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18 results for

Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA

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1. Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA

Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 (...) Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Aka: Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA , Cerebrovascular Accident of PICA , PICA CVA , Wallenberg Syndrome , Lateral Medullary Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology: Brainstem Tract Involvement Nucleus Ipsilateral facial pain and sensation loss Contralateral extremity pain and sense loss ( ) and difficulty swallowing ( ) Nulceus Solitarius loss Vestibular nucleus III. Findings: Signs and Symptoms

2018 FP Notebook

2. Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA

Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 (...) Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA Aka: Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery CVA , Cerebrovascular Accident of PICA , PICA CVA , Wallenberg Syndrome , Lateral Medullary Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology: Brainstem Tract Involvement Nucleus Ipsilateral facial pain and sensation loss Contralateral extremity pain and sense loss ( ) and difficulty swallowing ( ) Nulceus Solitarius loss Vestibular nucleus III. Findings: Signs and Symptoms

2015 FP Notebook

3. Posterior Circulation

Circulation Aka: Posterior Circulation , Basilar Artery , Vertebral Artery , Basilar Apex , Vertebrobasilar Artery , Vertebrobasilar Junction , Anterior Spinal Artery , Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery , Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery , Superior Cerebellar Artery , Posterior Cerebral Artery , Posterior Communicating Artery II. Anatomy Posterior Circulation Main Source: Two Vertebral Artery l arteries combine to form Basilar Artery Basilar Artery divides to form posterior cerebral arteries (...) Function Supplies , inferior , and III. Pathophysiology: Cerebrovascular Accident Vertebrobasilar obstruction may result in , or effects See Vertebrobasilar CVA See See Basilar Artery obstruction near the Vertebral Artery junction Results in complete cortical blindness (bilateral infarcts) Cerebellar artery obstruction Affects and Vertebral Artery obstruction May lack physical findings due to collateral circulation IV. References Gilman (1989) Manter and Gatz Essentials of and Neurophysiology, Davis, p

2018 FP Notebook

4. Posterior Circulation

Circulation Aka: Posterior Circulation , Basilar Artery , Vertebral Artery , Basilar Apex , Vertebrobasilar Artery , Vertebrobasilar Junction , Anterior Spinal Artery , Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery , Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery , Superior Cerebellar Artery , Posterior Cerebral Artery , Posterior Communicating Artery II. Anatomy Posterior Circulation Main Source: Two Vertebral Artery l arteries combine to form Basilar Artery Basilar Artery divides to form posterior cerebral arteries (...) Function Supplies , inferior , and III. Pathophysiology: Cerebrovascular Accident Vertebrobasilar obstruction may result in , or effects See Vertebrobasilar CVA See See Basilar Artery obstruction near the Vertebral Artery junction Results in complete cortical blindness (bilateral infarcts) Cerebellar artery obstruction Affects and Vertebral Artery obstruction May lack physical findings due to collateral circulation IV. References Gilman (1989) Manter and Gatz Essentials of and Neurophysiology, Davis, p

2015 FP Notebook

6. Clinical practice guideline on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

treatment with low-dose aspirin to reduce the risk of thrombosis. B In patients with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome with venous thrombosis, we recommend anticoagulation with a target INR 2.0-3.0. C In patients with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome with arterial thrombosis, we suggest anticoagulation with a target INR >3.0, or combining anticoagulants with INR 2.0-3.0 + low-dose aspirin. C In patients with SLE, antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombotic episodes, we suggest indefinite anticoagulation (...) recommend performing a series of ultrasound examinations similar to the following, always subject to the obstetrician’s criterion: - Week 8-9: Pregnancy confirmation ultrasound. - Week 12: Ultrasound for triple screening of chromosomopathies. During this week, a first Doppler study of uterine arteries may be carried out in order to estimate the probability of preeclampsia in women at risk (those who test positive to antiphospholipid antibodies, have a history of nephritis, preeclampsia and/or high blood

