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Pulmonary Flow Murmur

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1. Pulmonary Flow Murmur

Pulmonary Flow Murmur Pulmonary Flow Murmur Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pulmonary Flow Murmur Pulmonary Flow (...) Murmur Aka: Pulmonary Flow Murmur From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Ages affected: School age to adolescence III. Signs Intensity: Grade I-II of VI murmur Soft, early to mid- at left upper sternal border (between 2nd and 3rd ribs) Crescendo-Decrescendo murmur Increased murmur in high output states Loudest when supine and decreased when upright or during breath holding IV. Differential Diagnosis (ASD) Pulmonic stenosis V. Course Innocent murmur Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing

2018 FP Notebook

2. Asymptomatic young man with an incidental murmur. (Abstract)

Asymptomatic young man with an incidental murmur. A 32-year old man was referred to our institution for transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) following detection of an incidental murmur on physical examination before blood donation. He was asymptomatic with no significant medical history. Physical examination revealed dual heart sounds with a grade II/VI systolic murmur heard in the left sternal border. An ECG was in normal sinus rhythm. TTE was performed (figure 1A-C, online supplementary (...) videos 1-4) followed by cardiac CT angiography (CTA) (figure 1D,E).heartjnl;104/15/1307/F1F1F1Figure 1(A) Transthoracic echocardiography, parasternal left ventricular long axis view. (B) Colour Doppler of modified short axis in the mid-left ventricular level. (C) Doppler flow velocity profile. (D) Cardiac CT angiography (CTA) sagittal reconstruction. (E) Three-dimensional CTA reconstruction of the heart.What is the diagnosis?Pericardial cyst.Ventricular septal defect.Kawasaki.Anomalous left coronary

2018 Heart

3. Pulmonary Flow Murmur

Pulmonary Flow Murmur Pulmonary Flow Murmur Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pulmonary Flow Murmur Pulmonary Flow (...) Murmur Aka: Pulmonary Flow Murmur From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Ages affected: School age to adolescence III. Signs Intensity: Grade I-II of VI murmur Soft, early to mid- at left upper sternal border (between 2nd and 3rd ribs) Crescendo-Decrescendo murmur Increased murmur in high output states Loudest when supine and decreased when upright or during breath holding IV. Differential Diagnosis (ASD) Pulmonic stenosis V. Course Innocent murmur Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing

2015 FP Notebook

4. Accidental Heart Murmurs Full Text available with Trip Pro

in the pediatric cardiology.In the group of accidental murmurs we include classic vibratory parasternal-precordial Stills murmur, pulmonary ejection murmur, the systolic murmur of pulmonary flow in neonates, venous hum, carotid bruit, Potaine murmur, benign cephalic murmur and mammary souffle.Accidental heart murmurs are revealed by auscultation in over 50% of children and youth, with a peak occurrence between 3-6 years or 8-12 years of life. Reducing the frequency of murmurs in the later period can be related (...) Accidental Heart Murmurs Accidental murmurs occur in anatomically and physiologically normal heart. Accidental (innocent) murmurs have their own clearly defined clinical characteristics (asymptomatic, they require minimal follow-up care).To point out the significance of auscultation of the heart in the differentiation of heart murmurs and show clinical characteristics of accidental heart murmurs.Article presents review of literature which deals with the issue of accidental heart murmurs

2017 Medical Archives

5. Pulmonary stenosis

Pulmonary stenosis Pulmonary stenosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Pulmonary stenosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Mostly congenital. Symptoms ranging from none to profound cyanosis and the potential for sudden death. Systolic ejection murmur, loudest over left upper sternal border. Cyanotic patients treated with oxygen and prostaglandin E1 prior to diagnostic (...) testing. Diagnosis confirmed and severity classified by echocardiography. Mild pulmonary stenosis is a benign condition requiring sequential cardiac follow-up but no therapy; prophylaxis for infective endocarditis not recommended. Percutaneous balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty (PBPV) indicated in moderate to severe/critical lesions. Surgical valvotomy reserved for treatment failure and contraindication to PBPV. Definition Pulmonary stenosis (PS) obstructs the blood flow from the right ventricle (RV

