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Posterior Cord Syndrome

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1. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with spinal cord involvement but without hemisphere lesions: A case report. (PubMed)

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with spinal cord involvement but without hemisphere lesions: A case report. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was termed by Hinchey in 1996. Patients have a reversible vasogenic brain edema in imaging and acute neurological symptoms such as headache, seizures, encephalopathy, and visual disturbances when suffering from hypertension, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, renal failure, immunosuppressive medications, autoimmune disorders, sepsis (...) , thrombocytopaenia, hypocalcaemia, alcohol withdrawal, and many other potential causes. de Havenon A et al have proposed a new syndrome named PRES with spinal cord involvement (PRES-SCI). The patients with PRES-SCI have similar symptoms these of PRES. Patients have neurologic signs with the spinal cord involved and lesions in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) extending to the cervicomedullary junction, usually with extreme elevation in blood pressure and a history of hypertensive retinopathy. We administrated

2019 Medicine

2. Can vitamin B12 deficiency manifest with acute posterolateral or posterior cord syndrome? (PubMed)

Can vitamin B12 deficiency manifest with acute posterolateral or posterior cord syndrome? Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause varied neurological manifestations which are subacute to chronic in onset. Subacute combined degeneration of spinal cord is one such characteristic neurological manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. We report a case series of five patients who presented with acute onset (<15 days) neurological manifestations due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Detailed history and clinical (...) examination along with appropriate relevant investigations were done in all patients. Out of the five, two cases were of useless hand syndrome due to involvement of posterior column of the cervical spinal cord, another two patients presented with acute posterolateral cord syndrome causing gait ataxia and one acute posterior cord syndrome presented with acute sensory gait ataxia. Laboratory investigations were compatible with the diagnosis of cobalamin deficiency in all cases. All cases improved after

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2016 Spinal cord series and cases

3. Posterior Cord Syndrome and Trace Elements Deficiency as an Uncommon Presentation of Common Variable Immunodeficiency (PubMed)

Posterior Cord Syndrome and Trace Elements Deficiency as an Uncommon Presentation of Common Variable Immunodeficiency Diarrhea is one of the most common symptoms in common variable immunodeficiency, but neurologic manifestations are rare. We presented a 50-year-old woman with recurrent diarrhea and severe weight loss that developed a posterior cord syndrome. Endoscopy found a duodenal villous blunting, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and lack of plasma cells and magnetic resonance imaging (...) of the spine was normal. Laboratory assays confirmed common variable immunodeficiency syndrome and showed low levels of trace elements (copper and zinc). Treatment was initiated with parenteral replacement of trace elements and intravenous human immunoglobulin and the patient improved clinically. In conclusion, physicians must be aware that gastrointestinal and neurologic disorders may be related to each other and remember to request trace elements laboratory assessment.

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2017 Case reports in medicine

4. Spinal cord involvement in two children with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PubMed)

Spinal cord involvement in two children with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome Spinal cord involvement (SCI) is a rare feature of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), especially in children. SCI is generally symptomatic, and may have a different outcome compared with encephalic localization of PRES. We reported about two cases of SCI in pediatric patients with PRES, after multimodal anticancer therapies, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and targeted agents.

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2017 CNS oncology

5. Spinal cord involvement and contrast enhancement in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PubMed)

Spinal cord involvement and contrast enhancement in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a widely encountered clinicoradiological entity, spinal cord involvement on MRI is very rarely reported. We found only eight cases that have been reported so far. Reports of post-contrast meningeal or parenchymal enhancement in PRES are even rarer. Herein we report a case of PRES with extensive spinal cord signal abnormality

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2016 BJR | case reports

6. Posterior Cord Syndrome

Posterior Cord Syndrome Posterior Cord Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Posterior Cord Syndrome Posterior Cord (...) Syndrome Aka: Posterior Cord Syndrome , Posterior Spinal Cord Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Causes Posterior spinal artery injury resulting in posterior cord ischemia or infarction III. Signs Proprioception and vibration sensation loss (below injury level) as well as pain and sensation are spared IV. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Posterior Cord Syndrome." Click on the image (or right click) to open