2015 GuiaSalud

8. Family Practice Notebook Updates 2017

(e.g. , cerebellar artery) may have low NIH Stroke Score particularly underestimates deficits from cerebellar strokes CTA Head and Neck identifies large vessel and can help inform decision V. Updates: September 2017 (ortho, peds) Evaluation includes , gait exam, limb asymmetry as well as , may be caused by , , may be caused by , and Angular variations include and ing (cv, procedure, ) Stress testing is uncommonly indicated in asymptomatic patients aside from vascular surgery preop, vigorous (...) with CAD Risk <7.5% (gyn, ) Surgical arsenal includes MRgFUS and IR embolization, as well as the traditional or myomectomy Medical management has changed little (still s, IUD, s) is an interesting option given its other uses ( in ) (lung, peds, ) Supportive care, nasal suctioning and maintain hydration (all other measures e.g. nebs, steroids, are defunct) (ent, vestibular) Distinguish triggered episodic VS spontaneous episodic VS continuous ( ) Critical to consider posterior CVA in (continuous

2018 FP Notebook

9. Spinal Cord Anatomy

Exits the spinal cord via the anterior root (at the anterior horn of the grey matter) VI. Components: Blood supply (1) Supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal column Arises inferior to the from the 2 l arteries Posterior spinal arteries (2) Supplies the posterior one third of the spinal column (in combination with intercostal arteries) Arises variably from the l arteries or posterior inferior cerebellar arteries VII. Associated Conditions (Lou Gehrig's Disease) Anterior horns of grey matter (...) to the Posterior Columns (and to the posterior root entry) Transmits sensory signals similar to the typically described Posterior Columns (gracilis and cuneatus) Transmits proprioception, stereognosis, vibration (and light touch) Spinocerebellar Tract (sensory, lateral cord) Transmits UNCONSCIOUS proprioception sensation (e.g. walking) Does not cross the midline (unlike all other sensory tracts) Courses to the ipsilateral (same side) via the superior and inferior peduncles Corticospinal tract (motor, lateral

2018 FP Notebook

10. Family Practice Notebook Updates 2017

(e.g. , cerebellar artery) may have low NIH Stroke Score particularly underestimates deficits from cerebellar strokes CTA Head and Neck identifies large vessel and can help inform decision V. Updates: September 2017 (ortho, peds) Evaluation includes , gait exam, limb asymmetry as well as , may be caused by , , may be caused by , and Angular variations include and ing (cv, procedure, ) Stress testing is uncommonly indicated in asymptomatic patients aside from vascular surgery preop, vigorous (...) with CAD Risk <7.5% (gyn, ) Surgical arsenal includes MRgFUS and IR embolization, as well as the traditional or myomectomy Medical management has changed little (still s, IUD, s) is an interesting option given its other uses ( in ) (lung, peds, ) Supportive care, nasal suctioning and maintain hydration (all other measures e.g. nebs, steroids, are defunct) (ent, vestibular) Distinguish triggered episodic VS spontaneous episodic VS continuous ( ) Critical to consider posterior CVA in (continuous

2018 FP Notebook

13. Stroke, Ischemic (Diagnosis)

to the posterior and medial temporal lobes and occipital lobes. (See Table 1, below.) The cerebellar hemispheres are supplied as follows: Inferiorly by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), arising from the vertebral artery (see the image below) Frontal projection from a right vertebral artery angiogram illustrates the posterior circulation. The vertebral arteries join to form the basilar artery. The posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICAs) arise from the distal vertebral arteries (...) . The anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICAs) arise from the proximal basilar artery. The superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs) arise distally from the basilar artery prior to its bifurcation into the posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs). Superiorly by the superior cerebellar artery Anterolaterally by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), from the basilar artery Table 1. Vascular Supply to the Brain VASCULAR TERRITORY Structures Supplied Anterior Circulation (Carotid) Anterior Cerebral Artery

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

14. Stroke, Ischemic (Overview)

to the posterior and medial temporal lobes and occipital lobes. (See Table 1, below.) The cerebellar hemispheres are supplied as follows: Inferiorly by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), arising from the vertebral artery (see the image below) Frontal projection from a right vertebral artery angiogram illustrates the posterior circulation. The vertebral arteries join to form the basilar artery. The posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICAs) arise from the distal vertebral arteries (...) . The anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICAs) arise from the proximal basilar artery. The superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs) arise distally from the basilar artery prior to its bifurcation into the posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs). Superiorly by the superior cerebellar artery Anterolaterally by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), from the basilar artery Table 1. Vascular Supply to the Brain VASCULAR TERRITORY Structures Supplied Anterior Circulation (Carotid) Anterior Cerebral Artery

