How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

519 results for

Postpartum Endometritis

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

501. Group A streptococcal endometritis: Report of an outbreak and review of the literature (Full text)

Group A streptococcal endometritis: Report of an outbreak and review of the literature Two cases of group A streptococcus (gas) postpartum endometritis were diagnosed within 24 h following uncomplicated vaginal delivery. Investigation by the infection control service identified all 10 obstetric personnel who performed any invasive procedure on both cases. These personnel were questioned about a recent history of sore throat, skin lesions, vaginal or rectal symptoms. Throat and rectal cultures

1994 The Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases PubMed

502. Gentamicin and clindamycin therapy in postpartum endometritis: the efficacy of daily dosing versus dosing every 8 hours. (PubMed)

Gentamicin and clindamycin therapy in postpartum endometritis: the efficacy of daily dosing versus dosing every 8 hours. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of gentamicin and clindamycin given once daily versus the more common 8-hour dosing regimen for the treatment of postpartum endometritis.In a prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study, patients who had postpartum endometritis diagnosed were randomly selected to receive 1.5 mg/kg gentamicin and 900 mg (...) in the daily-dose group and 38 of 55 (69%) patients in the thrice-daily dose group had treatment success (P =.12).Once-daily dosing with gentamicin and clindamycin in women with postpartum endometritis has a similar success rate as the standard every 8-hour dosing schedule.

2003 American journal of obstetrics and gynecology

503. Comparative efficacy and safety of mezlocillin, cefoxitin, and clindamycin plus gentamicin in postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

Comparative efficacy and safety of mezlocillin, cefoxitin, and clindamycin plus gentamicin in postpartum endometritis. The efficacy of mezlocillin versus cefoxitin versus clindamycin plus gentamicin was evaluated in 152 patients with postpartum endometritis. There were no statistically significant differences in rate of cure among the three groups (87% with mezlocillin, 82% with cefoxitin, and 92% with clindamycin-gentamicin). There were no severe adverse reactions observed in any of the three (...) treatment regimens. Mezlocillin is as safe and effective as cefoxitin and clindamycin-gentamicin for treatment of postpartum endometritis.

1987 Obstetrics and Gynecology

504. The pharmacokinetics of once-daily dosing with gentamicin in women with postpartum endometritis. (Full text)

The pharmacokinetics of once-daily dosing with gentamicin in women with postpartum endometritis. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and cost of once-daily dosing with gentamicin in women with postpartum endometritis.Gentamicin in a single daily dose of 4.5 mg/kg was administered intravenously to 10 women with postpartum endometritis. Peak and trough gentamicin levels were measured, and nephrotoxicity and clinical ototoxicity were monitored. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed, and a cost analysis (...) of once-daily gentamicin administration was performed.The mean elimination constant was 0.105 +/- 0.008 L/h, and the mean volume of distribution was 0.34 +/- 0.07 L/kg. Mean peak gentamicin levels exceeded 11 mg/L, and all trough levels were < 0.3 mg/L. Cost savings of 44% were achieved with once-daily dosing of gentamicin, compared with traditional thrice-daily dosing.Once-daily dosing with gentamicin in women with postpartum endometritis achieves therapeutic peak levels without drug accumulation

1998 Infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology PubMed

505. A comparison of once-daily and 8-hour gentamicin dosing in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

A comparison of once-daily and 8-hour gentamicin dosing in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. To evaluate whether once-daily gentamicin dosing is as effective as the traditional 8-hour regimen for the treatment of postpartum endometritis.Postpartum women with endometritis were randomized to receive gentamicin 5 mg/kg as a single daily dose or 1.75 mg/kg every 8 hours. All subjects also received clindamycin. Each participant had a peak serum gentamicin level of at least 5.0 micrograms/mL (...) < .001). Pharmacy costs averaged $16.12 +/- 5.68 for the study group and $41.75 +/- 17.41 for the control group, also a significant difference (P < .001). Nurse tasking time averaged 13.62 +/- 2.56 minutes for the study group and 28.06 +/- 8.77 minutes for the control group (P < .001).In patients with postpartum endometritis, once-daily gentamicin dosing provides consistently high peak serum levels of gentamicin, requires less nurse tasking time, costs less, and is as effective as the 8-hour dosing

