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Periumbilical Pain

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1. Abdominal Pain and Periumbilical Discoloration (PubMed)

Abdominal Pain and Periumbilical Discoloration 27788755 2018 03 09 2018 12 02 1866-0452 113 40 2016 Oct 07 Deutsches Arzteblatt international Dtsch Arztebl Int Abdominal Pain and Periumbilical Discoloration. 679 10.3238/arztebl.2016.0679 arztebl.2016.0679 Sayk Friedhelm F eng Case Reports Journal Article Germany Dtsch Arztebl Int 101475967 1866-0452 IM Abdominal Pain Humans Male Middle Aged Skin Pigmentation Umbilicus 2016 10 30 6 0 2018 3 10 6 0 2016 10 30 6 0 ppublish 27788755 arztebl

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2016 Deutsches Ärzteblatt international

2. Periumbilical Pain

Periumbilical Pain Periumbilical Pain Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Periumbilical Pain Periumbilical Pain Aka (...) : Periumbilical Pain , Periumbilical Abdominal Pain From Related Chapters II. Causes: Gastrointestinal Early (later radiates to right lower quadrant) or or mass III. Causes: Vascular Abdominal Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Periumbilical Pain." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Periumbilical pain (C1096624) Concepts Finding

2018 FP Notebook

3. Acute Abdomen with Periumbilical Erythema (PubMed)

Acute Abdomen with Periumbilical Erythema A 33-year-old man with a history of a Malone Antegrade Continence Enema Procedure presented to the Emergency Department with right lower abdominal pain. Computed Tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed an appendicitis of the appendicostomy with an associated appendicolith.

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2018 Journal of the Belgian Society of Radiology

4. Hand-Assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy PERiumbilical versus Pfannenstiel incision and return to normal physical ACTivity (HAPERPACT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (PubMed)

it takes for the donor to return to normal physical activity.This study was initiated in November 2017 and is expected to last for 2 years. To be eligible for the study, donors must be more than 20 years of age and must not be receiving permanent pain therapy. Only donors with a single artery and vein in the graft are being enrolled in this trial. Donors with infections or scars in the periumbilical or hypogastric area, bleeding disorders, chronic use of immunosuppressive agents, or active infection (...) will be excluded. Donors will be randomly allocated to either a control arm (periumbilical incision) or an intervention arm (Pfannenstiel incision). The sample size was calculated as 26 organ donors in each group. The primary endpoint is the number of days it takes the donor to return to normal physical activity (up to 4 weeks after the operation). Secondary endpoints are intraoperative outcomes, including estimated blood loss, warm ischemia time, and duration of the operation. Postoperative pain

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2018 Trials

5. Hand-assisted Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy Periumbilical Versus Pfannenstiel Incision

port placement. Pfannenstiel incisions improve wound complications such as incisional hernia, cosmetic issues, and wound dehiscence. However, duration of surgery, postoperative pain score, and length of hospital stay are significantly lower in donors with periumbilical incisions.To the best of our knowledge, these two types of incision have not been compared in a randomized controlled trial in patients undergoing HALDN. Our objective is to compare the results of Pfannenstiel incision (intervention (...) for hand-assisted port placement and kidney extraction. A periumbilical incision is made at the midline. In contrast, a Pfannenstiel incision is made as a slightly curved horizontal line just above the pubic symphysis. Pfannenstiel incisions improve wound complications, such as incisional hernia, cosmetic results, and wound dehiscence. However, the duration of surgery, postoperative pain score, and length of hospital stay were significantly lower in donors with periumbilical incision. The inserted hand

2017 Clinical Trials

6. Short and long-term outcomes of a randomised controlled trial of vertical periumbilical wound versus transverse left iliac fossa wound for specimen retrieval in laparoscopic anterior resections. (PubMed)

Short and long-term outcomes of a randomised controlled trial of vertical periumbilical wound versus transverse left iliac fossa wound for specimen retrieval in laparoscopic anterior resections. The ideal incision for laparoscopic specimen extraction is not known. There has been no randomised study thus far evaluating extraction site in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The aim of our study was to compare post-operative outcomes, pain scores and quality of life scores of vertical periumbilical (...) (VW) versus transverse left iliac fossa (TW) incisions for specimen extraction in laparoscopic anterior resections.Using an assumption of pain score of 5 in the VW group versus pain score of 2 in the TW group, on day one post-operatively, and based on a 80% statistical power of analysis to achieve a statistical difference with reduction in pain scores, the sample size per arm calculated was 16. Forty patients undergoing laparoscopic anterior resection were randomised to VW (n = 20) or TW (n = 20

2015 Surgical endoscopy

7. Periumbilical Pain

Periumbilical Pain Periumbilical Pain Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Periumbilical Pain Periumbilical Pain Aka (...) : Periumbilical Pain , Periumbilical Abdominal Pain From Related Chapters II. Causes: Gastrointestinal Early (later radiates to right lower quadrant) or or mass III. Causes: Vascular Abdominal Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Periumbilical Pain." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Periumbilical pain (C1096624) Concepts Finding

2015 FP Notebook

8. Short and long-term outcomes of a randomised controlled trial of vertical periumbilical wound versus transverse left iliac fossa wound for specimen retrieval in laparoscopic anterior resections. (PubMed)

