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Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation

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1. Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation

Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Postinflammatory (...) Hypopigmentation Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation Aka: Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Skin inflammation or injury resulting in loss of pigment III. Causes Conditions Procedure Complications s Intralesional IV. Management Treat underlying cause V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source

2018 FP Notebook

2. Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation

Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Postinflammatory (...) Hypopigmentation Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation Aka: Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Skin inflammation or injury resulting in loss of pigment III. Causes Conditions Procedure Complications s Intralesional IV. Management Treat underlying cause V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Postinflammatory Hypopigmentation." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source

2018 FP Notebook

3. Postinflammatory hypopigmentation. (PubMed)

Postinflammatory hypopigmentation. Postinflammatory hypopigmentation is a common cause of acquired hypopigmentary disorders. It can be a result of cutaneous inflammation, injury or dermatological treatment. There are also many specific conditions that present with hypopigmentation other than postinflammatory hypopigmentation. Most cases of postinflammatory hypopigmentation improve spontaneously within weeks or months if the primary cause is ceased; however, it can be permanent (...) if there is complete destruction of melanocytes. This article reviews the aetiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, differential diagnosis and therapeutic options for postinflammatory hypopigmentation.© The Author(s). CED © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

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2011 Clinical & Experimental Dermatology

4. Acne clinical guideline

, complementary/alternative therapies, and the role of diet will be reviewed. This guideline does not examine the treatment of acne sequelae (eg, scarring or postinflammatory dyschromia). Methods A work group of 17 recognized acne experts, 1 general practitioner, 1 pediatrician, and 1 patient was convened to determine the scope of the guideline and identify clinical questions ( Table I ) in the diagnosis and management of AV. Work group members completed a disclosure of interests, which was periodically

2016 American Academy of Dermatology

5. A review of laser and light therapy in melasma (PubMed)

. Intense pulsed light, low fluence Q-switched lasers, and non-ablative fractionated lasers are the most common lasers and light treatments that are currently performed. They all appear effective but there is a high level of recurrence with time and some techniques are associated with an increased risk for postinflammatory hyper- or hypopigmentation. The number and frequency of treatments varies by device type but overall, Q-switched lasers require the greatest number of treatment applications to see (...) a benefit. Vascular-specific lasers do not appear to be effective for the treatment of melasma. Ablative fractionated lasers should be used with caution because they have a very high risk for postinflammatory hypo- and hyperpigmentation. The use of nonablative fractionated laser treatments compared with other laser and light options may result in slightly longer remission intervals. Picosecond lasers, fractional radiofrequency, and laser-assisted drug delivery are promising future approaches to treat

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2017 International journal of women's dermatology

6. Ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intense pulsed light for the treatment of photoaging skin in Chinese population: A split-face study. (PubMed)

Ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intense pulsed light for the treatment of photoaging skin in Chinese population: A split-face study. Intense pulsed light (IPL) is effective for the treatment of lentigines, telangiectasia, and generalized erythema, but is less effective in the removal of skin wrinkles. Fractional laser is effective on skin wrinkles and textural irregularities, but can induce postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), especially in Asians. This study (...) epidermal barrier function. No postoperative infection, hypopigmentation, or scarring occurred after IPL and AFL treatments. PIH occurred at 1 month after AFL treatment and disappeared at 30 days after completion of the combined therapy.AFL in combination with IPL is safe and effective for photoaging skin in Asians.Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

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2018 Medicine

7. "Treatment of Facial Hypopigmented Scars by the Laser Hole Technique using a Non-fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Asian". (PubMed)

or 2 months after initial treatment, the remaining hypopigmentation was treated by the same procedure.Treatment sessions were performed once for nine scars, twice for 22 scars, and three times for 12 scars. In most cases, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation was slightly diminished but maintained until the last follow-up. The fine irregular surface with multiple pitted scars was similar to that of normal skin. Scar improvement evaluation showed marked or excellent in 39 scars (90.7 percent (...) "Treatment of Facial Hypopigmented Scars by the Laser Hole Technique using a Non-fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Asian". Facial hypopigmented scars are usually characterized by white color and a glossy surface. To correct the two problems simultaneously, the authors attempted to induce persistent postinflammatory hyperpigmentation for color and to build multiple pitted scars like facial skin pores for texture. This study describes a laser hole method using a traditional nonfractional carbon

2018 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

8. Treatment of Asian Flushing Syndrome With Topical Alpha Agonists

of initial study visit Any prior treatment with lasers, intense pulsed light, photodynamic therapy, or other energy based therapy to the face. Facial hair, tattoos, facial characteristics, or cutaneous disease (such as actinic damage, melasma, postinflammatory hyper- or hypopigmentation, excessive telangiectasias, nevi, or other pigmentation) which may interfere with assessments of erythema in the opinion of the investigators. Current enrollment in an investigational drug or device study or participation