2018 FP Notebook

7. Extragonadal germ cell tumor of the posterior mediastinum in a child complicated with spinal cord compression: a case report. (PubMed)

Extragonadal germ cell tumor of the posterior mediastinum in a child complicated with spinal cord compression: a case report. Germ cell tumors (GCTs) in children are rare neoplasms with diverse pathological findings according to the site and age of presentation. The most common symptoms in children with mediastinal GCTs, which are nonspecific, are dyspnea, chest pain, cough, hemoptysis, vena cava occlusion syndrome, and fatigue/weakness. Because of these nonspecific symptoms, it is difficult (...) to suspect a mediastinal mass. A posterior mediastinal tumor causing spinal cord compression is an important example of an oncologic emergency arising from a neurogenic tumor.Children with posterior mediastinum GCTs can be easily mistaken as having a neurogenic tumor because of site of tumor origin. We treated our 7-year-old patient with emergency decompression surgery and high-dose steroid pulse therapy to prevent secondary injury to the spinal cord. Primary injury was a result of spinal cord

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2018 BMC Pediatrics

8. Posterior arthrodesis of C1-C3 for the stabilization of multiple unstable upper cervical fractures with spinal cord compromise: A case report and literature review. (PubMed)

Posterior arthrodesis of C1-C3 for the stabilization of multiple unstable upper cervical fractures with spinal cord compromise: A case report and literature review. Multiple fractures of the atlas and axis are rare. The management of multiple fragment axis fractures and unstable atlas fractures is still challenging for the spinal surgeon. There are no published reports of similar fractures with 3-part fracture of axis associated with an unstable atlas fracture.We present a patient (...) . The patient was diagnosed as multiple unstable upper cervical fractures with spinal cord compromise. We performed posterior arthrodesis of C1-C3. Postoperatively, the patient showed neurological improvement, and C1-C3 had fused at the 3-month follow-up.Posterior arthrodesis of C1-C3 could provide a stable fixation for the 3 parts of axis (an odontoid type IIA fracture and traumatic spondylolisthesis of C2-C3) combined an unstable atlas fracture. Both the patient and the doctor were satisfied

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2017 Medicine

9. Concomitant Fahr's syndrome and thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament caused by idiopathic hypoparathyroidism - case report. (PubMed)

Concomitant Fahr's syndrome and thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament caused by idiopathic hypoparathyroidism - case report. Fahr's syndrome presenting multiple and symmetric calcification of basal ganglia and cerebral cortex is rare, and idiopathic hypoparatyroidism is known as one of the causes. The relationship between ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and idiopathic hypoparatyroidism is also reported in a few cases. Here, we report a patient (...) presenting concomitant Fahr's syndrome and thoracic OPLL developed by idiopathic hypoparatyroidism.53-year-old female patient presented myelopathic sign including gait disturbance and both leg weakness (Grade 3) for 4 months after slip down, and has the history of anti-epileptic medication for several years. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cord compression by the mixed-type OPLL from T5 to T9, and decompressive surgery was planned. Sudden onset generalized tonic-clonic seizure attack developed before

2019 BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

10. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome With Isolated Involving Infratentorial Structures (PubMed)

syndrome. A relatively high rate of hydrocephalus and spinal cord involvement can be a distinctive feature of this kind of variant. Symptoms and outcomes are basically similar to typical posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. (...) Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome With Isolated Involving Infratentorial Structures Typical neuroimaging findings of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome include symmetrical white matter edema in subcortical white matter of bilateral occipital and parietal lobes, although variations do occur and more and more attention is being focused upon disease of infratentorial-isolated involved posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. In this article, we described 1 case