2018 BMJ Best Practice

6. Heart Murmur

Shaped Murmur Pitch Low pitched Best heard with bell chest-piece at light pressure High pitched Best heard with diaphragm at firm pressure Dynamic Maneuvers Position Supine Erect Left lateral decubitus position III. Interpretation Benign murmur findings Murmur characteristics Crescendo-decrescend character Musical or vibratory murmur Quiet murmur (Grade 2 or less) Timing: Early systolic or mid Location: Left sternal border or pulmonic area Associated findings absent Cardiopulmonary symptoms absent (...) . Murmurs are characterized according to the area of generation (mitral, aortic, tricuspid, or pulmonary) and according to the period of the cycle (systolic or diastolic). Definition (MSH) Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc). Concepts

2018 FP Notebook

7. Pulmonary stenosis

Pulmonary stenosis Pulmonary stenosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Pulmonary stenosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Mostly congenital. Symptoms ranging from none to profound cyanosis and the potential for sudden death. Systolic ejection murmur, loudest over left upper sternal border. Cyanotic patients treated with oxygen and prostaglandin E1 prior to diagnostic (...) testing. Diagnosis confirmed and severity classified by echocardiography. Mild pulmonary stenosis is a benign condition requiring sequential cardiac follow-up but no therapy; prophylaxis for infective endocarditis not recommended. Percutaneous balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty (PBPV) indicated in moderate to severe/critical lesions. Surgical valvotomy reserved for treatment failure and contraindication to PBPV. Definition Pulmonary stenosis (PS) obstructs the blood flow from the right ventricle (RV

2017 BMJ Best Practice

8. Pulmonary embolism

% at 5 years, and 30% at 10 years. The frequency of recurrence does not appear to depend on the clinical presentation of the first event (that is, whether it was a DVT or PE), but recurrent VTE is likely to occur in the same clinical form as the first event [ ]. Diagnosis Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism When to suspect When should I suspect pulmonary embolism? Suspect pulmonary embolism (PE) in a person with dyspnoea, tachypnoea, pleuritic chest pain, and/or features of deep vein thrombosis (DVT (...) of acute pulmonary embolism: The Task Force for the Diagnosis and Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) [ ]. The symptoms and signs of pulmonary embolism (PE) are based on the NICE guidelines [ ; ]. In a study identified in the ESC guideline, the clinial characteristics of people with suspected (n = 528) and confirmed (n = 1880) PE in the emergency department were [ ]: Dyspnoea — 51% and 50%, respectively. Pleuritic chest pain — 28% and 39%, respectively

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

9. Chest pain

Chest pain Chest pain - NICE CKS Share Chest pain: Summary Chest pain refers to pain in the thorax. It can be classified by: Cause (such as cardiac or non-cardiac). Type (such as localized or poorly localized, pleuritic or non-pleuritic). Cardiac causes of chest pain include: Acute coronary syndrome (unstable angina and myocardial infarction). Stable angina. Other cardiac causes, such as dissecting thoracic aneurysm, pericarditis, cardiac tamponade, myocarditis, acute congestive cardiac failure (...) , or arrhythmias. Respiratory causes of chest pain include: Pulmonary embolus, pneumothorax or tension pneumothorax, community-acquired pneumonia, asthma, or pleural effusion. Other causes of chest pain include: Gastroenterological causes, such as acute pancreatitis, oesophageal rupture, peptic ulcer disease, gastro-oesophageal reflux, oesophageal spasm, or oesophagitis. Musculoskeletal causes, such as rib fracture, costochondritis, spinal disorders (disc prolapse, cervical spondylosis, facet joint dysfunction

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Very late presentation of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery: case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

have abundant, well-formed functioning collaterals with adequate perfusion of the left ventricle. We present the oldest reported patient with ALCAPA to undergo corrective surgery.A 79-year-old woman presented with a 3-months history of worsening shortness of breath and orthopnea. Physical examination discovered a soft continuous murmur at the left upper chest. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated an unusual, tubular-like structure inside the interventricular septum with a turbulent flow from (...) Very late presentation of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery: case report Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare congenital coronary anomaly. The enlarged right coronary artery provides retrograde collaterals to supply the left ventricle then preferentially directs into the lower pressure pulmonary artery system causing coronary steal phenomenon. Few patients who survive through adulthood without surgery must

