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Prevention of Waterborne Illness

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101. Consistency of Use and Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment among Indian Households Claiming to Treat Their Water. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Consistency of Use and Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment among Indian Households Claiming to Treat Their Water. Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by populations at risk. Current international monitoring estimates by the Joint Monitoring Programme for water and sanitation suggest that at least 1.1 billion people practice HWT. These estimates, however, are based on surveys that may overstate the level (...) to waterborne diseases.

2017 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

102. Naegleria fowleri infections Full Text available with Trip Pro

Naegleria fowleri infections 28501613 2018 01 23 2018 12 02 1873-0442 20 2017 Nov - Dec Travel medicine and infectious disease Travel Med Infect Dis Naegleria fowleri infections. 65 S1477-8939(17)30078-9 10.1016/j.tmaid.2017.05.007 Linam W Matthew WM Pediatric Infectious Diseases Section, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, AR, United States. Electronic address: wlinam@uams.edu. Cope Jennifer R JR Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta

2017 Travel medicine and infectious disease

103. Proteomic and genetic analysis of S. cerevisiae response to soluble copper leads to improvement of antimicrobial function of cellulosic copper nanoparticles Full Text available with Trip Pro

Proteomic and genetic analysis of S. cerevisiae response to soluble copper leads to improvement of antimicrobial function of cellulosic copper nanoparticles Copper (Cu) was used in antiquity to prevent waterborne and food diseases because, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, it generates reactive oxygen species, ROS. New technologies incorporating Cu into low-cost biodegradable nanomaterials built on cellulose, known as cellulosic cupric nanoparticles or c-CuNPs, present novel approaches

2017 Metallomics : integrated biometal science

104. Treating cholera in severely malnourished children in the Horn of Africa and Yemen Full Text available with Trip Pro

@cdc.gov. Narra Rupa R Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. eng CC999999 Intramural CDC HHS United States Letter 2017 10 05 England Lancet 2985213R 0140-6736 0 Anti-Bacterial Agents AIM IM Anti-Bacterial Agents administration & dosage Child Child, Preschool Cholera diagnosis epidemiology therapy Combined Modality Therapy Comorbidity Developing Countries (...) Treating cholera in severely malnourished children in the Horn of Africa and Yemen 28988791 2018 09 28 2018 12 07 1474-547X 390 10106 2017 Oct 28 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Treating cholera in severely malnourished children in the Horn of Africa and Yemen. 1945-1946 S0140-6736(17)32601-6 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32601-6 Ververs Mija M Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. Electronic address: mververs

2017 Lancet (London, England)

105. Simultaneous Molecular Detection of Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora from Raw Vegetables in Korea Full Text available with Trip Pro

Simultaneous Molecular Detection of Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora from Raw Vegetables in Korea Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora are well-known coccidian protozoa that can cause waterborne and foodborne diarrheal illnesses. There have been a few reports regarding contamination in different vegetables with Cryptosporidium, but no data are available regarding the sources of Cyclospora infections in Korea. In the present study, we collected 6 kinds of vegetables (perilla leaves, winter-grown (...) for the first time in Korea. This suggests that screening should be employed to prevent these protozoal infections in Korea.

2017 The Korean journal of parasitology

106. Towards interruption of schistosomiasis transmission in sub-Saharan Africa: developing an appropriate environmental surveillance framework to guide and to support ‘end game’ interventions Full Text available with Trip Pro

Towards interruption of schistosomiasis transmission in sub-Saharan Africa: developing an appropriate environmental surveillance framework to guide and to support ‘end game’ interventions Schistosomiasis is a waterborne parasitic disease in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly common in rural populations living in impoverished conditions. With the scale-up of preventive chemotherapy, national campaigns will transition from morbidity- to transmission-focused interventions thus formal

2017 Infectious diseases of poverty

107. State Laws Requiring Hand Sanitation Stations at Animal Contact Exhibits—United States, March–April 2016 Full Text available with Trip Pro

State Laws Requiring Hand Sanitation Stations at Animal Contact Exhibits—United States, March–April 2016 In the United States, animal contact exhibits, such as petting zoos and agricultural fairs, have been sources of zoonotic infections, including infections with Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Cryptosporidium (1-4). The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians recommends handwashing after contact with animals as an effective prevention measure to disease transmission (...) at these exhibits (4). This report provides a list of states that have used law, specifically statutes and regulations, as public health interventions to increase hand sanitation at animal contact exhibits. The report is based on an assessment conducted by CDC's Public Health Law Program, in collaboration with the Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases in CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. The assessment found that seven states have used statutes

2017 MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report

108. Promoting access to and use of clean and safe water to stop hepatitis E

and the use of narrow neck containers to prevent contamination. Most importantly, we recommended to increase latrine construction in the informal areas to decrease open defecation. We at CDC work in partnership with countries and organizations worldwide to strengthen capacity to provide safely treated water, monitor waterborne disease outbreaks, and ensure access to water for the most vulnerable. Everyone should have the chance to lead a healthy life, and we can help people achieve this through promoting (...) organizations to respond to international disasters, disease outbreaks, and humanitarian crises. In September of 2017, Namibia began reporting sporadic cases of acute jaundice, abdominal pain, and fatigue. These cases were later confirmed to be due to the hepatitis E virus, and by December 2017, the Namibian Ministry of Health and Social Services declared an outbreak of hepatitis E. Hepatitis E is an enteric disease, meaning that it is caused by an intestinal infection. Because it is often found in water

