®</sup> Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in an Afebrile Child. (PubMed)

First Case of Q Fever Endocarditis Involving the Melody® Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in an Afebrile Child. In this article we report the first case of Q fever endocarditis in a 13 years old child with a percutaneous pulmonary Melody® valve. The patient had a new onset of Melody valve dysfunction associated with the combination of hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia but was afebrile. Although blood cultures were negative, we have further investigated in the direction of infective

2017 Pediatric Cardiology

45. Acute Q Fever Case Detection among Acute Febrile Illness Patients, Thailand, 2002-2005. (PubMed)

Acute Q Fever Case Detection among Acute Febrile Illness Patients, Thailand, 2002-2005. Acute Q fever cases were identified from a hospital-based acute febrile illness study conducted in six community hospitals in rural north and northeast Thailand from 2002 to 2005. Of 1,784 participants that underwent Coxiella burnetii testing, nine (0.5%) participants were identified in this case-series as acute Q fever cases. Eight case-patients were located in one province. Four case-patients were (...) hospitalized. Median age was 13 years (range: 7-69); five were male. The proportion of children with acute Q fever infection was similar to adults (P = 0.17). This previously unrecognized at-risk group, school-age children, indicates that future studies and prevention interventions should target this population. The heterogeneity of disease burden across Thailand and milder clinical presentations found in this case-series should be considered in future studies. As diagnosis based on serology is limited

2017 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

46. Surveillance for Q Fever Endocarditis in the United States, 1999-2015. (PubMed)

Surveillance for Q Fever Endocarditis in the United States, 1999-2015. Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. In some persons, particularly those with cardiac valve disease, infection with C. burnetii can cause a life-threatening infective endocarditis. There are few descriptive analyses of Q fever endocarditis in the United States.Q fever case report forms submitted during 1999-2015 were reviewed to identify reports describing endocarditis. Cases were categorized (...) . Eight patients with endocarditis had phase I immunoglobulin G antibody titers >800 but did not meet the CSTE case definition for Q fever endocarditis.These data summarize a limited set of clinical and epidemiological features of Q fever endocarditis collected through passive surveillance in the United States. Some cases of apparent Q fever endocarditis could not be classified by CSTE laboratory criteria, suggesting that comparison of phase I and phase II titers could be reexamined as a surveillance

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Clinical Infectious Diseases

47. Chronic Q Fever Infections in Israeli Children - A 25-Year Nationwide Study. (PubMed)

Chronic Q Fever Infections in Israeli Children - A 25-Year Nationwide Study. Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) with a worldwide distribution. Our aim was to assess the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and treatment regimens of chronic Q fever infections in Israeli children during the past 25 years.Cases were collected from the national Q fever reference laboratory database. Demographic, epidemiologic and clinical data were reviewed using (...) a structured questionnaire sent to the referring physician. Cases were defined according to the new Dutch Consensus Guidelines.A total of 16 children originating from all regions of the country were found positive for chronic Q fever infections. The most common infection site was bone or joint (8/16, 50%), all in previously healthy children. Endovascular infections were found in 5 children (31%), all with an antecedent cardiac graft insertion. According to the new Consensus Guidelines, 9 children (56%) had

2017 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

48. Remarkable spatial variation in the seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii after a large Q fever epidemic. (PubMed)

Remarkable spatial variation in the seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii after a large Q fever epidemic. Prior to the 2007-2010 Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands, the seroprevalence of antibodies against Coxiella burnetii in the general population was 1.5%, which is low compared to other countries. We aimed to determine the seroprevalence after the Q fever epidemic among people living in the affected area, compare the seroprevalence with the incidence of Q fever notifications during the 2007 (...) -2010 Q fever epidemic, and to identify farm exposures associated with having antibodies against C. burnetii.During the period March 2014-February 2015, residents aged 18-70 years from two provinces were invited by general practitioners to complete a questionnaire on their symptoms and personal characteristics and to submit a blood sample. We used the mandatory provincial database of livestock licences to calculate distance to farms/farm animals for each participant. To compare ELISA-positive

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 BMC Infectious Diseases

49. Dot map cartograms for detection of infectious disease outbreaks: an application to Q fever, the Netherlands and pertussis, Germany. (PubMed)

Dot map cartograms for detection of infectious disease outbreaks: an application to Q fever, the Netherlands and pertussis, Germany. Geographical mapping of infectious diseases is an important tool for detecting and characterising outbreaks. Two common mapping methods, dot maps and incidence maps, have important shortcomings. The former does not represent population density and can compromise case privacy, and the latter relies on pre-defined administrative boundaries. We propose a method (...) that overcomes these limitations: dot map cartograms. These create a point pattern of cases while reshaping spatial units, such that spatial area becomes proportional to population size. We compared these dot map cartograms with standard dot maps and incidence maps on four criteria, using two example datasets. Dot map cartograms were able to illustrate both incidence and absolute numbers of cases (criterion 1): they revealed potential source locations (Q fever, the Netherlands) and clusters with high

