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Prevention of Waterborne Illness

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141. Identifying and Addressing the Daily Needs of Contacts of an Ebola Patient During Investigation, Monitoring, and Movement Restriction, Ohio Full Text available with Trip Pro

, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, Atlanta, GA, USA. Erme Marguerite M Summit County Public Health, Akron, OH, USA. Kippes Chris C Cuyahoga County Board of Health, Parma, OH, USA. Quinn Kim K Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, OH, USA. de Fijter Sietske S Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, OH, USA. DiOrio Mary M Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, OH, USA. Braden Christopher C Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, Atlanta, GA (...) Identifying and Addressing the Daily Needs of Contacts of an Ebola Patient During Investigation, Monitoring, and Movement Restriction, Ohio 28123205 2018 01 05 2018 11 13 1468-2877 131 5 2016 09 Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974) Public Health Rep Identifying and Addressing the Daily Needs of Contacts of an Ebola Patient During Investigation, Monitoring, and Movement Restriction, Ohio. 661-665 10.1177/0033354916660087 McCarty Carolyn L CL Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

2016 Public Health Reports

142. Authors’ correction for Euro Surveill. 2016;21(46) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Authors’ correction for Euro Surveill. 2016;21(46) 27922449 2017 04 17 2018 04 17 1560-7917 21 47 2016 11 24 Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin Euro Surveill. Authors' correction for Euro Surveill. 2016;21(46). 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.47.30404 30404 Eurosurveillance editorial team European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden. eng Journal Article Published Erratum Sweden Euro (...) Surveill 100887452 1025-496X Euro Surveill. 2016 Nov 17;21(46): 27918256 Mycobacterium chimaera device-associated infections patient safety waterborne infections 2016 12 7 6 0 2016 12 7 6 0 2016 12 7 6 1 ppublish 27922449 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.47.30404 30404 PMC5291143

2016 Eurosurveillance

143. Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with heater-cooler units (HCU): closing another loophole in patient safety Full Text available with Trip Pro

Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden. Plachouras Diamantis D European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden. eng Editorial Sweden Euro Surveill 100887452 1025-496X IM Euro Surveill. 2016 Nov 24;21(47): 27922449 Cross Infection etiology Equipment Contamination Humans Mycobacterium isolation & purification Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous etiology Patient Safety Surgical Equipment microbiology Water Microbiology Mycobacterium chimaera (...) Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with heater-cooler units (HCU): closing another loophole in patient safety 27918256 2017 04 17 2018 11 13 1560-7917 21 46 2016 Nov 17 Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin Euro Surveill. Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with heater-cooler units (HCU): closing another loophole in patient safety. 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.46.30397 30397 Struelens Marc J MJ European

2016 Eurosurveillance

144. Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and his World Mercury Project: Antivaccine, NOT “fiercely pro-vaccine”

exist, long enough to assure him that complications of vaccination that have never been demonstrated for any vaccine (autism, neurodevelopment disorders, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, other chronic diseases) do not occur. From a scientific, ethical, and financial standpoint, what RFK Jr. is advocating is an intentionally unreasonable standard. Basically, : Here are the facts: One in every 2 American children (54%) are chronically ill One in every 6 American children (15%) has a developmental (...) of those diseases. 1 in 2 US children are chronically ill??? Really? Where are these children? I’m obviously only seeing the non-chronically ill kids, because most of my daughters’ friends with children have healthy, UTD vaccinated kids with no chronic illnesses. I know. He’s raising $50,000. For what he wants to do, that’s not a lot of money. It’s also not a lot of money compared to the Kennedy family wealth. If RFK Jr. were truly sincere, wouldn’t he take some of his wealth and do what other wealthy

2017 Respectful Insolence

145. Bridget Seng: Yemen’s cholera crisis—a sliver of hope but more needs to be done

discussed the vicious cycle entrapping the Yemenis, and the specific challenges that Yemen’s healthcare infrastructure and workforce face. Rachel explained how the current cholera outbreak is a symptom of the conflict, but it is also a failure of preparedness—by both national and international health actors. Cholera is a predictable and preventable disease and can be controlled with very basic public health and “WASH” (water sanitation and hygiene) activities. However, as Nawal noted, the current (...) approach to dealing with Yemen’s civil war and cholera crisis has been a reactive one—too slow and too late. Cholera is a waterborne disease, which means that unless contaminated water and infected food sources are treated, the disease will continue to persist in communities relying on the infected sources. In the documentary, Nawal travels to rural areas to show that this is exactly what is happening in Yemen: after getting treatment, patients are left without any choice but to continue consuming

