How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

3,589 results for

Q Fever

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

181. Suspected person-to-person transmission of Q fever among hospitalized pregnant women. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Suspected person-to-person transmission of Q fever among hospitalized pregnant women. We report a case of suspected patient-to-patient transmission of Q fever among pregnant women in a high-risk pregnancy unit, presumably via aerosolization of vaginally excreted infectious placental particles. This case questions whether current infection control guidelines are sufficient for Q fever-infected women in similar settings.

2014 Clinical Infectious Diseases

182. Immunogenicity of the Q fever skin test. (Abstract)

Immunogenicity of the Q fever skin test. The Q fever skin test is used to measure cell-mediated immunity to Coxiella burnetii in pre-vaccination screening to exclude individuals with pre-existing immunity. We investigated whether this in-vivo test influences subsequent measurements of immune response.We assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses before, and 6 and 12 months after skin testing in 63 individuals who were not vaccinated because of either a positive skin test or positive (...) at 6 months (P = 0.009) and 223 ± 91 pg/mL at 12 months (P = 0.17). Of the 28 subjects with positive serology (and unknown skin test results), 21/28 (75%) showed an increase in IgG anti-phase I titres at 6 months, and 11/25 (44%) at 12 months. The mean ± SE specific IFN-γ production was significantly increased at 6 months, but not at 12 months.Q fever skin testing causes higher antibody titres and higher in-vitro IFN-γ to C. burnetii, and therefore affects subsequent Q fever diagnostics.Copyright ©

2014 Journal of Infection

183. Q Fever (Diagnosis)

include tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human-to-human transmission. A: Chest radiograph with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. Signs and symptoms Acute Q fever The 3 main clinical presentations of acute Q fever are as follows: A self-limited, influenzalike febrile illness (up to 40°C) (88-100%) of abrupt onset, which is often accompanied by headache (68-98%) (typically retrobulbar), myalgia (47-69%) (arthralgia is uncommon (...) with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. See also , , , , , and . Historical information Edward Derrick first described the illness Q (for query, owing to the elusiveness of its etiology) fever in 1937 during a cluster of acute febrile illness in abattoir workers in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. [ ] The causative organism was later isolated from Derrick's patients by Burnet and Freeman as a Rickettsia species. Simultaneously, although primarily disseminated

2014 eMedicine.com

184. Q Fever (Overview)

tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human-to-human transmission. A: Chest radiograph with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. Signs and symptoms Acute Q fever The 3 main clinical presentations of acute Q fever are as follows: A self-limited, influenzalike febrile illness (up to 40°C) (88-100%) of abrupt onset, which is often accompanied by headache (68-98%) (typically retrobulbar), myalgia (47-69%) (arthralgia is uncommon), chills (68 (...) with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. See also , , , , , and . Historical information Edward Derrick first described the illness Q (for query, owing to the elusiveness of its etiology) fever in 1937 during a cluster of acute febrile illness in abattoir workers in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. [ ] The causative organism was later isolated from Derrick's patients by Burnet and Freeman as a Rickettsia species. Simultaneously, although primarily disseminated

2014 eMedicine.com

185. Q Fever (Treatment)

== processing > Q Fever Treatment & Management Updated: Oct 11, 2017 Author: Kerry O Cleveland, MD; Chief Editor: Burke A Cunha, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Q Fever Treatment Approach Considerations As with any patient with a febrile illness, the physician should maintain a sufficient level of suspicion about any patient with fever to exclude other potentially life-threatening diseases, which, in the case of tick-borne disease, involves presumptive antibiotic therapy. Although (...) Q Fever (Treatment) Q Fever Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Management of Acute Q Fever, Management of Chronic Q Fever Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjI3MTU2LXRyZWF0bWVudA

