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4,384 results for

Potassium Replacement

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4381. Effects of dietary sodium substitution with potassium and magnesium in hypertensive type II diabetics: a randomised blind controlled parallel study. (Abstract)

Effects of dietary sodium substitution with potassium and magnesium in hypertensive type II diabetics: a randomised blind controlled parallel study. We have previously demonstrated that modest sodium restriction has a hypotensive effect in hypertensive diabetic subjects. A randomised blind controlled study has therefore been performed to study the effect of replacement of added salt intake using a salt substitute (50% NaCl, 40% KCL, 10% Mg2+, supplied by Cederroth, Sweden), compared to added (...) or insulin levels or diabetic control (measured by glycosylated haemoglobin). A greater number of patients were withdrawn during the study period owing to consistent BP > 160/95 in the whole salt group (n = 10) compared to salt substitute (n = 4). No significant changes were observed in diastolic pressure, 24-h urine sodium or magnesium excretion, but urine potassium was significantly increased in the salt substitute group (58.8 to 77.3: P < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that substitution

1996 Journal of human hypertension Controlled trial quality: uncertain

4382. Can potassium citrate replace sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride of oral rehydration solution? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Can potassium citrate replace sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride of oral rehydration solution? Ninety four children aged less than 5 years with diarrhoeal dehydration and acidosis were treated randomly with either World Health Organisation (WHO) oral rehydration solution containing sodium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and glucose or an oral solution with tripotassium citrate monohydrate replacing the sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride in the WHO solution. Fifty (...) compared with children receiving WHO solution after 24 and 48 hours' treatment. None developed hyperkalaemia. Although children receiving potassium citrate solution corrected their acidosis at a slower rate than the WHO solution group during the first 24 hours, by 48 hours satisfactory correction was observed in all. Tripotassium citrate can safely replace sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride and may be the most useful and beneficial treatment for diarrhoea and associated hypokalaemia.

1985 Archives of disease in childhood Controlled trial quality: uncertain

4383. Potassium substitution via the oral route: does its efficacy depend on the anion of the potassium salt? (Abstract)

Potassium substitution via the oral route: does its efficacy depend on the anion of the potassium salt? In an open, randomized study, we investigated the effect of oral potassium chloride (KCl) and of potassium citrate/bicarbonate (K-cit/bic) in 42 patients with hypokalemia (less than or equal to 3.5 mmol/l). In both groups 80 mmol K+ were administered daily. The parameters examined were serum potassium concentration, acid-base status, and urinary electrolyte excretion. Parameters were

1991 Klinische Wochenschrift Controlled trial quality: uncertain

4384. [Potassium substitution during coronary surgery: K(+)-Mg+(+)-aspartate-complex (Inzolen) versus potassium chloride]. (Abstract)

[Potassium substitution during coronary surgery: K(+)-Mg+(+)-aspartate-complex (Inzolen) versus potassium chloride]. Potassium loss may cause arrhythmias and cardiac injury in patients undergoing heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In a prospective, randomized trial two different methods of potassium substitution were investigated regarding their influence on cardiac rhythm following reperfusion. Patients received either potassium chloride (Group I, n = 102) or potassium magnesium (...) perioperative myocardial infarction was diagnosed based on ECG and CK-MB findings. One patient in each group died during the postoperative hospital stay. At the time of declamping mean serum potassium concentration was 4.9 +/- 0.7 mmol/l in group I and 4.8 +/- 0.5 mmol/l in group II (n.s.). The concentration of magnesium was significantly lower in the potassium chloride substitution group (1.48 mmol/l) compared to the other group (2.33 mmol/l) (p < 0.05). No significant differences in cardiac electric

1993 Anaesthesiologie und Reanimation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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