2019 CDC Our Global Voices

109. Family Practice Notebook Updates 2017

in early pregnancy Newborn (neonatal abstinence syndrome) if maternal use No evidence of safety (gi, esophagus) Immune mediated esophagitis ( of the esophagus) that does not respond to management May present with solid , food impaction, anterior , and refractory Strongly associated with allergic conditions If management ineffective, try activating steroid MDI (e.g. HFA) and swallowing, not inhaling IV. Updates: October 2017 (geri, prevent) Approach falls as a sentinel event, a predictor of future falls (...) (pharm, alternative) s may either be pharmacokinetic ( Mechanism) or pharmacodynamic (direct effects) Pharmacokinetic ( Mechanism) are related to competition for enzyme activity (CYP, P-g, UGT, OATP) at highest risk for include Goldenseal and (prevent, exam) All s should have screening exam within first 30 days of U.S. arfrival Test or empirically treat for endemic diseases if not already tested (e.g. , intestinal s) Evaluate chronic health conditions (e.g. ) Evaluate for mental health conditions

2018 FP Notebook

110. Parasitic Infection

Diagnosis See See See See See See X. Labs See specific agents See (includes lab testing) with differential May demonstrate XI. Complications: Organisms with serious secondary effects species ( ) species ( ) Diphyllobothirum latum (Fish ) ( ) Plasmodium species ( ) - ( ) species ( ) Plasmodium species ( ) (Threadworm) ( ) Trichinella species (Trichinosis roundworm) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) Gastrointestinal Conditions See Disorder ( ) ( ) species ( ) XII. Prevention See See See See See See XIII. Resources (...) Parasitic Infection Parasitic Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Parasitic Infection Parasitic Infection Aka

2018 FP Notebook

111. Cyclospora

Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Cyclosporiasis (C0343398) Definition (MSH) Infection with parasitic protozoa of the genus CYCLOSPORA. It is distributed globally and causes a diarrheal illness. Transmission is waterborne. Concepts Disease or Syndrome ( T047 ) MSH ICD9 007.5 ICD10 SnomedCT 240372001 LNC LA10449-9 English Cyclosporiasis , cyclosporiasis , cyclosporiasis (diagnosis) , Cyclosporiasis [Disease/Finding] , Cyclosporiases , Cyclosporiasis (disorder) Dutch cyclosporiase , Cyclosporiasis (...) Cyclospora Cyclospora Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Cyclospora Cyclospora Aka: Cyclospora , Cyclosporiasis

2018 FP Notebook

112. Family Practice Notebook Updates 2017

in early pregnancy Newborn (neonatal abstinence syndrome) if maternal use No evidence of safety (gi, esophagus) Immune mediated esophagitis ( of the esophagus) that does not respond to management May present with solid , food impaction, anterior , and refractory Strongly associated with allergic conditions If management ineffective, try activating steroid MDI (e.g. HFA) and swallowing, not inhaling IV. Updates: October 2017 (geri, prevent) Approach falls as a sentinel event, a predictor of future falls (...) (pharm, alternative) s may either be pharmacokinetic ( Mechanism) or pharmacodynamic (direct effects) Pharmacokinetic ( Mechanism) are related to competition for enzyme activity (CYP, P-g, UGT, OATP) at highest risk for include Goldenseal and (prevent, exam) All s should have screening exam within first 30 days of U.S. arfrival Test or empirically treat for endemic diseases if not already tested (e.g. , intestinal s) Evaluate chronic health conditions (e.g. ) Evaluate for mental health conditions

2018 FP Notebook

113. Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis Leptospirosis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Leptospirosis Leptospirosis Aka: Leptospirosis (...) , Leptospira , Leptospira interrogans , Leptospira biflexa , Weil's Disease From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Worldwide: Common United States: 100-200/year (underestimated) Hawaii accounts for 50% of cases III. Pathophysiology Fresh-waterborne (Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira biflexa and 14 other species) Transmission Passed via infected animals urine Rats (most common) Livestock (e.g. horses, cattle, sheeps, goats) Dogs (often asymptomatic) Leptospira remains viable for months in water and soil

2018 FP Notebook

114. Water Disinfection

Disinfection , Waterborne Illness Prevention , Prevention of Waterborne Illness , Water Filtration , Halogenation II. Methods: Boiling Water sterilized at onset of boiling III. Methods: Pasteurization Cleans, but does not sterilize water Six log reduction in organisms Protocols Heat at 185 degrees F for 20 seconds Heat at 145 degrees F for 30 minutes IV. Methods: Filtration Pore size dependent Agent dependent <.2 micron < 1 micron particles (as small as .0004 micron) Avoid sediment Clogs filters, harbors (...) Water Disinfection Water Disinfection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Water Disinfection Water Disinfection Aka: Water

