How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,480 results for

Postpartum Office Visit

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1381. Cranial Diabetes Insipidus

- sarcoidosis, tuberculosis (TB), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis), histiocytosis. Infections - encephalitis, meningitis, cerebral abscess. Vascular disorders - haemorrhage/thrombosis, aneurysms, sickle cell disease, Sheehan's syndrome (postpartum pituitary necrosis). Post-radiotherapy. Inherited: Autosomal recessive combination of DI, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness (DIDMOAD) - Wolfram's syndrome. [ ] Autosomal dominant mutations of vasopressin gene. Nephrogenic DI (...) Acquired nephrogenic DI : Idiopathic. Hypokalaemia. Hypercalcaemia. Chronic kidney disease. Other metabolic derangements. Drugs - eg, ofloxacin, orlistat, lithium. [ ] Renal tubular acidosis. Pregnancy (combined renal hyposensitivity to ADH, increased placental elimination of ADH, lowered thirst threshold and effect of fluid retention). [ ] Post-obstructive uropathy. Congenital/genetic nephrogenic DI : X-linked mutation in V2 ADH-receptor gene. [ ] Autosomal recessive defect in aquaporin 2 (AQP2) gene

2008 Mentor

1382. Abnormal Menstruation

, which usually occurs 16-32 hours after the surge begins. The LH level falls a couple of days later. The oestrogen level from the ovaries increases gradually towards ovulation and peaks during the LH surge. The progesterone level starts to rise towards follicle release, preparing the endometrial lining of the uterus for implantation. Post-ovulation - the luteal phase - levels of LH and FSH decrease. The ruptured follicle closes (after releasing the egg) and forms a corpus luteum, which produces (...) with erratic menstruation. Treatment such as chemotherapy or pelvic irradiation may cause ovarian failure. Other factors that may affect the menstrual cycle Breast-feeding usually delays the return of normal menstruation postpartum, particularly if exclusive and may form the basis for the lactation amenorrhoea method (LAM) of contraception for the first six months of the baby's life. Rapid weight change - increase or decrease. Body weight below a certain level - eg, in eating disorders - particularly

2008 Mentor

1383. Abdominal Pain In Pregnancy

. [ ] Investigations Bedside tests Urine dipstick. Urine pregnancy test: Urine beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG) tests are sensitive, detecting beta-hCG at 25 IU/L (a level normally reached nine days post-conception). A negative urine beta-hCG result does not absolutely rule out an ectopic pregnancy - if discordant with the clinical picture, hospital doctors should arrange serum beta-hCG. GPs suspecting ectopic pregnancy should refer for urgent specialist assessment. [ ] Bedside glucose test. Fetal CTG (...) is preferred. Laparoscopy is increasingly used for diagnosis and treatment. Did you find this information useful? Thanks for your feedback! Why not subscribe to the newsletter? Email address * We'd love to send you our articles and latest news by email, giving you the best opportunity to stay up to date with expert written health and lifestyle content. By clicking 'Subscribe' you agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit

2008 Mentor

1384. Abbreviations

Ambulance Incident Officer AJ ankle jerk ALF acute liver failure ALS amyotrophic lateral sclerosis AMAs anti-mitochondrial antibodies AMH anti-Müllerian hormone AMHP Approved Mental Health Professional ANA antinuclear antibody ANCA antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody Anti-GBM antiglomerular basement membrane antibody anti-RNP antibodies to ribonucleoprotein anti-U1-RNP anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein a-NVH asymptomatic non-visible haematuria AP anteroposterior aPL antiphospholipid aPPT activated partial (...) Postnatal Depression Scale ePFIP electronic Prescribing and Financial Information for Practices EPO erythropoietin EPSEs extra-pyramidal side-effects ER (o)estrogen receptor ERCP endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography ERG electroretinography ERP exposure and relapse prevention ERT enzyme replacement therapy ESBL extended-spectrum beta-lactamase ESES electrical status epilepticus in sleep ESR erythrocyte sedimentation rate ESWL extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy EUA examination under

