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Positive Pressure Ventilation

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1. Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for preterm neonates after extubation. (PubMed)

Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for preterm neonates after extubation. Previous randomised trials and meta-analyses have shown that nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is a useful method for providing respiratory support after extubation. However, this treatment sometimes 'fails' in infants, and they may require endotracheal re-intubation with its attendant risks and expense. Nasal intermittent (...) positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) can augment NCPAP by delivering ventilator breaths via nasal prongs. Older children and adults with chronic respiratory failure benefit from NIPPV, and the technique has been applied to neonates. However, serious side effects including gastric perforation have been reported with older methods of providing NIPPV.Primary objective To compare effects of management with NIPPV versus NCPAP on the need for additional ventilatory support in preterm infants whose

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2017 Cochrane

2. Early nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for preterm infants. (PubMed)

Early nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for preterm infants. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is a strategy for maintaining positive airway pressure throughout the respiratory cycle through the application of bias flow of respiratory gas to an apparatus attached to the nose. Treatment with NCPAP is associated with decreased risk of mechanical ventilation and might be effective in reducing (...) chronic lung disease. Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is a form of noninvasive ventilation during which patients are exposed intermittently to higher levels of airway pressure, along with NCPAP through the same nasal device.To examine the risks and benefits of early NIPPV versus early NCPAP alone for preterm infants at risk of or in respiratory distress within the first hours after birth.Primary endpoints are respiratory failure and the need for intubated ventilatory support

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2016 Cochrane

3. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation for prevention of complications after pulmonary resection in lung cancer patients. (PubMed)

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation for prevention of complications after pulmonary resection in lung cancer patients. Pulmonary complications are often seen during the postoperative period following lung resection for patients with lung cancer. Some situations such as intubation, a long stay in the intensive care unit, the high cost of antibiotics and mortality may be avoided with the prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV (...) intubation rates and there was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups (RR 0.55; 95% CI 0.25 to 1.20). Five studies reported measures of mortality on completion of the intervention period. There was no statistical difference between the groups for this outcome (RR 0.60; 95% CI 0.24 to 1.53). Similar results were observed in the subgroup analysis considering ventilatory mode (bi-level versus continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). No study evaluated the postoperative use

2019 Cochrane

4. Positive end-expiratory pressure for preterm infants requiring conventional mechanical ventilation for respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia. (PubMed)

Positive end-expiratory pressure for preterm infants requiring conventional mechanical ventilation for respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) is a common therapy for neonatal respiratory failure. While CMV facilitates gas exchange, it may simultaneously injure the lungs. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has received less attention than other ventilation parameters when considering this benefit-risk balance. While (...) an appropriate PEEP level may result in clinical benefits, both inappropriately low or high levels may cause harm. An appropriate PEEP level may also be best achieved by an individualized approach.1. To compare the effects of PEEP levels in preterm infants requiring CMV for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). We compare both: zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) (0 cm H2O) versus any PEEP and low (< 5 cm H2O) vs high (≥ 5 cm H2O) PEEP.2. To compare the effects of PEEP levels in preterm infants requiring CMV

2019 Cochrane

5. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (CPAP or bilevel NPPV) for cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. (PubMed)

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (CPAP or bilevel NPPV) for cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) has been used to treat respiratory distress due to acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis update on NPPV for adults presenting with ACPE.To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of NPPV compared to standard medical care (SMC) for adults with ACPE. The primary outcome was hospital mortality (...) restrictions.We included blinded or unblinded randomised controlled trials in adults with ACPE. Participants had to be randomised to NPPV (continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel NPPV) plus standard medical care (SMC) compared with SMC alone.Two review authors independently screened and selected articles for inclusion. We extracted data with a standardised data collection form. We evaluated the risks of bias of each study using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool. We assessed evidence quality

2019 Cochrane

8. ProSeal versus Classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for positive pressure ventilation in adults undergoing elective surgery. (PubMed)

ProSeal versus Classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for positive pressure ventilation in adults undergoing elective surgery. The development of supraglottic airway devices has revolutionized airway management during general anaesthesia. Two devices are widely used in clinical practice to facilitate positive pressure ventilation: the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (pLMA) and the Classic laryngeal mask airway (cLMA). It is not clear whether these devices have important clinical differences in terms (...) of efficacy or complications.To compare the effectiveness of the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (pLMA) and the Classic LMA (cLMA) for positive pressure ventilation in adults undergoing elective surgery.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 3) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (Ovid SP, 1997 to April 2017); Embase (Ovid SP, 1997 to April 2017); the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1946 to April 2017); and the Cumulative Index to Nursing

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2017 Cochrane

9. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) vs noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) vs noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilation (NHFOV) as post-extubation support in preterm neonates: protocol for an assessor-blinded, multicenter, ra (PubMed)