2018 Clinical Trials

9. Dermoscopy in Diagnosis of Pigmentary Skin Lesions

, permenant or temporary, systemic or region restricted). Pigmentary disorders are include alarge number of heterogenous conditions that are usually characterized by altered melanocyte density, melanin concentration, or both, and result in altered pigmentation of the skin. Some of these disorders are extremely common such as (melisma and vitiligo), whereas others are rare Differential Diagnosis of Hyper and Hypopigmentation: Hyperpigmentation Hypopigmentation Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (acne (...) , psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis, lichen planus, trauma, drugs, and fixed-drug eruptions) Melasma Solar lentigines Ephelides (freckles) Café-au-lait macules Nevi Melanoma and precursors Acquired (common) Vitiligo Pityriasis alba Tinea versicolor Postinflammatory hypopigmentation Congenital (uncommon) Albinism Piebaldism Tuberous sclerosis Hypomelanosis of Ito Several studies have shown that dermoscopy may come in very handy for assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general

2018 Clinical Trials

10. Dermoscopy in General Dermatology: A Practical Overview (PubMed)

, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma

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2016 Dermatology and therapy

11. Nonneoplastic Epithelial Disorders of the Vulva (Overview)

: , lentiginosis, and benign vulvar melanosis Postinflammatory hypopigmentation Vulvar melanosis [ ] Benign tumors, hamartomas, and cysts involving the vulvar region include the following [ ] : Bartholin and Skene duct cysts (fibroepithelial polyp) Fibroma, fibromyoma, and dermatofibroma Hidradenoma Syringoma Hemangioma Angiokeratoma Heterotopic sebaceous glands and sebaceous gland hyperplasia Papillomatosis (papillary vulvar hirsutism) Schwannoma [ ] Angiomyxoma: a benign and aggressive mesenchymal tumor (...) in the dermis following a previous inflammatory process caused by drug intake (end stage of a fixed drug eruption) or other dermatologic disorders localized to the vulva (eg, lichen planus, discoid lupus erythematosus, psoriasis). Postinflammatory hypopigmentation Postinflammatory hypopigmentation is due to temporary or permanent melanocyte damage of different causes, including skin injury with scar formation and chronic inflammatory skin diseases (eg, lichen sclerosus, discoid lupus erythematosus

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Nonlaser Hair Removal Techniques (Overview)

, no published data prove that damage occurs in the hair follicle or that these devices produce permanent hair removal. More likely, these devices represent a means for temporary hair shaft removal similar to waxing or plucking, but do not work well as a means of permanent hair removal. [ ] Important, and potentially permanent, adverse effects of electrolysis include scarring (ie, keloid formation) and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation, and these adverse effects are dependent (...) hair removal efficacy; however, IPL treatment is more commonly associated with postinflammatory pigmentation. [ , ] While IPL treatments were found to be more efficacious than those done with a ruby laser, IPL treatments were, again, associated with more adverse reactions—such as pain, discomfort, and crusting—than ruby laser treatments. [ , ] Nevertheless, treatment with all lasers and IPL sources rarely results in adverse effects. [ ] Laser and IPL devices are also capable of treating a variety

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Becker Melanosis (Follow-up)

factional laser therapy at 10 mJ/microbeam, coverage 35-45%, and topical bleaching (to reduce laser-induced postinflammatory hyperpigmentation), or topical bleaching alone. Treatment was moderately effective in some patients. However, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and relatively negative patient-reported outcomes still preclude ablative fractional laser therapy from being a standard therapy. [ ] These results have been observed by this author, and the concern of both postinflammatory (...) hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation should be discussed with the patient prior to treatment. In 2016, three patients with Becker nevus (two hypertrichotic) were treated using a combination approach with a 1550-nm Er-doped nonablative fractional laser and a long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser in a sequential manner over time. [ ] Although these individuals had a clinical improvement of greater than 75%, follow up was limited (3-18 mo). Patients should be advised that over time (months to several years), pigment

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Benign Vulvar Lesions (Follow-up)

vulvar melanosis Postinflammatory hypopigmentation Vulvar melanosis [ ] Benign tumors, hamartomas, and cysts involving the vulvar region include the following [ ] : Bartholin and Skene duct cysts (fibroepithelial polyp) Fibroma, fibromyoma, and dermatofibroma Hidradenoma Syringoma Hemangioma Angiokeratoma Heterotopic sebaceous glands and sebaceous gland hyperplasia Papillomatosis (papillary vulvar hirsutism) Schwannoma [ ] Angiomyxoma: a benign and aggressive mesenchymal tumor. [ ] Congenital (...) in the dermis following a previous inflammatory process caused by drug intake (end stage of a fixed drug eruption) or other dermatologic disorders localized to the vulva (eg, lichen planus, discoid lupus erythematosus, psoriasis). Postinflammatory hypopigmentation Postinflammatory hypopigmentation is due to temporary or permanent melanocyte damage of different causes, including skin injury with scar formation and chronic inflammatory skin diseases (eg, lichen sclerosus, discoid lupus erythematosus