2018 Journal of cardiothoracic surgery

11. Immature teratoma mimicking pulmonary stenosis: a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

with progressive exertional dyspnea. During a cardiac examination, an ejection systolic murmur was observed, and echocardiography findings at an Emergency Centre revealed high velocity flow at the level of the pulmonary artery, indicating pulmonary stenosis. He was hospitalized in our Cardiology Department for further investigation. A chest X-ray revealed a mediastinal mass, and repeated echocardiography indicated the presence of a large mediastinal mass compressing his main pulmonary artery. Magnetic (...) Immature teratoma mimicking pulmonary stenosis: a case report Immature teratoma in a mediastinal location is a rare disease that might present as a valve pathology. Germ cell tumors with mediastinal locations account for up to 6% of immature teratoma cases. We present a case of an immature teratoma located primarily in the anterior mediastinum that manifested solely through symptoms of pulmonary stenosis.We report a case of a 20-year-old white man with an immature teratoma who presented

2018 Journal of medical case reports

12. Ventricular septal perforation after blunt chest trauma due to blows from a fist Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ventricular septal perforation after blunt chest trauma due to blows from a fist A 40-year-old man received fist blows to his chest and abdomen. He presented with external jugular vein distention and facial congestion. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary congestion. A Levine V/VI holosystolic murmur was audible. Echocardiography showed left-to-right shunt flow across the perimembranous region of the ventricular septum. The diameter of the hole was approximately 13 mm. We diagnosed (...) chest trauma is a rare form of cardiac trauma. It is important to consider the timing of the operation and the best method to ensure cardiac repair.

2016 Acute medicine & surgery

13. Nature’s balancing act: Infective endocarditis of pulmonary valve with ventricular septal defect in fifth decade; a rare and unusual presentation Full Text available with Trip Pro

, which led to a complication, i.e. pulmonary valve endocarditis. A 45-year-old sick-looking man presented in medical emergency with fever and progressively increasing breathlessness for the previous 2 weeks. He had no significant past history. The patient was febrile and on cardiovascular (CVS) examination, ejection systolic murmur in left upper parasternal region was heard, suggesting a diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Echocardiography revealed subaortic VSD of 1.2 cm size with left to right (...) shunt. There was moderator band hypertrophy in sub-infundibular right ventricle (RVOT obstruction) creating obstruction to blood flow, thus preventing development of pulmonary artery hypertension. There were two large vegetations (4 × 3 mm) on each leaflet of pulmonary valve. High speed turbulent jet of blood generated from right ventricle obstruction was striking the pulmonary valve leaflets which led to injury and subsequent development of infective endocarditis of pulmonary valve. The patient

2017 Journal of cardiology cases

14. Heart Murmur

Shaped Murmur Pitch Low pitched Best heard with bell chest-piece at light pressure High pitched Best heard with diaphragm at firm pressure Dynamic Maneuvers Position Supine Erect Left lateral decubitus position III. Interpretation Benign murmur findings Murmur characteristics Crescendo-decrescend character Musical or vibratory murmur Quiet murmur (Grade 2 or less) Timing: Early systolic or mid Location: Left sternal border or pulmonic area Associated findings absent Cardiopulmonary symptoms absent (...) . Murmurs are characterized according to the area of generation (mitral, aortic, tricuspid, or pulmonary) and according to the period of the cycle (systolic or diastolic). Definition (MSH) Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc). Concepts

2015 FP Notebook

15. Right sided Austin Flint murmur

cases of pulmonary regurgitation in an old study by cardiac catheterization and phonocardiography [1]. All these patients had pulmonary hypertension. Right Sided Austin Flint Murmur The right sided Austin Flint murmur was thought to be due to functional tricuspid stenosis caused by the pulmonary regurgitation. The antegrade flow through a closing tricuspid valve due to pulmonary regurgitation was proposed as the reason for the murmur. A previous reports of right sided Austin Flint murmur documented (...) Right sided Austin Flint murmur Right sided Austin Flint murmur – All About Cardiovascular System and Disorders Now Trending: | December 11, 2015 | | Right sided Austin Flint murmur Classical Austin Flint murmur is a mid diastolic murmur in the mitral area heard in those with free aortic regurgitation. By similar analogy, a mid diastolic murmur in pulmonary regurgitation can be called a right sided Austin Flint murmur . Mid diastolic and presystolic murmurs could be demonstrated in 7 out of 14