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Euro Surveillance

50. Live Cell Therapy as Potential Risk Factor for Q Fever. (PubMed)

Live Cell Therapy as Potential Risk Factor for Q Fever. During an outbreak of Q fever in Germany, we identified an infected sheep flock from which animals were routinely used as a source for life cell therapy (LCT), the injection of fetal cells or cell extracts from sheep into humans. Q fever developed in 7 LCT recipients from Canada, Germany, and the United States.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Emerging Infectious Diseases

51. CXCL9, a promising biomarker in the diagnosis of chronic Q fever. (PubMed)

CXCL9, a promising biomarker in the diagnosis of chronic Q fever. In the aftermath of the largest Q fever outbreak in the world, diagnosing the potentially lethal complication chronic Q fever remains challenging. PCR, Coxiella burnetii IgG phase I antibodies, CRP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan are used for diagnosis and monitoring in clinical practice. We aimed to identify and test biomarkers in order to improve discriminative power of the diagnostic tests and monitoring of chronic Q fever.We (...) performed a transcriptome analysis on C. burnetii stimulated PBMCs of 4 healthy controls and 6 chronic Q fever patients and identified genes that were most differentially expressed. The gene products were determined using Luminex technology in whole blood samples stimulated with heat-killed C. burnetii and serum samples from chronic Q fever patients and control subjects.Gene expression of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL8 was strongly up-regulated in C. burnetii stimulated PBMCs of chronic Q

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 BMC Infectious Diseases

52. Are brucellosis, Q fever and melioidosis potential causes of febrile illness in Madagascar? (PubMed)

Are brucellosis, Q fever and melioidosis potential causes of febrile illness in Madagascar? Brucellosis, Q fever and melioidosis are zoonoses, which can lead to pyrexia. These diseases are often under-ascertained and underreported because of their unspecific clinical signs and symptoms, insufficient awareness by physicians and public health officers and limited diagnostic capabilities, especially in low-resource countries. Therefore, the presence of Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Acta Tropica

53. No Such Thing as Chronic Q Fever. (PubMed)

No Such Thing as Chronic Q Fever. Modern diagnostic methods enable clinicians to look beyond a diagnosis of chronic Q fever and discern whether patients instead have persistent focalized Coxiella burnetii infection(s). Use of these methods and development of criteria to define and treat such infections, especially cardiovascular infections, will improve the prognosis for patients previously thought to have chronic Q fever.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Emerging Infectious Diseases

54. Seroprevalence of Q fever among human and animal in Iran; a systematic review and meta-Analysis. (PubMed)

Seroprevalence of Q fever among human and animal in Iran; a systematic review and meta-Analysis. Q fever is a main zoonotic disease around the world. The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the overall seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii among human and animal population in Iran.Major national and international databases were searched from 2005 up to August 2016. We extracted the prevalence of Q fever antibodies (IgG) as the main primary outcome. We reported the prevalence (...) of the seropositivity as point and 95% confidence intervals.The overall seroprevalence of IgG phase I and II antibodies of Q fever in human was 19.80% (95% CI: 16.35-23.25%) and 32.86% (95% CI: 23.80-41.92%), respectively. The herd and individual prevalence of C. burnetii antibody in goat were 93.42% (95% CI: 80.23-100.00) and 31.97% (95% CI: 20.96-42.98%), respectively. The herd and individual prevalence of Q fever antibody in sheep's were 96.07% (95% CI: 89.11-100.00%) and 24.66% (95% CI: 19.81-29.51

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 PLoS neglected tropical diseases

55. Effectiveness of Long-term Doxycycline Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Fatigue Severity in Patients with Q Fever Fatigue Syndrome (Qure Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial. (PubMed)

Effectiveness of Long-term Doxycycline Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Fatigue Severity in Patients with Q Fever Fatigue Syndrome (Qure Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial. Approximately 20% of patients with acute Q fever will develop chronic fatigue, referred to as Q fever fatigue syndrome (QFS). The objective of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to assess the efficacy of either long-term treatment with doxycycline or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing (...) fatigue severity in patients with QFS.Adult patients were included who met the QFS criteria according to the Dutch guideline: a new onset of severe fatigue lasting ≥6 months with significant disabilities, related to an acute Q fever infection, without other somatic or psychiatric comorbidity explaining the fatigue. Using block randomization, patients were randomized between oral study medication and CBT (2:1) for 24 weeks. Second, a double-blind randomization between doxycycline (200 mg/day, once

