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Postpartum Office Visit

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61. International evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

International evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) International evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome 2018Publication approval The guideline recommendations on pages 16 to 34 of this document were approved by the Chief Executive Officer of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) on 2 July 2018 under section 14A of the National Health and Medical Research Council Act 1992

2018 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

62. Management of Cardiovascular Diseases during Pregnancy

: expert counselling required Yes: pregnancy contraindicated: if pregnancy occurs, termination should be discussed Care during pregnancy Local hospital Local hospital Referral hospital Expert centre for pregnancy and cardiac disease Expert centre for pregnancy and cardiac disease Minimal follow-up visits during pregnancy Once or twice Once per trimester Bimonthly Monthly or bimonthly Monthly Location of delivery Local hospital Local hospital Referral hospital Expert centre for pregnancy and cardiac (...) cardiac event rate 2.5–5% 5.7–10.5% 10–19% 19–27% 40–100% Counselling Yes Yes Yes Yes: expert counselling required Yes: pregnancy contraindicated: if pregnancy occurs, termination should be discussed Care during pregnancy Local hospital Local hospital Referral hospital Expert centre for pregnancy and cardiac disease Expert centre for pregnancy and cardiac disease Minimal follow-up visits during pregnancy Once or twice Once per trimester Bimonthly Monthly or bimonthly Monthly Location of delivery Local

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2018 European Society of Cardiology

63. Intrapartum fetal surveillance

. In essence, you are free to copy and communicate the work in its current form for non-commercial purposes, as long as you attribute Queensland Clinical Guidelines, Queensland Health and abide by the licence terms. You may not alter or adapt the work in any way. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au/deed.en For further information contact Queensland Clinical Guidelines, RBWH Post Office, Herston Qld 4029, email Guidelines@health.qld.gov.au, phone (07 (...) ) 3131 6777. For permissions beyond the scope of this licence contact: Intellectual Property Officer, Queensland Health, GPO Box 48, Brisbane Qld 4001, email ip_officer@health.qld.gov.au, phone (07) 3234 1479. Queensland Clinical Guideline: Intrapartum fetal surveillance Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 3 of 30 Flow Chart: Mode of fetal heart rate monitoring Abbreviations: APH Antepartum Haemorrhage; BMI Body Mass Index; CTG Cardiotocograph; FBS Fetal blood sample; FGR

2019 Queensland Health

64. Interpregnancy Care

( ), such as reproductive life planning, screening for depression, vaccination, managing diabetes or hypertension if needed, education about future health, assisting the patient to develop a postpartum care team, and making plans for long-term medical care (Box 1). Timing of visits should consider any changes in insurance coverage anticipated after delivery. What Are the Clinical Components of Interpregnancy Care? Breastfeeding and Maternal Health Health care providers should routinely provide anticipatory guidance (...) ( ). Depression All women should be screened for depression in the postpartum period and then as part of well-woman care during the interpregnancy period. Such screening should be implemented with systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate follow-up. Postpartum depression screening also may occur at the well-child visit with procedures in place to accurately convey the information to the maternal care provider. Perinatal depression and anxiety affect one in seven women

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

65. Ethical Considerations for the Care of Patients With Obesity

to address any identified bias to help ensure that it does not interfere with the delivery of respectful clinical care for patients with obesity. Box 1 includes questions for self-reflection to help obstetrician–gynecologists identify implicit bias. Patient-Centered Counseling to Address Obesity Obstetrician–gynecologists may find it difficult during a typical office visit to initiate a dialogue about weight, healthy diet, and lifestyle, especially when other problems must be addressed or if the patient (...) “as is” without any warranty of accuracy, reliability, or otherwise, either express or implied. ACOG does not guarantee, warrant, or endorse the products or services of any firm, organization, or person. Neither ACOG nor its officers, directors, members, employees, or agents will be liable for any loss, damage, or claim with respect to any liabilities, including direct, special, indirect, or consequential damages, incurred in connection with this publication or reliance on the information presented. All ACOG