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

11. White cord syndrome: A devastating complication of spinal decompression surgery (PubMed)

with lower limb paraparesis. She underwent an uneventful tumor excision accompanied by posterior cervical decompression and fusion. Postoperatively, she was quadriplegic and required ventilator support. The emergent postoperative MR scan revealed focal hyperintensity on the T2-weighted image consistent with spinal cord edema extending into the lower brain stem.Very few cases of reperfusion injury of the cervical spinal cord or "white cord syndrome" are described in the literature. Here we present (...) White cord syndrome: A devastating complication of spinal decompression surgery Reperfusion injury of the spinal cord or "white cord syndrome" refers to the sudden onset of neurological deterioration after spinal decompressive surgery. Associated magnetic resonance (MR) findings only include focal hyperintensity on T2-weighted images without any other pathological changes.A patient with cervical stenosis secondary to metastatic tumor in the intradural and extradural compartments presented

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2018 Surgical neurology international

12. Spinal cord compression

-Sequard's syndrome anterior cord syndrome posterior cord syndrome age between 16 and 30 years and male sex trauma tumour osteoporosis high-risk occupation high-risk recreational activities intravenous drug use immunosuppression Diagnostic investigations MRI spine gadolinium-enhanced MRI spine plain spine x-ray CT spine CT myelography full blood count with differential erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein blood or cerebrospinal fluid cultures tumour biopsy and histopathology urodynamic (...) of symptoms back pain numbness or paraesthesias weakness or paralysis bladder or bowel dysfunction hyper-reflexia sensory loss muscle weakness or wasting loss of tone below level of suspected injury (spinal shock) hypotension and bradycardia (neurogenic shock) complete cord transection syndrome cauda equina syndrome central cord syndrome history of malignancy immunosuppression intravenous drug use loss of rectal sphincter reflex loss of appendicular reflexes local deformity of spine on palpation Brown

2018 BMJ Best Practice

13. Malignant Spinal Cord Compression

of sphincter control is a late sign with a poor prognosis. Cauda equina syndrome Compression of lumbosacral nerve roots below the level of the cord itself results in a different clinical picture. New, severe root pain affecting low back, buttocks, perineum, thighs, legs. Loss of sensation often with tingling or numbness in the saddle area. Leg weakness, often asymmetrical. Bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction; occur earlier than in cord compression. Loss of anal reflex. Management Emergency referral (...) Malignant Spinal Cord Compression Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines - Malignant spinal cord compression Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines search / / / Malignant spinal cord compression Malignant spinal cord compression Introduction Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) occurs when the dural sac and its contents are compressed at the level of the cord or cauda equina. This may be as a result of direct pressure, vertebral collapse or instability caused by metastatic spread or by direct

2018 Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines

14. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with spinal cord involvement. (PubMed)

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with spinal cord involvement. To characterize a cohort of patients with the signs and symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), but with clinical and radiologic involvement of the spinal cord.We report 2 cases of PRES with spinal cord involvement and identified an additional 6 cases in the Medline database using various search terms related to "spinal PRES," "spinal reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (...) lesions on follow-up imaging. A total of 4 of 8 patients had symptoms referable to the spinal cord lesions and only 1 of 8 had a seizure.In light of the already wide definition of PRES, we propose a new syndrome named PRES with spinal cord involvement (PRES-SCI). Clinicians should suspect PRES-SCI when patients with PRES have neurologic signs referable to the spinal cord, extreme elevation in blood pressure, MRI lesions that extend to the cervicomedullary junction, or grade IV hypertensive retinopathy

2014 Neurology

15. Chiari type I malformation with occult tethered cord syndrome in a child: A case report. (PubMed)

Chiari type I malformation with occult tethered cord syndrome in a child: A case report. Chiari type I malformation (CM1) and occult tethered cord syndrome (OTCS) are considered to be malformations associated with subtle structural abnormalities of the terminal filum. Few studies have reported patients with CM1 and OTCS. Treatment strategy for patients of CM1 associated with OTCS is controversial.A 14-year-old child was admitted with intermittent pain and numbness in the right upper limb (...) . And he had urinary frequency, neck pain, back pain, and numbness simultaneously. The imaging examinations showed CM1, syringomyelia, small fat in the filum at the level of the L2 vertebral body but the conus medullaris at the aspect of the L1 vertebral body.The child was diagnosed with CM1 associated with OTCS.Patient underwent sectioning of filum terminale (SFT) under electrophysiological monitoring during the first hospital and posterior fossa decompression (PFD) during the second hospital.After