2015 Cardiophile MD blog

16. My Dad’s Heart Murmur and The Botched Echocardiogram

My Dad’s Heart Murmur and The Botched Echocardiogram My Dad’s Heart Murmur and The Botched Echocardiogram | The Skeptical Cardiologist Primary Menu Search for: , My Dad’s Heart Murmur and The Botched Echocardiogram My dad was recently told he had a heart murmur by his internist. An echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart) was ordered. A heart murmur is basically any unusual sound that the doctor hears when he/she places a stethoscope on the anterior chest in the vicinity of the heart. Blood (...) flows across various valves as it makes its way through the cardiac chambers. If the valves are functioning normally we usually can’t hear anything because the blood velocity is low and the flow is not disordered. The majority of murmurs that are detected are due to either: (1) narrowing (stenosis) of a valve that results in an acceleration of blood velocity. (2) failure of a valve to close properly (insufficiency or regurgitation) and prevent back flow. Cardiologists have developed an absolutely

2015 The Skeptical Cardiologist

17. Peripheral Blood Flow Responses to Electromagnetic Energy

or speak English, a history of cancer, peripheral artery disease, diabetes mellitus, active pregnancy, hypersensitivity to perflutren contrast agents, pulmonary hypertension, chronic kidney disease, active tobacco or drug use, blood pressure over 160/90, BMI>30, sickle cell disease, or history of intracardiac shunt. Additional exclusion criteria include: a history of coronary artery disease, heart failure, the presence of an implanted defibrillator or pacemaker, a history of heart murmur or rhythm (...) Peripheral Blood Flow Responses to Electromagnetic Energy Peripheral Blood Flow Responses to Electromagnetic Energy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Peripheral Blood Flow Responses

2015 Clinical Trials

18. Thoracic Aortic Disease: Guidelines For the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With

Issues .e35 1.5. Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations Used Throughout Guideline .e35 2. The Thoracic Aorta .e36 2.1. The Normal Aorta .e36 2.2. Normal Thoracic Aortic Diameter .e36 3. Thoracic Aortic Histopathology .e37 3.1. Atherosclerosis .e37 3.2. Aneurysms and Dissections .e37 3.3. Vasculitis and In?ammatory Diseases. . . .e38 4. Imaging Modalities .e39 4.1. Recommendations for Aortic Imaging Techniques to Determine the Presence and Progression of Thoracic Aortic Disease . .e39 4.2. Chest X-Ray (...) e64 8.1.5.3. HEART FAILURE AND SHOCK...e64 8.1.5.4. PERICARDIAL EFFUSION AND TAMPONADE e64 8.1.6. Syncope .e64 8.1.7. Neurologic Complications .e65 8.1.8. Pulmonary Complications .e65 8.1.9. Gastrointestinal Complications .e65 8.1.10. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Considerations .e65 8.1.11. Age and Sex Considerations .e65 8.2. Intramural Hematoma .e66 8.3. Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcer .e67 8.4. Pseudoaneurysms of the Thoracic Aorta .e67 8.5. Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta.e67 8.6

2010 American College of Cardiology

19. Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Respiratory Physician Chairperson, Guidelines Development Group4 CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES: MANAGEMENT OF PULMONARY ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION (PAH) GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT AND OBJECTIVE GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT The development group for these guidelines consisted of cardiologists (adult and paediatric), pulmonologists, and cardio thoracic surgeons from the Ministry of Health and Institut Jantung Negara, Malaysia. This is the first edition of the PAH CPG. These guidelines have been issued in 2011 (...) Task Force ACCP = American College of Chest Physicians AHA = American Heart Association bd = twice-daily BMPR2 =bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II BNP = brain natriuretic peptide CCB = calcium channel blocker CHD = congenital heart disease CTD = connective tissue disease CTEPH = chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension CXR = chest X-ray DLCO = diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide EMEA = European Medicines Agency EGF = epidermal growth factor ERA = endothelin receptor antagonist ESC

2011 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

20. Thoracic Trauma (Follow-up)

, thoracoscopy can be effective in completely draining the pleural space and in removal of any organizing peel from the lung. [ ] Pneumothorax Pneumothorax may result from puncture of the lung by a rib, by a penetrating chest wall injury, by disruption of the pulmonary parenchyma, or by injury to the tracheobronchial tree. Neither simple pneumothorax nor tension pneumothorax is well tolerated in children because of the lack of fixation of the mediastinum. However, less than 15% of cases of childhood thoracic (...) because a path of less resistance is created for tracheobronchial air. To prevent this airflow, the wound must be covered and tube decompression must follow. Pulmonary contusion Pulmonary contusion is the most common thoracic injury in children and represents a defining contrast between children and adults. In contrast to rib fractures in adults after blunt trauma, the kinetic energy of blunt chest trauma is transmitted to the compliant chest wall in children. Thus, both pulmonary contusion

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

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