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

66. Syphilis in pregnancy

purposes, as long as you attribute Queensland Clinical Guidelines, Queensland Health and abide by the licence terms. You may not alter or adapt the work in any way. To view a copy of this licence, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.en For further information, contact Queensland Clinical Guidelines, RBWH Post Office, Herston Qld 4029, email Guidelines@health.qld.gov.au, phone (07) 3131 6777. For permissions beyond the scope of this licence, contact: Intellectual Property (...) Officer, Queensland Health, GPO Box 48, Brisbane Qld 4001, email ip_officer@health.qld.gov.au, phone (07) 3234 1479. Queensland Clinical Guideline: Syphilis in pregnancy Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 3 of 31 Flow Chart: Antenatal care IM: intramuscular injection, MSM: Men who have sex with men, PCR: Polymerase Chain Reaction QSSS: Queensland Syphilis Surveillance Service, STI: sexually transmitted infection, 4 weeks before birth · Indicated following risk assessment

2019 Queensland Health

67. Prepregnancy Counseling

of accuracy, reliability, or otherwise, either express or implied. ACOG does not guarantee, warrant, or endorse the products or services of any firm, organization, or person. Neither ACOG nor its officers, directors, members, employees, or agents will be liable for any loss, damage, or claim with respect to any liabilities, including direct, special, indirect, or consequential damages, incurred in connection with this publication or reliance on the information presented. All ACOG committee members (...) a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range before attempting pregnancy, because abnormal high or low BMI is associated with infertility and maternal and fetal pregnancy complications. Introduction Obstetrician–gynecologists have a prime opportunity to improve maternal and fetal outcomes through prepregnancy counseling. Like a well-woman visit, the prepregnancy visit (when the patient presents to discuss a potential future pregnancy) provides an excellent opportunity to counsel patients about

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

68. 2018 Update on Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management of Seasonal Influenza

in severe illness and death, particularly among very young children, older adults, pregnant and postpartum women within 2 weeks of delivery, people with neurologic disorders, and people with certain chronic medical conditions including chronic pulmonary, cardiac, and metabolic disease, and those who are immunocompromised [2–8]. During 2010–2018, seasonal influenza epidemics were associated with an estimated 4.3–23 million medical visits, 140 000–960 000 hospitalizations, and 12000–79 000 respiratory (...) . Hayden, Scott A. Harper, Jon Mark Hirshon, Michael G. Ison, B. Lynn Johnston, Shandra L. Knight, Allison McGeer, Laura E. Riley, Cameron R. Wolfe, Paul E. Alexander, and Andrew T. Pavia For full document, including tables and references, please visit the . Abstract These clinical practice guidelines are an update of the guidelines published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in 2009, prior to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This document addresses new information regarding

2019 Infectious Diseases Society of America

69. Incorporating Recognition and Management of Perinatal Depression Into Pediatric Practice

early evidence-based treatment and referrals, if necessary. Despite significant gains in screening rates from 2004 to 2013, a minority of pediatricians routinely screen for postpartum depression, and many mothers are still not identified or treated. Pediatric primary care clinicians, with a core mission of promoting child and family health, are in an ideal position to implement routine postpartum depression screens at several well-child visits throughout infancy and to provide mental health support (...) at establishing, improving, and maintaining programs to train professionals to screen and treat for maternal perinatal depression. The most recent update of the AAP’s Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents, Fourth Edition includes a recommendation for pediatric providers to screen for postpartum depression at 4 well-child visits in the first 6 months of life and refer to appropriate evaluation and treatment services for the mother and infant when indicated

2019 American Academy of Pediatrics

70. WHO consolidated guideline on self-care interventions for health: sexual and reproductive health and rights

122 95 116 89 112 122 98 92 112 123 77 4.4 Combating sexually transmitted infections (including HIV), reproductive tract infections, cervical cancer and other gynaecological morbidities 4.3 Eliminating unsafe abortion 4.2 Providing high- quality services for family planning, including infertility services 4.1 Improving antenatal care, delivery, postpartum and newborn care 5.1 Overview 6.1 Research on self-care contributing to WHO’s “triple billion” goals 7.1 Dissemination 5.4 Training needs (...) / AIDS [UNAIDS]), Lucinda O’Hanlon (Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights [OHCHR]), Shaffiq Essajee (United Nations Children’s Fund [UNICEF]), Kenechukwu Esom (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]), Ayman Abdelmohsen, Petra ten Hoope-Bender and Tim Sladden (United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]) and David Wilson (World Bank). The following WHO staff members contributed as members of the WHO Guideline Steering Group (SG), which managed the guideline development