1996 Obstetrics and Gynecology

506. Ampicillin/sulbactam vs. clindamycin/gentamicin in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

Ampicillin/sulbactam vs. clindamycin/gentamicin in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ampicillin/sulbactam with those of clindamycin/gentamicin.A prospective, randomized clinical trial of patients with the diagnosis of postpartum endometritis. Intravenous ampicillin, 2.0 g, combined with 1.0 g sulbactam was administered every six hours or intravenous clindamycin, 900 mg, plus gentamicin, 1.5 mg/kg (not to exceed 150 mg unless gentamicin levels were (...) obtained) every eight hours. Endometrial and blood specimens were obtained for culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing.One hundred twenty-nine hospitalized women with the diagnosis of endometritis were enrolled. Both treatment regimens were equally effective. At the end of treatment, 42 of 51 (82%) ampicillin/sulbactam-treated patients achieved clinical cure in comparison to 47 of 56 (84%) patients in the clindamycin/gentamicin group. Respective bacterial eradication rates of 86% and 84% for each

1996 Journal of Reproductive Medicine

507. Susceptibility of female pelvic pathogens to oral antibiotic agents in patients who develop postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

Susceptibility of female pelvic pathogens to oral antibiotic agents in patients who develop postpartum endometritis. Fifteen hundred patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized study on the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis during cesarean section. Two hundred thirty-one patients developed postpartum endometritis, and the isolates obtained from the endometrium were tested for sensitivity to ampicillin, cefuroxime, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and clindamycin. Minimum inhibitory

1991 American journal of obstetrics and gynecology

508. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral antibiotic therapy following intravenous antibiotic therapy for postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral antibiotic therapy following intravenous antibiotic therapy for postpartum endometritis. One hundred thirty-six patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral antibiotic therapy (amoxicillin) versus placebo following successful intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy for postpartum endometritis. No subjects were readmitted to the hospital for recurrent endometritis and there were no wound infections (...) or recurrent fevers. Minor side effects were seen in 10% of those taking amoxicillin and 14% of those taking placebo. Compliance was fair; only 52% of those taking amoxicillin and 65% of those taking placebo completed therapy. The lack of infectious complications in this high-risk population suggests that oral antibiotic therapy is unnecessary after successful IV antibiotic therapy for endometritis.

1991 Obstetrics and Gynecology

509. The importance of wound infection in antibiotic failures in the therapy of postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

The importance of wound infection in antibiotic failures in the therapy of postpartum endometritis. A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was done to compare the efficacy of cefoxitin (2 grams given intravenously every six hours) with ceftizoxime (2 grams given intravenously every 12 hours) in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. Thirty-eight patients received cefoxitin and 43 received ceftizoxime. Demographic variables (age, gravidity, parity and estimated gestational age (...) of the antibiotic. With multiple logistic regression, only abdominal wound infection was associated with failure of the antibiotic (p = 0.0002). We conclude that cefoxitin and ceftizoxime are equally effective in the therapy of postpartum endometritis and that abdominal wound infection is primarily responsible for persistent fever and, therefore, failure of the antibiotic in patients with postpartum endometritis.

1992 Surgery, gynecology & obstetrics

510. Ciprofloxacin versus gentamicin/clindamycin for postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

Ciprofloxacin versus gentamicin/clindamycin for postpartum endometritis. An open, randomized, comparative study of intravenous ciprofloxacin versus gentamicin and clindamycin was performed on women with postpartum endometritis. Ciprofloxacin alone successfully eradicated the infections in 35 of 49 patients (71%), while the combination of gentamicin/clindamycin cured 41 of 48 (85%) (P = .15). The microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity of the endometrial isolates confirmed the poor activity (...) of ciprofloxacin against anaerobic bacteria and less-than-optimal activity against Streptococcus faecalis. Ciprofloxacin, when used alone, may not be suitable for the treatment of postpartum endometritis.