2014 eMedicine.com

186. Q Fever (Follow-up)

== processing > Q Fever Treatment & Management Updated: Oct 11, 2017 Author: Kerry O Cleveland, MD; Chief Editor: Burke A Cunha, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Q Fever Treatment Approach Considerations As with any patient with a febrile illness, the physician should maintain a sufficient level of suspicion about any patient with fever to exclude other potentially life-threatening diseases, which, in the case of tick-borne disease, involves presumptive antibiotic therapy. Although (...) Q Fever (Follow-up) Q Fever Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Management of Acute Q Fever, Management of Chronic Q Fever Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjI3MTU2LXRyZWF0bWVudA

2014 eMedicine.com

187. Tick-Borne Diseases, Q Fever (Treatment)

=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjI3MTU2LXRyZWF0bWVudA== processing > Q Fever Treatment & Management Updated: Oct 11, 2017 Author: Kerry O Cleveland, MD; Chief Editor: Burke A Cunha, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Q Fever Treatment Approach Considerations As with any patient with a febrile illness, the physician should maintain a sufficient level of suspicion about any patient with fever to exclude other potentially life-threatening diseases, which, in the case of tick-borne disease, involves presumptive antibiotic therapy (...) Tick-Borne Diseases, Q Fever (Treatment) Q Fever Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Management of Acute Q Fever, Management of Chronic Q Fever Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

188. Q Fever (Follow-up)

== processing > Q Fever Treatment & Management Updated: Oct 11, 2017 Author: Kerry O Cleveland, MD; Chief Editor: Burke A Cunha, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Q Fever Treatment Approach Considerations As with any patient with a febrile illness, the physician should maintain a sufficient level of suspicion about any patient with fever to exclude other potentially life-threatening diseases, which, in the case of tick-borne disease, involves presumptive antibiotic therapy. Although (...) Q Fever (Follow-up) Q Fever Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Management of Acute Q Fever, Management of Chronic Q Fever Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjI3MTU2LXRyZWF0bWVudA

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

189. Q Fever (Overview)

tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human-to-human transmission. A: Chest radiograph with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. Signs and symptoms Acute Q fever The 3 main clinical presentations of acute Q fever are as follows: A self-limited, influenzalike febrile illness (up to 40°C) (88-100%) of abrupt onset, which is often accompanied by headache (68-98%) (typically retrobulbar), myalgia (47-69%) (arthralgia is uncommon), chills (68 (...) with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. See also , , , , , and . Historical information Edward Derrick first described the illness Q (for query, owing to the elusiveness of its etiology) fever in 1937 during a cluster of acute febrile illness in abattoir workers in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. [ ] The causative organism was later isolated from Derrick's patients by Burnet and Freeman as a Rickettsia species. Simultaneously, although primarily disseminated

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

190. Q Fever (Diagnosis)

include tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human-to-human transmission. A: Chest radiograph with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. Signs and symptoms Acute Q fever The 3 main clinical presentations of acute Q fever are as follows: A self-limited, influenzalike febrile illness (up to 40°C) (88-100%) of abrupt onset, which is often accompanied by headache (68-98%) (typically retrobulbar), myalgia (47-69%) (arthralgia is uncommon (...) with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. See also , , , , , and . Historical information Edward Derrick first described the illness Q (for query, owing to the elusiveness of its etiology) fever in 1937 during a cluster of acute febrile illness in abattoir workers in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. [ ] The causative organism was later isolated from Derrick's patients by Burnet and Freeman as a Rickettsia species. Simultaneously, although primarily disseminated

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

191. Tick-Borne Diseases, Q Fever (Diagnosis)

of transmission include tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human-to-human transmission. A: Chest radiograph with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. Signs and symptoms Acute Q fever The 3 main clinical presentations of acute Q fever are as follows: A self-limited, influenzalike febrile illness (up to 40°C) (88-100%) of abrupt onset, which is often accompanied by headache (68-98%) (typically retrobulbar), myalgia (47-69%) (arthralgia is uncommon (...) with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. See also , , , , , and . Historical information Edward Derrick first described the illness Q (for query, owing to the elusiveness of its etiology) fever in 1937 during a cluster of acute febrile illness in abattoir workers in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. [ ] The causative organism was later isolated from Derrick's patients by Burnet and Freeman as a Rickettsia species. Simultaneously, although primarily disseminated