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) vs noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) vs noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilation (NHFOV) as post-extubation support in preterm neonates: protocol for an assessor-blinded, multicenter, ra Various noninvasive respiratory support modalities are available in neonatal critical care in order to minimize invasive ventilation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the more commonly used but noninvasive positive pressure (...) ventilation (NIPPV) seems more efficacious in the early post-extubation phase, although it is not clear if NIPPV may influence longterm outcomes. A recently introduced alternative is noninvasive high frequency oscillatory ventilation (NHFOV) which might be especially useful in babies needing high constant distending pressure. Preterm neonates may receive these respiratory supports for several weeks. Nonetheless, no data are available for the longterm use of NIPPV and NHFOV; few data exist on NHFOV

2019 BMC Pediatrics

10. Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation Versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure to Prevent Primary Noninvasive Ventilation Failure in Extremely Low Birthweight Infants. (PubMed)

Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation Versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure to Prevent Primary Noninvasive Ventilation Failure in Extremely Low Birthweight Infants. Reducing the risk of primary noninvasive ventilation failure in extremely low birthweight infants is linked to reducing bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In a secondary analysis of randomized data, we identified that failure rates and time to failure were similar for nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (...) vs nasal continuous positive airway pressure.Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2019 Journal of Pediatrics

11. Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for preterm neonates after extubation. (PubMed)

Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for preterm neonates after extubation. Previous randomised trials and meta-analyses have shown nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) to be a useful method of respiratory support after extubation. However, infants managed in this way sometimes 'fail' and require endotracheal reintubation with its attendant risks and expense. Nasal intermittent positive pressure (...) tube removed following a period of intermittent positive pressure ventilation.To compare the rates of gastric distension, gastrointestinal perforation, necrotising enterocolitis, chronic lung disease, duration of hospitalisation, rates of apnoea, air leaks and mortality between NIPPV and NCPAP.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 7, 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to 4 September 2013), EMBASE (1980 to 4 September 2013), CINAHL (1982 week 3 to August 2013) and PubMed

2014 Cochrane

12. Effect of Titrating Positive End-Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) With an Esophageal Pressure-Guided Strategy vs an Empirical High PEEP-Fio2 Strategy on Death and Days Free From Mechanical Ventilation Among Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A R (PubMed)

Effect of Titrating Positive End-Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) With an Esophageal Pressure-Guided Strategy vs an Empirical High PEEP-Fio2 Strategy on Death and Days Free From Mechanical Ventilation Among Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A R Adjusting positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to offset pleural pressure might attenuate lung injury and improve patient outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).To determine whether PEEP titration guided by esophageal (...) pressure (PES), an estimate of pleural pressure, was more effective than empirical high PEEP-fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio2) in moderate to severe ARDS.Phase 2 randomized clinical trial conducted at 14 hospitals in North America. Two hundred mechanically ventilated patients aged 16 years and older with moderate to severe ARDS (Pao2:Fio2 ≤200 mm Hg) were enrolled between October 31, 2012, and September 14, 2017; long-term follow-up was completed July 30, 2018.Participants were randomized to PES

2019 JAMA

13. Randomised controlled trial: Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation should be considered in patients with COPD and persistent hypercapnia at least 2 weeks after resolution of acute respiratory failure

Randomised controlled trial: Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation should be considered in patients with COPD and persistent hypercapnia at least 2 weeks after resolution of acute respiratory failure Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation should be considered in patients with COPD and persistent hypercapnia at least 2 weeks after resolution of acute respiratory failure | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You (...) positive pressure ventilation should be considered in patients with COPD and persistent hypercapnia at least 2 weeks after resolution of acute respiratory failure Article Text Adult nursing Randomised controlled trial Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation should be considered in patients with COPD and persistent hypercapnia at least 2 weeks after resolution of acute respiratory failure Magnus Ekström Statistics from Altmetric.com Commendary on: Murphy PB, Rehal S, Arbane G, et al . Effect of home

2018 Evidence-Based Nursing

14. Extrinsic Positive End-Expiratory Pressure for Patients Requiring Ventilation: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines&quot;

Extrinsic Positive End-Expiratory Pressure for Patients Requiring Ventilation: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines" Extrinsic Positive End-Expiratory Pressure for Patients Requiring Ventilation: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines" | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Extrinsic Positive End-Expiratory Pressure for Patients Requiring Ventilation: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines" Extrinsic Positive End-Expiratory Pressure for Patients Requiring Ventilation: Clinical (...) Effectiveness and Guidelines" Published on: December 9, 2015 Project Number: RB0943-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of extrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure for ventilation of patients without severe obstructive respiratory diseases? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of extrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure for ventilation of patients without severe