2018 FP Notebook

115. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

of colonoscopy, and the patients agreed to complete a standard questionnaire regarding the use of analgesics and low-dose aspirin (for prevention of cardiovascular disease). Stool samples were thawed within a median of 4 days after arrival at the central laboratory (shipped frozen from the recipient clinics). Fecal occult blood levels were measured by two automated FIT tests according to the manufacturer’s instructions (RIDASCREEN Haemoglobin and RIDASCREEN Haemo-/Haptoglobin Complex, r-biopharm, Bensheim (...) ): ; 2002-. Search term Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®) Health Professional Version PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board . Published online: March 17, 2020. This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about colorectal cancer screening. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

116. Help Your Patients Make Safer Food Choices

address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Help Your Patients Make Safer Food Choices Posted on September 26, 2018 by CDC's Safe Healthcare Blog Dr. Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH, Director of the Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Every year, an estimated 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases. Salmonella and Campylobacter, two of the many types of bacteria that are commonly transmitted (...) through food, can cause antibiotic-resistant infections. As physicians, we can help patients protect themselves against foodborne illness by talking with them about their risk. Although anyone can get a foodborne disease, some groups have a higher risk for illness or severe disease. These groups are: Children under age 5 Pregnant women Adults 65 and older Immunocompromised patients Talk with your high-risk patients or their caregivers about the risks of certain foods and how to avoid foodborne illness

2018 CDC Safe Healthcare blog

117. Preparing for a Hurricane or Tropical Storm

Storm Posted on August 21, 2018 by Blog Administrator You can’t stop a tropical storm or hurricane, but you can take steps now to protect you and your family. If you live in areas at risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages you to begin preparing for hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year. Please follow these important hurricane preparedness tips from CDC: : Take basic steps now to ensure your safety should a storm hit (...) safely. After you have read these tips, please review the other resources available on the website. You can also check out CDC’s new reference document that contains key messages on hurricane and flood related health threats. The can help local responders quickly create and adapt health communication products for affected communities. The document contains messages on various topics including food safety, carbon monoxide poisoning, waterborne diseases, and mold. CDC strongly recommends that you print

2018 CDC Your Health - Your Environment Blog

118. Safety Tips Every Contact Lens Wearer Should Know

updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Safety Tips Every Contact Lens Wearer Should Know Posted on August 18, 2017 by Jennifer Cope, MD, MPH, Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Are you one of the 45 million people in the United States who wear contact lenses to correct your vision? Eye infections related to improper contact lens wear and care are serious and can lead to long-lasting damage (...) program, and supports epidemiologic, laboratory, and communication activities related to free-living ameba infections. She also works with the CDC to raise awareness of contact-lens-related eye infections and the healthy habits that can reduce your chances of getting an eye infection. Posted on August 18, 2017 by Jennifer Cope, MD, MPH, Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Categories , , Tags , , , , , , , 3 comments on “Safety Tips Every

2017 CDC Public Health Matters

119. Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and his World Mercury Project: Antivaccine, NOT “fiercely pro-vaccine”

exist, long enough to assure him that complications of vaccination that have never been demonstrated for any vaccine (autism, neurodevelopment disorders, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, other chronic diseases) do not occur. From a scientific, ethical, and financial standpoint, what RFK Jr. is advocating is an intentionally unreasonable standard. Basically, : Here are the facts: One in every 2 American children (54%) are chronically ill One in every 6 American children (15%) has a developmental (...) of those diseases. 1 in 2 US children are chronically ill??? Really? Where are these children? I’m obviously only seeing the non-chronically ill kids, because most of my daughters’ friends with children have healthy, UTD vaccinated kids with no chronic illnesses. I know. He’s raising $50,000. For what he wants to do, that’s not a lot of money. It’s also not a lot of money compared to the Kennedy family wealth. If RFK Jr. were truly sincere, wouldn’t he take some of his wealth and do what other wealthy

2017 Respectful Insolence

120. Bridget Seng: Yemen’s cholera crisis—a sliver of hope but more needs to be done

discussed the vicious cycle entrapping the Yemenis, and the specific challenges that Yemen’s healthcare infrastructure and workforce face. Rachel explained how the current cholera outbreak is a symptom of the conflict, but it is also a failure of preparedness—by both national and international health actors. Cholera is a predictable and preventable disease and can be controlled with very basic public health and “WASH” (water sanitation and hygiene) activities. However, as Nawal noted, the current (...) approach to dealing with Yemen’s civil war and cholera crisis has been a reactive one—too slow and too late. Cholera is a waterborne disease, which means that unless contaminated water and infected food sources are treated, the disease will continue to persist in communities relying on the infected sources. In the documentary, Nawal travels to rural areas to show that this is exactly what is happening in Yemen: after getting treatment, patients are left without any choice but to continue consuming

2017 The BMJ Blog

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