2008 Mentor

1385. Benign Intracranial Hypertension

of IIH was calculated as 10.9 per 100,000 (85.7 per 100,000 in obese women). Risk factors It mostly occurs in young obese females in their third or fourth decade. There is an increased risk in women with menstrual irregularity. Female-to-male ratio is between 3:1 to 8:1. Up to 90% of patients are overweight. In women it may coincide with recent weight gain, fluid retention, the first trimester of pregnancy and the postpartum period. Aetiology Known associations include: Endocrine: adrenal (...) to stay up to date with expert written health and lifestyle content. By clicking 'Subscribe' you agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references ; Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Lancet Neurol. 2006 May5(5):433-42. ; Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2007 Feb11(1):62-8. ; Idiopathic

2008 Mentor

1386. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)

partner, not more than one sexual partner in the previous year, no past history of STI). She is not postnatal, post-miscarriage or recently had a TOP or gynaecological surgery. She is not pregnant. She has not recently had treatment for BV. There are no signs of alternative causes of vaginal discharge (fever, bleeding, pain, itch). Raised pH if pH paper is available to measure it (see below). If empirical diagnosis/treatment is not appropriate, examine and swab as per local pathology laboratory (...) for your feedback! Why not subscribe to the newsletter? Email address * We'd love to send you our articles and latest news by email, giving you the best opportunity to stay up to date with expert written health and lifestyle content. By clicking 'Subscribe' you agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references ; NICE CKS

2008 Mentor

1387. Anti-D (Rho) Immunoglobulin

this might be available which will avoid unnecessary testing and anti-D Ig administration in some women. Postnatal prophylaxis After a Kleihauer test, at least 500 IU of anti-D should be given to every non-sensitised RhD-negative woman, within 72 hours of delivering a rhesus-positive infant. If the pregnancy is stillborn (and no sample can be obtained from the baby), anti-D should be given. FMH testing should be undertaken on all RhD-negative women delivering RhD-positive infants to determine (...) in the postpartum period with anti-D Ig provided that separate syringes are used and the products are administered into different limbs. [ ] Adverse effects Local pain and tenderness can occur. This can be limited by dividing larger doses over several injection sites. Fever, malaise, headaches, cutaneous reactions and chills can occur. Rarely, nausea, vomiting, hypotension and tachycardia have been reported. Allergic or anaphylactic reactions can include dyspnoea and shock. There may be no history

2008 Mentor

1388. Booking Criteria and Home Delivery

an assessment, including visiting the place of the intended confinement. It does not have to be palatial but it should be adequate. There should be adequate standards of heating, lighting and hygiene. There should be a telephone in case of need. In these days of mobile telephones the need is less clear but some more remote areas may have difficult mobile reception. There should be adequate social support. This may be a husband (or partner), mother or even mother-in-law. There should be someone to help look (...) for antenatal and postnatal care but are unlikely to be involved directly in intrapartum care, although it can be negotiated as an enhanced service. The practitioner must be appropriately trained and regularly updated. Midwives are autonomous and may refer directly to hospital if the need arises, saving crucial time and exercising their own skill and judgement. They may well suture the perineum themselves if this is required, although a GP may still be asked to do this. The GP may also be asked to check

2008 Mentor

1389. Antiphospholipid syndrome Full Text available with Trip Pro

is recommended throughout pregnancy. [ , ] Treatment should begin as soon as pregnancy is confirmed. For women with APS and a history of pre-eclampsia or IUGR, low-dose aspirin is recommended. Women with aPL antibodies should be considered for postpartum thromboprophylaxis. [ ] Complications APS may produce a cerebrovascular event in young individuals. It is usually thrombotic but it may be embolic from Libman-Sacks endocarditis. APS can also produce myocardial infarctions in young people. Cardiac valvular (...) articles and latest news by email, giving you the best opportunity to stay up to date with expert written health and lifestyle content. By clicking 'Subscribe' you agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references ; Diagnosis and management of the antiphospholipid syndrome. BMJ. 2010 May 14340:c2541. doi: 10.1136

2008 Mentor

1390. Contraception - General Overview

agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references ; NICE Quality Standard (September 2016) ; Population Matters, 2011 ; Office for National Statistics, 26 June 2014 ; Office for National Statistics ; Office for National Statistics ; Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC), 30 October 2014 ; Contraceptive (...) million in 2014 and estimated to rise to 70 million by 2027. [ ] Whilst considering and respecting different religious and cultural values, we should strive to ensure that every woman, who wishes to, has access to safe and effective contraception. Current contraceptive usage in the UK The last survey on contraceptive use was done by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in 2008-9 and at that time showed: [ ] 75% of women aged 16-49 years use some type of contraception. 25% of women use the combined