2017 The BMJ Blog

146. Safety Tips Every Contact Lens Wearer Should Know

updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Safety Tips Every Contact Lens Wearer Should Know Posted on August 18, 2017 by Jennifer Cope, MD, MPH, Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Are you one of the 45 million people in the United States who wear contact lenses to correct your vision? Eye infections related to improper contact lens wear and care are serious and can lead to long-lasting damage (...) program, and supports epidemiologic, laboratory, and communication activities related to free-living ameba infections. She also works with the CDC to raise awareness of contact-lens-related eye infections and the healthy habits that can reduce your chances of getting an eye infection. Posted on August 18, 2017 by Jennifer Cope, MD, MPH, Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Categories , , Tags , , , , , , , 3 comments on “Safety Tips Every

2017 CDC Public Health Matters

147. WEO/WGO Guidelines on endoscope disinfection: a resource-sensitive approach

. Table 1 Endoscope processing: general principles applying to all levels of resources Step General recommendations Precleaning • Preclean immediately Cleaning • Always perform leak testing and block testing before immersing the endoscope in a detergent or soap solution, as this may help prevent expensive repairs later Rinsing • Always rinse between cleaning and disinfection Disinfection • Always immerse the endoscope and valves in a disinfectant solution of proven efficacy (see below) • Always (...) by the manufacturer Final rinsing • Always discard the rinse water after each use to avoid concentration of the disinfectant and thus damage to mucosa • Never use the same container for the first and final rinsing Drying • Always dry the endoscope properly before storage to prevent microorganism growth in the endoscope channels Storage • Never store in a transport container 1.3 WGO cascades—a resource-sensitive approach A gold standard approach is feasible in regions and countries in which the full range

2011 World Endoscopy Organization

148. Endoscope Disinfection - a Resource-Sensitive Approach

principles applying to all levels of resources Step General recommendations Precleaning • Preclean immediately Cleaning • Always perform leak testing and block testing before immersing the endoscope in a detergent or soap solution, as this may help prevent expensive repairs later Rinsing • Always rinse between cleaning and disinfection Disinfection • Always immerse the endoscope and valves in a disinfectant solution of proven efficacy (see below) • Always irrigate all channels with a syringe until air (...) water after each use to avoid concentration of the disinfectant and thus damage to mucosa • Never use the same container for the first and final rinsing Drying • Always dry the endoscope properly before storage to prevent microorganism growth in the endoscope channels Storage • Never store in a transport container 1.3 WGO cascades—a resource-sensitive approach A gold standard approach is feasible in regions and countries in which the full range of options is available for endoscope disinfection

2011 World Gastroenterology Organisation

149. Andrew Wakefield claims “natural Herd Immunity” is better than anything vaccines can do, never mind all that suffering

that getting sick is morbidity! Seriously, if you get sick with measles, even if you recover (as the vast majority do), you have suffered significant morbidity, and if there’s a vaccine suffering that morbidity is potentially preventable! Basically, Wakefield redefines morbidity as only permanent sequelae to make this deeply dishonest argument. I could much more reasonably define morbidity as being ill with vaccine-preventable disease (because that is morbidity, albeit temporary) and point out that, since (...) of student guest posts for my class on infectious causes of chronic disease. First one this year is by Dana Lowry. Humans have a long history of illness and death from infectious diseases. It wasn’t until the 1790s that we had a solution. Edward Jenner… If you want to know the single most important class of public health interventions with respect to infectious diseases in the 20th century it wasn't vaccines but provision of clean water and food supplies. But vaccines may be next. With major waterborne

2016 Respectful Insolence

150. Catching up with the Authors: Aurélie Jeandron and Ayse Ercumen on Clean Water Supply in the DRC and India

Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized Source: AddThis Sharing Buttons above Last October PLOS Medicine published two research articles from separate groups investigating the association between continuous clean water supply and waterborne diseases. found that interruptions to the piped water supply to Ulvira, a town in Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) were followed (...) . It is expected to significantly improve the town’s access to drinking water by 2018 and thereby potentially reduce cholera and other diarrhoeal diseases incidence. One goal of the project was to improve the reliability of the tap water supply by building a hydro-electric generator to prevent the frequent power cuts that prevent treated water being pumped through the system. Further engineering plans, however, determined that the geological setting was inappropriate to build a small dam at an affordable cost