2019 World Health Organisation Guidelines

71. WHO Guideline: recommendations on digital interventions for health system strengthening

the way we manage our own health. Today we have more health information – and misinformation – at our fing ertips than any generation in history. Before we ever sit down in a doctor’s office, most o f us have Googled our symptoms and diagnosed ourselves – perhaps inaccurately. Similarly, digital technologies are being used to improve the training and performance of health workers, and to address a diversity of persistent weaknesses in health systems. Harnessing the power of digital technologies

2019 World Health Organisation Guidelines

72. Chronic Pelvic Pain

of laparoscopy and hysteroscopy in the diagnostics and treatment of infertility. Neuro Endocrinol Lett, 2006. 27: 813. 333. Hay-Smith, E.J. Therapeutic ultrasound for postpartum perineal pain and dyspareunia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2000: CD000495. 334. Cappell, J., et al. Clinical profile of persistent genito-pelvic postpartum pain. Midwifery, 2017. 50: 125. 335. Landau, R., et al. Chronic pain after childbirth. Int J Obstet Anesth, 2013. 22: 133. 336. Roovers, J.P., et al. A randomised controlled trial

2019 European Association of Urology

73. Management of Infertility

EPC systematic reviews, see www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/reference/purpose.cfm. AHRQ expects that these systematic reviews will be helpful to health plans, providers, purchasers, government programs, and the healthcare system as a whole. Transparency and stakeholder input are essential to the Effective Health Care Program. Please visit the website (www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov) to see draft research questions and reports or to join an email list to learn about new program products (...) and opportunities for input. If you have comments on this systematic review, they may be sent by mail to the Task Order Officer named below at: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, or by email to epc@ahrq.hhs.gov. Gopal Khanna, M.B.A. Director Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Stephanie Chang, M.D., M.P.H. Director Evidence-based Practice Center Program Center for Evidence and Practice Improvement Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Arlene S

2019 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

74. The Irish Maternity Early Warning System (IMEWS) National Clinical Guideline

The Irish Maternity Early Warning System (IMEWS) National Clinical Guideline Irish Maternity Early Warning System (IMEWS) V2 National Clinical Guideline No. 4 National Patient Safety Office Oifig Náisiúnta um Shábháilteacht Othar February 2019The Irish Maternity Early Warning System (IMEWS) Version 2 National Clinical Guideline (NCG) has been updated by the Childbirth Guideline Development Group (GDG), established under the auspices of the HSE National Clinical Programme for Obstetrics (...) and Gynaecology. The original IMEWS was developed under the auspices of the Health Service Executive Acute Hospitals Directorate as a collaborative project between the Office of Nursing and Midwifery Director and the National Clinical Programme in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The IMEWS clinical practice guideline was first published in 2013 and was subsequently updated, quality assured and published as a National Clinical Effectiveness Committee (NCEC) NCG No. 4 IMEWS in November 2014. Using this National

2019 HIQA Guidelines

75. Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Neurogenic Overactive Bladder (OAB) in Adults: an AUA/SUFU Guideline

logistical challenges (e.g., therapies that require frequent visits to a physician’s office). The negative impact of OAB symptoms on psychosocial functioning and quality of life also has been well-documented. 19-22 Carrying out the activities of daily life and engaging in social and occupational activities can be profoundly affected by lack of bladder control and incontinence. Urinary incontinence in particular may have severe psychological and social consequences, resulting in restricted activities