1991 Journal of Reproductive Medicine

511. Postpartum endometritis: efficacy and tolerability of two antibiotic regimens. (PubMed)

Postpartum endometritis: efficacy and tolerability of two antibiotic regimens. A prospective, multicenter, open-label randomized trial was conducted to compare the efficacy and tolerability of imipenem-cilastatin (I-C) monotherapy with clindamycin+aminoglycoside (C+A) combination therapy. Forty-nine patients were able to be evaluated for clinical efficacy in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. Twenty-three patients received I-C and 26 received C+A therapy. The two groups were (...) % of those in the C+A group. Overall, these data support the use of I-C for the treatment of appropriate patients with postpartum endometritis.

1992 Clinical therapeutics

512. Suspected postpartum endometritis: a controlled clinical trial of single-agent antibiotic therapy with Amox-CA (Augmentin) vs. ampicillin-metronidazole +/- aminoglycoside. (PubMed)

Suspected postpartum endometritis: a controlled clinical trial of single-agent antibiotic therapy with Amox-CA (Augmentin) vs. ampicillin-metronidazole +/- aminoglycoside. Endometritis is the commonest postpartum complication and is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity, if not mortality. The object of the present clinical trial was to assess the efficiency of single-agent therapy with Amox-CA (Augmentin) (formulation which includes a beta-lactamase inhibitor), against standard

1990 European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology

513. Early postpartum endometritis. Randomized comparison of ampicillin/sulbactam vs. ampicillin, gentamicin and clindamycin. (PubMed)

Early postpartum endometritis. Randomized comparison of ampicillin/sulbactam vs. ampicillin, gentamicin and clindamycin. Seventy-six parturients with a clinical diagnosis of early postpartum endometritis were randomized to be treated with either standard therapy--ampicillin, gentamicin and clindamycin--or a new regimen, ampicillin/sulbactam. We deliberately chose to administer 1.5 g of ampicillin/sulbactam rather than a 3-g dose every six hours in order to accentuate any differences that might (...) for 3.6 days, whereas ampicillin/sulbactam cost $139.49 for 3.3 days. Therapy with ampicillin/sulbactam may be an equally effective and efficient way to treat patients with early postpartum endometritis.

1994 Journal of Reproductive Medicine

514. Antibiotic prophylaxis against postpartum endometritis after vaginal delivery: a prospective randomized comparison between Amox-CA (Augmentin) and abstention. (PubMed)

Antibiotic prophylaxis against postpartum endometritis after vaginal delivery: a prospective randomized comparison between Amox-CA (Augmentin) and abstention. The most common adverse outcome associated with vaginal delivery is endometritis. It plays a significant role in postpartum morbidity and mortality. There is considerable evidence to support the idea that a single dose of antibiotic after vaginal delivery might decrease the incidence of postpartum endometritis. In this study (...) extragenital infection, had a maternal temperature of less than 38 degrees C during labor and 1 h after delivery, and had no history of allergy to penicillins or cephalosporins. After application of exclusion criteria, 1373 patients were randomized and 1291 included 610 in Group I given Amox-CA and 681 in Group II without any antibiotic. A single dose of 1.2 g of Amox-CA was given by intravenous injection, 1 h after delivery, in Group I. Patients of Group II received no injection. Postpartum status

1993 European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology

515. Gentamicin dosing in postpartum women with endometritis. (PubMed)

Gentamicin dosing in postpartum women with endometritis. Postpartum women receiving gentamicin for endometritis were studied to determine if selective determination of gentamicin serum levels was cost-effective in terms of safety and efficacy. The women were randomized into two groups of 30 patients each. In the control group gentamicin serum levels were determined after the third dose. In the study group, levels were determined only if renal dysfunction was evident or if the patient failed (...) in otherwise healthy postpartum women with endometritis.