2008 Mentor

1391. Congenital Rubella Syndrome

. Serological and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing is the gold standard investigation and the local Health Protection Unit (HPU) can provide a testing kit. [ ] Criteria for postnatal diagnosis in the baby: IgM antibodies do not cross the placenta and indicate a recent infection acquired after birth. Unexpected persistence of rubella IgG (does not drop at two-fold dilution/month as maternal IgG does - which is cleared by six months). PCR is a very sensitive test for the virus. [ ] Management (...) as part of . Elimination of both rubella and CRS should be possible via: Universal immunisation of infants and young children. Disease surveillance. Ensuring immunity in women of childbearing age, prior to conception. Because the clinical diagnosis is so unreliable, a history of having had the disease is not a reason to forgo immunisation. Human normal immunoglobulin is not routinely used for post-exposure protection from rubella since there is no evidence that it is effective. Immunoglobulin

2008 Mentor

1392. Cardiac Disease In Pregnancy

and European Guidelines. You may find one of our more useful. In this article In This Article Cardiac Disease In Pregnancy In this article Cardiac disease is the most common cause of indirect maternal death and the most common overall cause of death. Therefore, women with pre-existing cardiac disease and those who present with cardiac disease during pregnancy require specialist assessment and management during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Epidemiology Cardiac disease in pregnancy (...) may be required in cases of diagnostic difficulty. Management Salt restriction should be instituted and diuretics prescribed to relieve pulmonary oedema. Vasodilators such as hydralazine, nitrates or amlodipine should be given to reduce afterload in the presence of ventricular dysfunction. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are fetotoxic but are the mainstay of treatment postpartum. Patients are at high risk of thromboembolism and anticoagulation should be considered. [ ] The timing

2008 Mentor

1393. Budd-Chiari Syndrome

occurs after stem-cell transplantation. Chronic BCS is thought to have a genetic basis: there is a high prevalence of myeloproliferative disease in these patients. [ ] Aetiology Haematological : Polycythaemia vera and other myeloproliferative disorders. Thrombophilic conditions - eg, deficiencies of protein C, protein S, antithrombin III or factor V Leiden. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Essential thrombocytosis. Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. Post bone marrow transplant. Reduced blood (...) flow : vena caval abnormalities (eg, webs, congenital absence of part of the vessel), right heart failure, constrictive pericarditis, right atrial myxoma. Obstetric : the condition can occur during pregnancy and postpartum. Drugs : combined oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy, urethane. Chronic infections : hydatid disease, amoebic abscesses, aspergillosis, syphilis, tuberculosis. Chronic inflammatory conditions : inflammatory bowel disease, sarcoid, systemic lupus erythematosus

2008 Mentor

1394. Bullous Dermatoses (Blisters and Bullae)

the conjunctiva, oesophagus, labia, vagina, cervix, penis, urethra and anus. Lesions on the back are common in patients confined to bed. This large area of skin loss will cause problems with fluid loss, temperature homeostasis and as a portal of infection. Pemphigoid gestationis This is a rare autoimmune subepidermal bullous dermatosis that occurs during pregnancy and postpartum [ ] . See the separate article. Diagnosis is made on the basis of the presence of a subepidermal vesicle on routine histological (...) peripherally, often sparing the face, palms and soles. Mucosal lesions occur in fewer than 20% of cases. Symptoms usually subside at delivery but dramatic flares can occur immediately postpartum. It usually resolves within weeks to months after delivery and possibly quicker with breastfeeding. It may recur with the resumption of menstruation, use of oral contraception and with subsequent pregnancies. This is unaffected by a change in partner. Bullous pemphigoid Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is not only the most

2008 Mentor

1395. Atrophic Vaginitis

: Natural menopause or oophorectomy. Anti-oestrogenic treatments - eg, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors. Radiotherapy or chemotherapy. It can also occur postpartum or with breast-feeding, due to reduced oestrogen levels. Presentation It is important to initiate discussion regarding any vaginal dryness with postmenopausal women, as many women are very reluctant to talk about it or initiate conversation about it. Women are poorly aware that vulvovaginal atrophy is a chronic condition with a significant (...) with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references ; Genitourinary syndrome of menopause: new terminology for vulvovaginal atrophy from the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health and the North American Menopause Society. Menopause. 2014 Oct21(10):1063-8. doi: 10.1097/GME.0000000000000329. ; Impact of vulvovaginal atrophy on sexual health and quality of life at postmenopause. Climacteric. 2014 Feb17(1):3-9