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

15. Perampanel (Fycompa)

to a cerebrovascular accident that occurred 14 days after discontinuing a 3 day course of exposure to perampanel 2 mg in a patient with a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus; “general physical health deterioration”/”old age” in a 72 y.o. Parkinson’s disease patient treated with perampanel for 813 days in an OLE study in addition to 84 days in a DB study; sudden worsening of cardiorespiratory function on Day 892 in a 53 y.o. male with Parkinson’s disease and a history (...) of hypertension and possible left atrial enlargement who had only 1 other AE recorded (drowsiness); cardiac failure on Day 74 in a 79 y.o. male with a past medical history including hypertension who developed acute myocardial infarct requiring coronary artery stenting and cardiac failure while on placebo in the DB study 301; and cardiopulmonary failure on Day 356 in a 77 y.o. male with Parkinson’s disease with a history of bronchietasis, atherosclerosis, and hypercholesterolemia who had received perampanel

2012 FDA - Drug Approval Package

16. Spinal Cord Anatomy

Exits the spinal cord via the anterior root (at the anterior horn of the grey matter) VI. Components: Blood supply (1) Supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal column Arises inferior to the from the 2 l arteries Posterior spinal arteries (2) Supplies the posterior one third of the spinal column (in combination with intercostal arteries) Arises variably from the l arteries or posterior inferior cerebellar arteries VII. Associated Conditions (Lou Gehrig's Disease) Anterior horns of grey matter (...) to the Posterior Columns (and to the posterior root entry) Transmits sensory signals similar to the typically described Posterior Columns (gracilis and cuneatus) Transmits proprioception, stereognosis, vibration (and light touch) Spinocerebellar Tract (sensory, lateral cord) Transmits UNCONSCIOUS proprioception sensation (e.g. walking) Does not cross the midline (unlike all other sensory tracts) Courses to the ipsilateral (same side) via the superior and inferior peduncles Corticospinal tract (motor, lateral

2015 FP Notebook

17. Cranial Nerve Lesions

, accelerated hypertension). Oculomotor (III) nerve Anatomy . This nerve emerges from the brainstem on the medial aspect of the crus cerebri and then passes forwards between the posterior cerebral and superior cerebellar arteries, very close to the posterior communicating artery. It pierces the dura near the edge of the tentorium cerebelli, and passes through the lateral part of the cavernous sinus with the IV and VI nerves to enter the orbit. Signs . The initial sign is often a fixed dilated pupil which (...) doesn't accommodate; then develops and then a complete internal ophthalmoplegia (masked by ptosis). Unopposed lateral rectus causes outward deviation of the eye. If the ocular sympathetic fibres are also affected behind the orbit, the pupil will be fixed but not dilated. Causes of a single III lesion . Diabetes mellitus, giant cell arteritis, syphilis, posterior communicating artery aneurysm, idiopathic; raised ICP if causes uncal herniation through the tentorium - this compresses the nerve. Third

2008 Mentor

18. Is isolated vertigo a common presentation of stroke in an elderly patient with cardiovascular risk factors?

subsequently developed an anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarct. BAEP testing might lead to early recognition of those patients at risk for catastrophic stroke, and prompt appropriate investigation and treatment to prevent this outcome.” [4] Carol Bauer’s article refers to isolated vertigo as a presenting symptom: “ In vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) insufficiency, vertigo is sudden in onset, lasts only minutes, is associated with nausea and vomiting, and is usually accompanied by a range (...) of vertigo. E-Medicine. November 2004. ( ). 6. Rathore S, Hinn A and Cooper L et al. Characterization of incident stroke signs and symptoms: findings from the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Stroke. 2002 Nov;33(11):2718-21. ( ). 7. Rubenstein R, Norman D, and Schindler R et al. Cerebellar infarction--a presentation of vertigo. Laryngoscope. 1980 Mar;90(3):505-14. ( ). 8. Masson C, Sterkers O, Chaigne P, et al. [Isolated vertigo disclosing infarction in the area of the posterior and inferior

2006 TRIP Answers

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