2019 American Urological Association

76. Perinatal Palliative Care

with them during the postpartum period. When a patient opts for newborn rooming-in, the neonatal and palliative care teams should visit the family to ensure the baby’s comfort and to provide practical and emotional support to the parents, while also respecting the family’s privacy during this important time. These visits are intended to provide newborn palliative care at the bedside, to educate, to offer emotional support, and to minimize stress. Throughout this process, the newborn’s parents (...) , and child life specialists. The goal of this team is to provide support and continuity of care throughout pregnancy, delivery, and the postpartum and neonatal periods. Components of Perinatal Palliative Comfort Care A goal of this document is to provide a framework to support provision of perinatal palliative comfort care but not to be overly prescriptive or to mandate certain practices. Although specific offerings may vary between institutions, some care components are generally advisable across

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

77. Screening and Management of Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

modality that does not require special training for insertion and can help avoid further invasive procedures. Most studies on intrauterine balloons have focused on women with postpartum hemorrhage and have demonstrated reduction in bleeding in an emergent setting ( , ). Intrauterine balloons designed for obstetric use in adult women are not appropriately sized for the adolescent patient. Instead, a Foley catheter should be placed with a 30-cc balloon that can be inserted easily through the cervix (...) hemostasis and decrease the potential risk of bleeding. Perioperative hemostatic agents include desmopressin acetate and antifibrinolytic medications (eg, aminocaproic acid, tranexamic acid). Currently, no standardized protocol exists for operative placement of the LNG-IUD in the patient with a bleeding disorder. In-office placement of an IUD versus placement in the operating room will depend on the severity of the bleeding disorder and judgment of the gynecologist in consultation with a hematologist

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

78. Practice Advisory Interim Guidance for Care of Obstetric Patients During a Zika Virus Outbreak

updated its interim guidance for prepregnancy counseling and prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus for men with possible Zika virus exposure. This Practice Advisory includes updates from CDC’s guidance that are relevant to obstetric care providers. Please visit CDC’s website to see the MMWR with all updates: Below is a summary of recent critical updates to this Practice Advisory. All modules with the date August 31, 2018 contain new or revised information and should be reviewed. Men (...) exposure is defined as currently living in or frequent travel (eg, daily or weekly) to areas with Zika virus transmission Assessment and Testing (Updated: September 13, 2017) Assessment All pregnant women in the U.S. and U.S. territories should be assessed for possible Zika virus exposure and symptoms at each prenatal care visit . Obstetrician-gynecologists and other h ealth care providers should continue to ask pregnant women at each prenatal visit about possible Zika virus exposure (e.g., travel

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

79. Substance use disorders in pregnancy: clinical, ethical, and research imperatives of the opioid epidemic

and whom to screen for substance use disorder Ideally, screening for substance use disorder should occur when clinicians in a health-care system first recognize a pregnancy. In most cases, this would be the first prenatal visit. However, emergency rooms, primary care offices, and urgent care centers are all places where pregnancies are diagnosed. Clinicians can facilitate early substance use disorder treatment by considering the use of a basic screening questionnaire coupled with a list of treatment (...) the baby; the woman may test positive because of the pain medicine she may have received at delivery or postpartum. Biologic testing panels The constituent components of biologic drug testing panels are often determined by the hospital laboratory, based on local drug usage profiles. However, illicit drugs in the community can change rapidly; ideally, and if possible, providers should be aware of local trends. The hospital laboratory, health department, or coroner’s office may help provide information

2019 Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

80. What is the evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being? A scoping review

What is the evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being? A scoping review Daisy Fancourt | Saoirse Finn HEALTH EVIDENCE NETWORK SYNTHESIS REPORT 67 What is the evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being? A scoping review World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe UN City, Marmorvej 51, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark Tel.: +45 45 33 70 00 Fax: +45 45 33 70 01 Email: eurocontact@who.int Website: www.euro.who.int HEALTH EVIDENCE NETWORK (...) and randomized controlled trials from diverse disciplines. The beneficial impact of the arts could be furthered through acknowledging and acting on the growing evidence base; promoting arts engagement at the individual, local and national levels; and supporting cross-sectoral collaboration. Keywords ART, MEDICINE IN THE ARTS, CULTURE, ARTS IN HEALTH Address requests about publications of the WHO Regional Office for Europe to: Publications WHO Regional Office for Europe UN City, Marmorvej 51 DK-2100

2019 WHO Health Evidence Network

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