2016 PLOS Blogs Network

151. Does Food Handler Training Improve Food Safety?

individual reports of illness associated with food or water (7). According to a 2003 Peel Public Health report on food-borne disease, there was a general decline in the incidence of the most common food-borne diseases between 1993 and 2002 (1). b) Reasons behind the push for mandatory food handler training in Ontario The Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors, Ontario Chapter (CIPHI) has been calling on the Ontario Government for a number of years to amend the O. Reg. 562 (Food Premises) to make (...) themselves as not working in the food service industry. 1.2 Literature Review A conceptual model (see Appendix A) was designed with Peel public health inspectors to show what interventions (food safety training, inspections, etc) the health department can use to prevent food-borne illness within the context of the entire food safety system. Research Question The question that was used to guide this literature review was: Does food handler training improve food safety? A Critical Appraisal

2011 Peel Health Library

152. Water systems, sanitation, and public health risks in remote communities: Inuit resident perspectives from the Canadian Arctic. (Abstract)

human exposure to waterborne health risks were also found to exist and may be increasing in the settlements. While water and wastewater system design decisions are often based on best practices proven suitable in similar environmental conditions, this study reinforces the argument for inclusion of social, cultural, and economic variables in such decisions, particularly in remote and economically challenged contexts in Canada or elsewhere around the world. The results also indicate that the addition (...) Water systems, sanitation, and public health risks in remote communities: Inuit resident perspectives from the Canadian Arctic. Safe drinking water and wastewater sanitation are universally recognized as critical components of public health. It is well documented that a lack of access to these basic services results in millions of preventable deaths each year among vulnerable populations. Water and wastewater technologies and management practices are frequently tailored to local environmental

2015 Social Science & Medicine

153. Assessing the contributions of an academic health department for a school of public health in New York State Full Text available with Trip Pro

and Biostatistics, and is currently the Associate Director for Food Safety, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia. Morse Dale D Millicent Eidson is a Research Scientist with the NYSDOH Office of Public Health Practice and an Associate Professor in the UA-SPH Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, both in Albany, New York. Eva Pradhan is a Research (...) Scientist with the NYSDOH Cancer Registry in Albany. Dale Morse was the former Assistant Commissioner of Science at the NYSDOH and former Chair and Professor in the UA-SPH Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and is currently the Associate Director for Food Safety, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia. eng Journal Article United States

2014 Public Health Reports

154. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the proportion of Campylobacter cases that develop chronic sequelae Full Text available with Trip Pro

language studies is recommended and consistent diagnostic approaches and case definitions need to be implemented and reported in future research. Abbreviations AGI: Acute gastrointestinal illness REA: Reactive arthritis RS: Reiter’s syndrome HUS: Haemolytic uraemic syndrome IBS: Irritable bowel syndrome IBD: Inflammatory bowel disease GBS: Guillain Barré syndrome MFS: Miller Fisher syndrome ONBOIDS: Ontario Burden of Infectious Disease Study UC: Ulcerative colitis Crohn’s: Crohn’s disease. References 1 (...) (ReA), Reiter’s syndrome (RS), haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ,Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS) or Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) were included. Data extraction through independent extraction of articles by four reviewers (two per article). Random effects meta-analysis was performed and heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 value. Meta-regression was used to explore the influence of study level variables on heterogeneity. Results

2014 BMC public health

155. Everyone Needs Somewhere to Go: World Toilet Day

services by 2030, making sanitation a global development priority. To raise awareness of this issue, the United Nations General Assembly designated November 19 as . The Center for Global Health’s Emergency Response and Recovery Branch ( ) , with support from the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious DiseasesWaterborne Disease Prevention Branch ( ), joined the United Nations and other development partners to reach the Sustainable Development Goal by evaluating the safety (...) for health, human dignity, and improved education. Sadly, 2.3 billion people lack even a basic sanitation service, which in many ways represents an ongoing public health crisis that puts much of the world’s population at risk for diseases such as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis, and typhoid fever. Almost 1 billion face the indignity every day of defecating outside without privacy. The 2015 include a target to ensure universal access to adequate and equitable sanitation and use of safely managed sanitation