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Urticaria, Chronic (Diagnosis)

may be pale to red (depending on background skin color) Lesions can be localized or generalized Lesions may be round, oval, annular, arcuate, serpiginous, or generalized Lesions resolve without postinflammatory pigmentary changes or scaling See for more detail. Diagnosis The diagnosis of chronic urticaria is largely clinical and based on a thorough history and physical examination. A limited set of laboratory studies may be indicated for some patients in the diagnosis of chronic urticaria (...) in females. [ ] Patients with chronic urticaria have a strong association with HLA-DR4 and the associated allele HLA-DQ8 compared with a control population. [ ] Previous Next: Prognosis The primary manifestations of urticaria are rash and pruritus. The course of the disease is unpredictable, and it may last months to years. About 50% of patients experience remission within 1 year. [ ] Only rarely does permanent hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation occur. The only long-term consequences of chronic

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Urticaria, Chronic (Overview)

may be pale to red (depending on background skin color) Lesions can be localized or generalized Lesions may be round, oval, annular, arcuate, serpiginous, or generalized Lesions resolve without postinflammatory pigmentary changes or scaling See for more detail. Diagnosis The diagnosis of chronic urticaria is largely clinical and based on a thorough history and physical examination. A limited set of laboratory studies may be indicated for some patients in the diagnosis of chronic urticaria (...) in females. [ ] Patients with chronic urticaria have a strong association with HLA-DR4 and the associated allele HLA-DQ8 compared with a control population. [ ] Previous Next: Prognosis The primary manifestations of urticaria are rash and pruritus. The course of the disease is unpredictable, and it may last months to years. About 50% of patients experience remission within 1 year. [ ] Only rarely does permanent hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation occur. The only long-term consequences of chronic

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Pityriasis Alba (Overview)

. The condition is not contagious, and no infectious agent has been identified. Leading theories as to the origin of the lesions in pityriasis alba involve atopy and postinflammatory changes, with a large number of patients with pityriasis alba having a history of atopic disease, and atopic patients are being more prone to developing the condition. [ , ] Theories of origin also include hypopigmentation secondary to pityriacitrin, a substance produced by Malassezia yeasts that acts as a natural sunscreen (...) . Lesions of pityriasis alba are usually bilateral and located on the face, arms, and neck. The hypopigmentation produced by pityriasis alba may take a year or longer to return to normal. This older patient with areas of hypopigmentation on the face has a common problem that would be included in the differential diagnosis of pityriasis alba. Several months earlier, he had areas of irritant contact dermatitis on his cheeks. When those resolved, he was left with areas of postinflammatory hypopigmentation

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

18. Pityriasis Rosea (Overview)

, especially in black people. Both postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation may occur. However, lesions do not result in scars. Bacterial superinfections may occur, but are rare. In pregnant women, pityriasis rosea is sometimes associated with miscarriage if occurring within the first 15 weeks of pregnancy, premature delivery, or neonatal hypotonia and hyporeactivity. [ , ] Previous Next: Patient Education Patients should be instructed to avoid contact with irritants. In addition, patients

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

19. Cutaneous Laser Resurfacing: Carbon Dioxide (Follow-up)

been shown to be effective against treating many of the same skin conditions as traditional ablative carbon dioxide lasers. Several studies have shown carbon dioxide fractional photothermolysis to be effective against rhytids, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, melasma, nevus of Ota, hypopigmented and hyperpigmented scars, dyschromia, laser-induced hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, and poikiloderma of Civatte. [ ] The ultrapulsed fractional carbon dioxide laser has been shown (...) pain and edema to pruritus and tightness. Mild complications sometimes occur and usually are of minimal consequence. Minor complications include milia formation, perioral dermatitis, acne and/or rosacea exacerbation, contact dermatitis, and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. Treatment with hydroquinone can effectively attenuate hyperpigmentation. Providers might consider the addition of serial glycolic acid peels in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types III-VI, as they are more prone to pigmentary

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (Diagnosis)

and toxic epidermal necrolysis and can affect 23-100% of these patients. [ ] Cutaneous complications can include the following: Postinflammatory dyspigmentation (hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation) Abnormal scarring Eruptive nevi Nail changes (onychomadesis, anonychia, pterygium formation, ridging, dystrophy, abnormal pigmentation) Telogen effluvium Alopecia areata Chronic pruritus Hyperhidrosis Photosensitivity Heterotopic ossification Disseminated ectopic sebaceous glands A 2017 article (...) and caused less discomfort to the patients. [ ] Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation changes are common and affect most Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis patients. It has been recommended that when an “anti-shear approach is undertaken and the detached skin is left in-situ” that the postinflammatory hyperpigmentation appears less severe. [ ] Previous References Mockenhaupt M. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: clinical patterns, diagnostic considerations

2014 eMedicine.com

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