2016 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

15. Randomized Control Trial: Synchronized Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation Versus Non Synchronized Non Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

Randomized Control Trial: Synchronized Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation Versus Non Synchronized Non Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants Randomized Control Trial: Synchronized Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation Versus Non Synchronized Non Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration (...) or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Randomized Control Trial: Synchronized Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation Versus Non Synchronized Non Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor

2018 Clinical Trials

16. Semi-recumbent position versus supine position for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in adults requiring mechanical ventilation. (PubMed)

Semi-recumbent position versus supine position for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in adults requiring mechanical ventilation. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is associated with increased mortality, prolonged length of hospital stay and increased healthcare costs in critically ill patients. Guidelines recommend a semi-recumbent position (30º to 45º) for preventing VAP among patients requiring mechanical ventilation. However, due to methodological limitations in existing (...) systematic reviews, uncertainty remains regarding the benefits and harms of the semi-recumbent position for preventing VAP.To assess the effectiveness and safety of semi-recumbent positioning versus supine positioning to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in adults requiring mechanical ventilation.We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 10), which includes the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE (1946 to October 2015), EMBASE (2010 to October 2015), CINAHL

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2016 Cochrane

17. Smaller facemasks for positive pressure ventilation in preterm infants: A randomised trial

Smaller facemasks for positive pressure ventilation in preterm infants: A randomised trial Facial measurements of preterm infants indicate that standard diameter facemasks used during positive pressure ventilation are too large, which may lead to mask leak and compromise resuscitation. We aimed to determine whether the use of a facemask that better complies with the dimensions of preterm faces, compared with a standard facemask, reduces facemask leak.Parallel group, randomised controlled trial (...) . Preterm infants ≤32 weeks' gestation receiving facemask ventilation prior to intubation in the neonatal intensive care unit, and those 28-32+6 weeks' receiving facemask ventilation in the delivery room were eligible. Infants were randomised to receive ventilation via a standard (50mm) (control), or a smaller (35mm or 42mm) diameter facemask (intervention), stratified by gestation (≤26 weeks'; 35mm, 27-32+6; 42mm). The primary outcome was leak between the mask and the infants face.Of 298 eligible

2019 EvidenceUpdates

18. Effect of Sustained Inflations vs Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death Among Extremely Preterm Infants: The SAIL Randomized Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Effect of Sustained Inflations vs Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death Among Extremely Preterm Infants: The SAIL Randomized Clinical Trial. Preterm infants must establish regular respirations at delivery. Sustained inflations may establish lung volume faster than short inflations.To determine whether a ventilation strategy including sustained inflations, compared with standard intermittent positive pressure ventilation, reduces bronchopulmonary (...) a prespecified review of adverse outcomes.The experimental intervention was up to 2 sustained inflations at maximal peak pressure of 25 cm H2O for 15 seconds using a T-piece and mask (n = 215); standard resuscitation was intermittent positive pressure ventilation (n = 211).The primary outcome was the rate of BPD or death at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. There were 27 prespecified secondary efficacy outcomes and 7 safety outcomes, including death at less than 48 hours.Among 460 infants randomized (mean [SD

2019 JAMA

19. Long-term clinical effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure therapy versus non-invasive ventilation therapy in patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome: a multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Long-term clinical effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure therapy versus non-invasive ventilation therapy in patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome: a multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is commonly treated with continuous positive airway pressure or non-invasive ventilation during sleep. Non-invasive ventilation is more complex and costly than continuous positive airway pressure but might be advantageous because (...) through an electronic database, to receive treatment with either non-invasive ventilation or continuous positive airway pressure. Both investigators and patients were aware of the treatment allocation. The research team was not involved in deciding hospital treatment, duration of treatment in the hospital, and adjustment of medications, as well as adjudicating cardiovascular events or cause of mortality. Treating clinicians from the routine care team were not aware of the treatment allocation

2019 Lancet

20. Randomized controlled trial comparing nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation and nasal continuous positive airway pressure in premature infants after tracheal extubation. (PubMed)

Randomized controlled trial comparing nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation and nasal continuous positive airway pressure in premature infants after tracheal extubation. To analyze the frequency of extubation failure in premature infants using conventional mechanical ventilation (MV) after extubation in groups subjected to nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (nIPPV) and continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP).Seventy-two premature infants with respiratory failure (...) were studied, with a gestational age (GA) ≤ 36 weeks and birth weight (BW) > 750 g, who required tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The study was controlled and randomized in order to ensure that the members of the groups used in the research were chosen at random. Randomization was performed at the time of extubation using sealed envelopes. Extubation failure was defined as the need for re-intubation and mechanical ventilation during the first 72 hours after extubation.Among the 36

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2016 Revista da Associacao Medica Brasileira (1992)

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