1989 American journal of obstetrics and gynecology

516. Polymicrobial early postpartum endometritis with facultative and anaerobic bacteria, genital mycoplasmas, and Chlamydia trachomatis: treatment with piperacillin or cefoxitin. (PubMed)

Polymicrobial early postpartum endometritis with facultative and anaerobic bacteria, genital mycoplasmas, and Chlamydia trachomatis: treatment with piperacillin or cefoxitin. A protected, triple-lumen transcervical culture method was used to recover organisms from the endometrium. At least one facultative or one anaerobic species of bacteria was recovered from 82% of the patients, and genital mycoplasmas were recovered from 76% of the women with endometritis. Bacteria together with genital (...) mycoplasmas were present in 61% of the women, bacteria alone were present in 20%, genital mycoplasmas alone were present in 16%, and Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 2% of the patients. The most common organisms included Gardnerella vaginalis, Peptococcus spp., Bacteroides spp., Staphylococcus epidermidis, group B Streptococcus, and Ureaplasma urealyticum. A randomized, double-blind regimen of either piperacillin or cefoxitin was equally successful in treating the postpartum endometritis.

1986 The Journal of infectious diseases

517. Comparison trial of clindamycin with aztreonam or gentamicin in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

Comparison trial of clindamycin with aztreonam or gentamicin in the treatment of postpartum endometritis. Sixty-two patients who had postpartum endometritis were treated with clindamycin in combination with either aztreonam or the aminoglycoside gentamicin. Currently, the combination of clindamycin and an aminoglycoside constitutes a treatment of choice for this condition. Our results suggest that aztreonam can be substituted for an aminoglycoside in the treatment of postpartum endometritis

1987 Clinical therapeutics

518. Bacterial vaginosis in early pregnancy may predispose for preterm birth and postpartum endometritis. (PubMed)

Bacterial vaginosis in early pregnancy may predispose for preterm birth and postpartum endometritis. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been reported to be associated with spontaneous preterm delivery and infectious morbidity after birth in non-Swedish populations. Our intention was to investigate the situation in a Swedish population.In this cohort study, 924 patients were enrolled consecutively. A Papanicolaou (Pap) smear, which included a posterior fornix sample, was obtained at the first visit (...) (median: 12 weeks and 1 day) at the two antenatal care units in central Göteborg 1990-91. Clue cells in the Pap smear were considered to be consistent with BV. The principal outcome variables were spontaneous preterm birth (< 37 weeks) and postpartum endometritis. A relative risk (RR) was calculated with a 95% confidence interval.The prevalence of BV was 15.6%. An association was seen between BV in early pregnancy and postpartum endometritis [RR 3.26 (1.38-7.71)]. A non-significant association

2002 Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica

519. Microbial aetiology and diagnostic criteria of postpartum endometritis in Nairobi, Kenya. (Full text)

Microbial aetiology and diagnostic criteria of postpartum endometritis in Nairobi, Kenya. Using a protected triple lumen device, Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis, or both, were isolated from the endometriums of five out of 35 women with clinical postpartum endometritis compared with none of a control group of 30 puerperal women without endometritis (p less than 0.05) in Nairobi, Kenya. These sexually transmitted agents were also found in 12 cervical specimens from women (...) with and three without postpartum endometritis (p = 0.04). Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum were equally isolated from the endometrium in both groups. Histology showed plasma cell infiltration in 6/25 patients compared with 1/22 controls (p = 0.06). A history of foul lochia (p less than 0.01) and abdominal pain (p = 0.02) were associated with postpartum endometritis. Sexually transmitted agents appear to be major causes of puerperal upper genital tract infections in Nairobi.

1988 Genitourinary Medicine PubMed

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>