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2017 Medicine

16. Spinal Shortening for Recurrent Tethered Cord Syndrome via a Lateral Retropleural Approach: A Novel Operative Technique (PubMed)

Spinal Shortening for Recurrent Tethered Cord Syndrome via a Lateral Retropleural Approach: A Novel Operative Technique Spine shortening via vertebral osteotomy (SSVO) for recurrent tethered cord syndrome (TCS) is a novel surgical technique that avoids the complication profile associated with revision detethering. While SSVO has previously been described via a posterior approach, we describe a lateral retropleural approach for SSVO in recurrent TCS in a 21-year-old female. Our patient presented (...) neurologic baseline postoperatively. At the six-month follow-up, the patient reported decreased lower extremity radicular pain and improved bowel and bladder function. This operative report demonstrates that SSVO via a lateral retropleural approach is a viable treatment for the recurrence of TCS. The advantages of this minimally invasive approach compared to the posterior approach are direct access to the vertebral body and disc space, avoiding the need to operate around the spinal cord. Further studies

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2017 Cureus

17. Management of Acute Traumatic Central Cord Syndrome (ATCCS)

Management of Acute Traumatic Central Cord Syndrome (ATCCS) We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Management of Acute Traumatic Central Cord Syndrome (ATCCS) | Neurosurgery | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article (...) navigation March 2013 Article Contents Article Navigation Management of Acute Traumatic Central Cord Syndrome (ATCCS) Bizhan Aarabi, MD, FRCSC *Department of Neurosurgery, and University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland Search for other works by this author on: Mark N. Hadley, MD ‡Division of Neurological Surgery, and Children's Hospital of Alabama, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama † Correspondence: Mark N. Hadley, MD, FACS, UAB Division of Neurological Surgery, 510 –20 th Street

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2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

18. CRACKCast E106 – Spinal Cord

cord/aortic arch surgery Global ischemic states Systemic lupus Vasculitis Cryptogenic Presents with an anterior spinal cord syndrome. Proprioception, vibration and light touch usually preserved (posterior column). [9] List 5 RFs for spinal epidural abscess. And list 4 common bacteria implication in epidural abscess Risk factors: Diabetes Injection drug use Chronic renal failure Alcoholism Immunosuppression Recent infection Usually the infection is spread from a hematogenous source → either epidural (...) horn of the spinal cord, and the posterior root contains sensory neurons and fibers that convey sensory inflow.” – Rosen’s 9 th Edition, Chapter 96 Check out: for some awesome anatomy pics all in one spot! [1] Describe the arterial supply of the spinal cord See “The arterial supply of the spinal cord is derived primarily from two sources. The single anterior spinal artery arises from the paired vertebral arteries. This anterior spinal artery runs the entire length of the cord in the midline

2017 CandiEM

19. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Resolving Within 48 Hours in a Normotensive Patient Who Underwent Thoracic Spine Surgery (PubMed)

Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Resolving Within 48 Hours in a Normotensive Patient Who Underwent Thoracic Spine Surgery Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) usually manifests with severe headaches, seizures, and visual disturbances due to uncontrollable hypertension. A patient (age in the early 60s) with a history of renal cell cancer presented with lower-extremity weakness and paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine revealed a T8 (...) vertebral body metastatic lesion with cord compression at that level. The patient underwent preoperative embolization of the tumor followed by posterior resection and placement of percutaneous pedicle screws and rods. Postoperatively, the patient experienced decreased visual acuity bilaterally. Abnormal MRI findings consisted of T2 hyperintense lesions and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery changes in both occipital lobes, consistent with the unique brain imaging pattern associated with PRES

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2016 Journal of clinical medicine research

20. Acute visual loss in a patient with spinal cord injury (PubMed)

Acute visual loss in a patient with spinal cord injury Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), especially those with injury at and above T6, are prone to transient episodes of hypertension induced by noxious triggers below the level of SCI, known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD). An uncommonly reported presentation of AD is posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).A 50-year-old male with the history of paraplegia from SCI presented with sepsis secondary to baclofen pump and urinary

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2017 Spinal cord series and cases

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