2017 CDC Our Global Voices

156. The Consequences of Contaminated Water

, enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button The Consequences of Contaminated Water Posted on March 21, 2017 by Adrienne Lefevre, MPH, CHES Thank you to CDC’s Rick Gelting, Tom Handzel and Eric Mintz for their assistance in writing this story. March 22 is World Water Day. CDC highlights the need for all people to have access to safe water, and to prevent sickness and death from waterborne diseases such as cholera World Water Day We all remember when a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck (...) for all people to have access to safe water, and to prevent sickness and death from waterborne diseases such as cholera. Dr. Brinel, formerly part of the Field Epidemiology Training Program, learns how to collect stool samples to test them for cholera in October 2016 in Haiti (Photo courtesy of Coralie Giese) Cholera persists in Haiti primarily because many people lack access to clean water and proper sanitation. CDC continues to work with partners to improve access to safe water, such as increasing

2017 CDC Our Global Voices

157. Parasitologist for the People

see rapid spread of infectious disease. When there is famine, those affected have a compromised immune system, allowing them to contract illnesses easier. For these reasons it is vital that public health staff from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is on the scene. While we cannot always control the causes and breadth of these emergencies, we can minimize the negative public health impact. CDC experts have served those most affected by emergencies for many years. CDC promotes (...) , a vital public health issue. Our world’s water crises necessitate experts who can address waterborne diseases and sanitation issues that threaten the public’s health. Even though the hours are long and exhausting, Alaine is happy to answer the call to action, “In the US we have the knowledge and tools to protect ourselves and our families from many diseases. However, outside the US, obstacles to health and quality of life are often related to challenges in accessing safe drinking water

2017 CDC Our Global Voices

158. Bridges and roads are also important to your health

are not the only situations where fractures in infrastructure impact health. In Uganda – a country with a high prevalence of preventable and treatable illnesses, such as respiratory infections – the is a matter of life and death. While effective, low-cost treatments exist, the leading causes of childhood mortality include pneumonia, malaria and diarrheal diseases. As in the U.S., rural children in Uganda are at a greater risk of death than those living in cities. In fact, children living in the rural northeast (...) technologies shore up , including the delivery of medications and other health supplies, other areas of infrastructure are not only deteriorating but also do not address imminent, or recurring, public health threats. I fear that America is slowly returning to its status in the early 19th century as a developing nation. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, cities throughout the U.S. eradicated the spread of waterborne diseases, such as typhoid, by investing in . However, as the Flint water crisis of 2014

2017 KevinMD blog

159. Cyclospora

Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Cyclosporiasis (C0343398) Definition (MSH) Infection with parasitic protozoa of the genus CYCLOSPORA. It is distributed globally and causes a diarrheal illness. Transmission is waterborne. Concepts Disease or Syndrome ( T047 ) MSH ICD9 007.5 ICD10 SnomedCT 240372001 LNC LA10449-9 English Cyclosporiasis , cyclosporiasis , cyclosporiasis (diagnosis) , Cyclosporiasis [Disease/Finding] , Cyclosporiases , Cyclosporiasis (disorder) Dutch cyclosporiase , Cyclosporiasis (...) Cyclospora Cyclospora Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Cyclospora Cyclospora Aka: Cyclospora , Cyclosporiasis

2016 FP Notebook

160. Pneumonia, Community-Acquired (Overview)

infiltrates, and shock in the absence of conditions associated with hyposplenism should be evaluated for imitators of pneumonia, such as acute myocardial infarction or acute . Conditions that predispose to severe CAP should be considered in patients presenting with CAP and shock in the absence of one of the aforementioned cardiopulmonary diseases. The following disorders and therapies have been associated with severe CAP: Chronic alcoholism Amyloidosis Chronic active hepatitis Hyposplenism in elderly (...) in individuals with comorbid factors such as underlying cardiopulmonary disease, diminished splenic function, and/or heightened pathogenic virulence. Even in young and/or healthy hosts, severe CAP can develop if the causative pathogen is sufficiently virulent. For example, , ( ), ( ), and Legionnaires disease may present as severe CAP. [ , , , ] Patients with severe CAP should have the benefit of an infectious disease specialist to assist in the underlying cause of their condition. Complications associated

2014 eMedicine.com

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