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Clinical Infectious Diseases

56. Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases in chronic Q fever. (PubMed)

Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases in chronic Q fever. Chronic Q fever is a persistent infection with the intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii, which can lead to complications of infected aneurysms. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) cleave extracellular matrix and are involved in infections as well as aneurysms. We aimed to study the role of MMPs in the pathogenesis of chronic Q fever.We investigated gene expression of MMPs through microarray analysis and MMP production (...) with ELISA in C. burnetii-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with chronic Q fever and healthy controls. Twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MMP and tissue inhibitor of MMP genes were genotyped in 139 patients with chronic Q fever and 220 controls with similar cardiovascular co-morbidity. Additionally, circulating MMPs levels in patients with chronic Q fever were compared with those in cardiovascular controls with and without a history of past Q fever.In healthy

2017 Clinical Microbiology and Infection

57. Epidemiology of Q fever in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis for estimating serological and molecular prevalence. (PubMed)

Epidemiology of Q fever in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis for estimating serological and molecular prevalence. Q fever is endemic in Iran, thus, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on epidemiology of Coxiella burnetii among humans and animals in Iran.A systematic search was performed to identify all articles reporting C. burnetii prevalence in Iranian humans or animals, published from January 2000 to January 2015. Data from articles were extracted, and a pooled (...) estimate of prevalence with corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using random effect method.In this review, 27 papers were identified. The pooled seroprevalence of Q fever in animals was 27% (CI 95%: 23%-32%). The prevalence was 33% (CI 95%: 22%-45%) in goats, 27% (CI 95%: 21%-32%) in sheep, and 17% (CI 95%: 5%-28%) in cattle. The bacterial DNA was detected in 5% (95% CI: 3%-9%) of milk samples, and it was higher in cattle (10%; 95% CI: 6%-16%) than sheep (2%; 95% CI: 0-7

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Journal of research in medical sciences : the official journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

58. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) population in Algeria (PubMed)

Seroprevalence and risk factors for Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) population in Algeria Query (Q) fever is a globally distributed zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a bacterial agent for which ruminants are the most prevalent natural reservoir. Data regarding Q fever infection in camels in Algeria are limited. Therefore, a survey to detect seroprevalence of C. burnetii antibodies was conducted among healthy camel (...) populations in a vast area in southeastern Algeria to determine distribution of the Q fever causative organism and to identify risk factors associated with infection. Between January and March 2016, blood samples were collected from 184 camels and serum samples were subsequently analysed using a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit. At the time of blood collection, a questionnaire investigating 13 potential predisposing factors associated with C. burnetii seropositivity was completed

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research

59. Cross-sectional study for determining the prevalence of Q fever in small ruminants and humans at El Minya Governorate, Egypt (PubMed)

Cross-sectional study for determining the prevalence of Q fever in small ruminants and humans at El Minya Governorate, Egypt Q fever is a febrile illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) and is transmitted to humans from small ruminants via contaminated secreta and excreta of infected animals. This pathogen threatens public health; however, little is known regarding Q fever prevalence in humans and small ruminants. Therefore, we employed a cross-sectional design (...) to determine the Q fever seroprevalence and the associated risk factors in small ruminants and their owners in El Minya Governorate, Egypt between August 2016 and January 2017.The seroprevalence of C. burnetii IgG antibodies was 25.68% (28 of 109), 28.20% (11 of 39) and 25.71% (9 of 35) in sheep, goats, and humans, respectively. None of the studied variables in small ruminants differed significantly between the seropositive and seronegative animals. There was a significantly higher prevalence (P = 0.0435

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 BMC research notes

60. Seroprevalence of rickettsial infections and Q fever in Bhutan (PubMed)

Seroprevalence of rickettsial infections and Q fever in Bhutan With few studies conducted to date, very little is known about the epidemiology of rickettsioses in Bhutan. Due to two previous outbreaks and increasing clinical cases, scrub typhus is better recognized than other rickettsial infections and Q fever.A descriptive cross-sectional serosurvey was conducted from January to March 2015 in eight districts of Bhutan. Participants were 864 healthy individuals from an urban (30%) and a rural (...) (70%) sampling unit in each of the eight districts. Serum samples were tested by microimmunofluorescence assay for rickettsial antibodies at the Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory.Of the 864 participants, 345 (39.9%) were males and the mean age of participants was 41.1 (range 13-98) years. An overall seroprevalence of 49% against rickettsioses was detected. Seroprevalence was highest against scrub typhus group (STG) (22.6%) followed by spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsia (15.7%), Q fever

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 PLoS neglected tropical diseases

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>