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

192. Tick-Borne Diseases, Q Fever (Overview)

of transmission include tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human-to-human transmission. A: Chest radiograph with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. Signs and symptoms Acute Q fever The 3 main clinical presentations of acute Q fever are as follows: A self-limited, influenzalike febrile illness (up to 40°C) (88-100%) of abrupt onset, which is often accompanied by headache (68-98%) (typically retrobulbar), myalgia (47-69%) (arthralgia is uncommon (...) with normal findings. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating Q fever pneumonia. See also , , , , , and . Historical information Edward Derrick first described the illness Q (for query, owing to the elusiveness of its etiology) fever in 1937 during a cluster of acute febrile illness in abattoir workers in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. [ ] The causative organism was later isolated from Derrick's patients by Burnet and Freeman as a Rickettsia species. Simultaneously, although primarily disseminated

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

193. Tick-Borne Diseases, Q Fever (Follow-up)

=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjI3MTU2LXRyZWF0bWVudA== processing > Q Fever Treatment & Management Updated: Oct 11, 2017 Author: Kerry O Cleveland, MD; Chief Editor: Burke A Cunha, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Q Fever Treatment Approach Considerations As with any patient with a febrile illness, the physician should maintain a sufficient level of suspicion about any patient with fever to exclude other potentially life-threatening diseases, which, in the case of tick-borne disease, involves presumptive antibiotic therapy (...) Tick-Borne Diseases, Q Fever (Follow-up) Q Fever Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Management of Acute Q Fever, Management of Chronic Q Fever Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

194. Epidemiología de la fiebre Q en España (2018) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Epidemiología de la fiebre Q en España (2018) Q fever is an anthropozoonosis whose causative agent is Coxiella burnetii, which has an important impact from the human and animal health point of view. In this review, a brief historical reference of the infection by C. burnetii and Q fever has been made initially. In a second section the basic epidemiological aspects of this infection are described (reservoirs/ sources of infection, form of transmission and epidemiological forms). Subsequently (...) , the data of the infection by C. burnetii in Spain will be are indicated, particularly the clinical series, the seroepidemiological studies in humans, the affectation of different types of mammals and the participation of the ticks in the biological cycle. In addition, basic data on C. burnetii infection/ disease in other regions of the world will be are also included. Finally, and taking into account the previous data will indicate the main epidemiological characteristics of Q fever at present.©

2018 Revista Española de Quimioterapia

195. Doxycycline desensitization in chronic Q fever—A critical tool for the clinician Full Text available with Trip Pro

Doxycycline desensitization in chronic Q fever—A critical tool for the clinician We present the case of a 45 year old woman with acute Q fever pneumonia who progressed to the chronic phase of the disease despite azithromycin therapy. A trial of doxycycline was halted because of severe allergy and she was put on clarithromycin and later moxifloxacin. Failure of both drugs required desensitization to doxycycline with escalating doses. After two-year treatment with doxycycline-hydroxychloroquine

2018 IDCases

196. The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (2nd edition)Lead authors Professor Jonathan Carapetis (Chair); Professor Alex Brown; Associate Professor Graeme Maguire; Dr Warren Walsh Ms Sara Noonan; Mr Dale Thompson (Coordination and Secretariat) Major contributors Mr Marc Rémond; Dr Bo Remenyi; Dr Andrew (...) are reserved. Enquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to info@rhdaustralia.org.au Suggested citation RHDAustralia (ARF/RHD writing group), National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (2nd edition). 2012 ISBN 978-0-9587722-9-7 (paperback) 978-0-9587722-5-9 (online) Disclaimer This publication was funded by the Australian

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

197. Virucidal Activity of β-Propiolactone Vapor: II. Effect on the Etio-logical Agents of Smallpox, Yellow Fever, Psittacosis, and Q Fever Full Text available with Trip Pro