2008 Mentor

1396. Autism Full Text available with Trip Pro

. Various environmental factors may also contribute to ASD, including: Prenatal factors such as advanced parental age, exposure to teratogens (eg, thalidomide, maternal anticonvulsants such as valproic acid and organophosphates), maternal diabetes, and certain viral infections (eg, congenital rubella syndrome, influenza, cytomegalovirus). Perinatal factors such as low birth weight, abnormally short gestation length and birth asphyxia. Postnatal factors such as autoimmune disease, viral infection (...) useful? Thanks for your feedback! Why not subscribe to the newsletter? Email address * We'd love to send you our articles and latest news by email, giving you the best opportunity to stay up to date with expert written health and lifestyle content. By clicking 'Subscribe' you agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading

2008 Mentor

1397. Bleeding Disorders

gingival disease and unrelated to brushing. Following dental extraction. Postpartum haemorrhage. After injections or surgical procedures. Also enquire regarding: Current medication: Including aspirin, clopidogrel, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, warfarin and other anticoagulants. Complementary and alternative medicines - eg, garlic tablets, milk thistle [ ] . Remember drug interactions between warfarin and other medications that prolong the international normalised ratio (INR). Family history (...) and latest news by email, giving you the best opportunity to stay up to date with expert written health and lifestyle content. By clicking 'Subscribe' you agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references ; United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation (UKHCDO) ; Functional characterization of a 13-bp deletion (c

2008 Mentor

1398. Coarctation of the Aorta

antagonists may be used alongside beta-blockers to treat post-correction hypertension if the aortic arch obstruction is eliminated. Patients are at risk of infective endocarditis and the level of risk is increased if the coarctation is associated with other conditions (for example, bicuspid aortic valve). Guidance on antibiotic prophylaxis has changed and is covered in the separate article . Surgery or balloon angioplasty Angioplasty, with or without stenting, may be used to correct the coarctation (...) systolic/diastolic function progressing to congestive cardiac failure. Thoracic aortic aneurysm. Aortic dissection - high risk in pregnancy. Cerebral aneurysm rupture - high risk in pregnancy. Hypertension. Infective endocarditis. Paralysis due to spinal cord ischaemia. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Endocardial fibroelastosis. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Postoperative chylothorax due to thoracic duct damage. Postoperative mesenteric arteritis due to sudden increase in visceral perfusion (post

2008 Mentor

1399. Acute Pituitary Failure

for signs and symptoms of acute pituitary failure when performing pituitary stimulation tests, starting anticoagulation therapy or when having coronary artery bypass or other major surgery. Postpartum pituitary necrosis (Sheehan's syndrome) [ ] Sheehan's syndrome is postpartum hypopituitarism caused by necrosis of the pituitary gland. It is usually the result of severe hypotension or shock caused by massive haemorrhage during or after delivery. Patients with Sheehan's syndrome have varying degrees (...) ? Thanks for your feedback! Why not subscribe to the newsletter? Email address * We'd love to send you our articles and latest news by email, giving you the best opportunity to stay up to date with expert written health and lifestyle content. By clicking 'Subscribe' you agree to our and . Subscribe Thanks for your feedback. if you would like to report a specific issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references

2008 Mentor

1400. Antenatal Care

advises healthcare professionals, at a woman's first contact with primary care, her booking visit and during the early postnatal period, to: Consider asking questions to screen for depression and anxiety as part of a general discussion about a woman's mental health and well-being. Ask about any past or present severe mental illness. Ask about past or present treatment by a specialist mental health service, including inpatient care Ask about any severe perinatal mental illness in a first-degree (...) should be given: Information about breast-feeding. Information to prepare her for labour and birth (birth plan, pain relief options, how to recognise the onset of active labour). Information about care of the new baby and preparations needed. Information about routine procedures such as newborn screening and vitamin K prophylaxis. Advice about postnatal self-care, along with information about postnatal depression and "baby blues". At 38 weeks, she should be given: Information about management options

2008 Mentor

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>