Virucidal Activity of β-Propiolactone Vapor: II. Effect on the Etio-logical Agents of Smallpox, Yellow Fever, Psittacosis, and Q Fever 13814579 1998 11 01 2018 12 01 0003-6919 8 1960 Jan Applied microbiology Appl Microbiol Virucidal activity of beta-propiolactone vapor. II. Effect on the etiological agents of smallpox, yellow fever, psittacosis, and Q fever. 39-41 DAWSON F W FW JANSSEN R J RJ HOFFMAN R K RK eng Journal Article United States Appl Microbiol 7605802 0003-6919 0 Anti-Infective (...) Agents, Local 6RC3ZT4HB0 Propiolactone OM Anti-Infective Agents, Local pharmacology Humans Propiolactone Psittacosis Q Fever Smallpox Variola virus Viruses pharmacology Yellow Fever ANTISEPTICS/pharmacology VIRUSES/pharmacology 1960 1 1 1960 1 1 0 1 1960 1 1 0 0 ppublish 13814579 PMC1057547 Appl Microbiol. 1958 Sep;6(5):358-62 13571980 Appl Microbiol. 1959 Jul;7(4):199-201 13661862

1960 Applied microbiology

198. Serosurvey of <i>Coxiella burnetii</i> in high risk population in Turkey, endemic to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Serosurvey of Coxiella burnetii in high risk population in Turkey, endemic to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus. Q fever caused by Coxiella burnetii is a zoonotic infection that spreads to human beings from animals. This study was aimed to demographically examine the C. burnetii seroprevalence in the people living in villages where Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is endemic, in terms of various risk factors such as tick bites, tick contact, and occupational groups.A (...) . burnetii serology (p = 0.787), and the rate of co-seropositivity between them was 5.43% (21/387).The findings of the study showed that C. burnetii infection is epidemic especially in the people living in rural areas. Contact with ticks in various ways might have resulted in the increased risk of C. burnetii infection in the study. Personal protective measures against tick bites may be important for reducing Q fever risk as in other tick-borne infectious disease.

2017 Journal of Vector Borne Disease

199. Aggressive Antipyretics for Fever Reduction in CNS Malaria

Aggressive Antipyretics for Fever Reduction in CNS Malaria Aggressive Antipyretics for Fever Reduction in CNS Malaria - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Aggressive Antipyretics for Fever (...) Hyperpyrexia Drug: Acetaminophen Drug: Ibuprofen Drug: placebo for acetaminophen Drug: placebo for ibuprofen Phase 2 Detailed Description: Despite ongoing eradication efforts, malaria remains a major public health challenge in Africa where annually, ~250,000 children with malaria experience a neurologic injury with subsequent neurodisability. In other central nervous system (CNS) disorders, fever is a recognized cause of worsening secondary neurologic injury and ex-tensive efforts are made to avoid

2017 Clinical Trials

200. Photo Quiz: A Man with Fever and Headache Full Text available with Trip Pro

Photo Quiz: A Man with Fever and Headache 28122992 2018 07 23 2018 07 23 1098-660X 55 2 2017 02 Journal of clinical microbiology J. Clin. Microbiol. Photo Quiz: A Man with Fever and Headache. 351 10.1128/JCM.00193-15 Bryan Allen W AW Jr Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Qian Qinfang Q Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Kirby James (...) E JE Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA jekirby@bidmc.harvard.edu. eng Case Reports Editorial United States J Clin Microbiol 7505564 0095-1137 IM Blood parasitology Diarrhea etiology Fever etiology HIV Infections complications Haiti Headache etiology Humans Malaria, Falciparum diagnosis pathology Male Microscopy Middle Aged Travel Travel-Related Illness 2017 1 27 6 0 2017 1 27 6 0 2018 7 24 6 0 ppublish 28122992 55

2017 Journal of clinical microbiology

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>