Short and long-term outcomes of a randomised controlled trial of vertical periumbilical wound versus transverse left iliac fossa wound for specimen retrieval in laparoscopic anterior resections. The ideal incision for laparoscopic specimen extraction is not known. There has been no randomised study thus far evaluating extraction site in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The aim of our study was to compare post-operative outcomes, pain scores and quality of life scores of vertical periumbilical (...) (VW) versus transverse left iliac fossa (TW) incisions for specimen extraction in laparoscopic anterior resections.Using an assumption of pain score of 5 in the VW group versus pain score of 2 in the TW group, on day one post-operatively, and based on a 80% statistical power of analysis to achieve a statistical difference with reduction in pain scores, the sample size per arm calculated was 16. Forty patients undergoing laparoscopic anterior resection were randomised to VW (n = 20) or TW (n = 20

2014 Surgical endoscopy

9. Acute Nonlocalized Abdominal Pain

]. Although in a nonpregnant patient the pain may follow a more reliable pattern (periumbilical or right lower quadrant), the location of pain may not correlate with presence of appendicitis in pregnant patients [86]. US is frequently the first imaging modality used in this scenario. Refer to the ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® topic on “Right Lower Quadrant Pain–Suspected Appendicitis” for further discussion [12]. Other causes of nontraumatic abdominal pain in pregnant women include urinary tract (...) Acute Nonlocalized Abdominal Pain Revised 2018 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Acute Nonlocalized Abdominal Pain American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Acute Nonlocalized Abdominal Pain Variant 1: Acute nonlocalized abdominal pain and fever. No recent surgery. Initial imaging. Procedure Appropriateness Category Relative Radiation Level CT abdomen and pelvis with IV contrast Usually Appropriate ??? MRI abdomen and pelvis without and with IV contrast May Be Appropriate O US

2018 American College of Radiology

10. Right Lower Quadrant Pain : Suspected Appendicitis

sets. Estimated dose reduction ranged from 23% to 61%. The probability of correct diagnosis in limited pelvic sets was 68% as compared with 78% for limited abdomen sets [20]. Discussion of Procedures by Variant Variant 1: Right lower quadrant pain, fever, leukocytosis. Suspected appendicitis. Initial imaging. The “classic” clinical presentation of patients with appendicitis consisted of periumbilical abdominal pain migrating to the RLQ, loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, with fever (...) Right Lower Quadrant Pain : Suspected Appendicitis Revised 2018 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Right Lower Quadrant Pain–Suspected Appendicitis American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Right Lower Quadrant Pain-Suspected Appendicitis Variant 1: Right lower quadrant pain, fever, leukocytosis. Suspected appendicitis. Initial imaging. Procedure Appropriateness Category Relative Radiation Level CT abdomen and pelvis with IV contrast Usually Appropriate ??? CT abdomen

2018 American College of Radiology

11. CRACKCast E027 – Abdominal Pain

autonomic nerves in the visceral peritoneum surrounding organs A result of gas, fluid, stretching, edema, blood, cysts, abscesses If the affected organ undergoes peristalsis, then the pain is usually intermittent, crampy and/or colicky in nature Pain follows the embryonic somatic segments: Upper, periumbilical, lower abdominal pain Foregut = upper pain = from stomach, duodenum, liver, pancreas Midgut = periumbilical pain = small bowel, proximal colon, appendix Hindgut = lower abdominal pain = distal (...) % mortality Mesenteric venous thrombosis – associated with hypercoagulable states Haematological, inflammation, trauma Types of lesions: Arterial occlusion – sudden / emboli / low flow atherosclerosis Symptoms: periumbilical then diffuse pain, with nausea and vomiting, at times postprandial. May have a normal exam Labs: Metabolic acidosis with lactic acidemia. NEED CT to diagnosis. Intestinal obstruction Peaks in infants and the elderly or post-operative Etiology: Adhesions , cancer, hernias, volvulus

2017 CandiEM

12. Diagnosis of Right Lower Quadrant Pain and Suspected Acute Appendicitis

Diagnosis of Right Lower Quadrant Pain and Suspected Acute Appendicitis Diagnosis of Right Lower Quadrant Pain and Suspected Acute Appendicitis Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 157 Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 157 Diagnosis of Right Lower Quadrant Pain and Suspected Acute Appendicitis Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2012-00012-I Prepared (...) . Diagnosis of Right Lower Quadrant Pain and Suspected Acute Appendicitis. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 157. (Prepared by the Brown Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2012-00012-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 15(16)-EHC025-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; December 2015. www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/reports/final.cfm .iii Preface The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), through its Evidence-based Practice Centers (EPCs), sponsors

2016 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

13. Abdominal wall Type-I complex regional pain syndrome treated effectively with peripheral nerve field stimulation: a case report (PubMed)

Abdominal wall Type-I complex regional pain syndrome treated effectively with peripheral nerve field stimulation: a case report Chronic abdominal wall pain is a well-documented complication of abdominal surgery. However, abdominal wall complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare medical condition. We present a case of abdominal wall CRPS and its treatment with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNfS). A 34-year-old female presented with right periumbilical pain for 2 years. She developed (...) burning, sharp and stabbing pain with allodynia (extremely sensitive to wind and light touch) and erythema or pallor 2 weeks after an exploratory appendectomy. The extensive evaluation ruled out the underlining pathology. After she failed conservative therapies, she underwent a 7-day trial of thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and abdominal wall PNfS. Thoracic SCS failed to provide pain relief; however, PNfS provided significant relief (>90%) of burning sensation. It has now been 5 years since

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2017 Journal of surgical case reports

14. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma Presenting as Abdominal Pain with a Pulsatile Mass (PubMed)

of periumbilical abdominal pain. Our patient presented with symptoms consistent with a symptomatic aortic aneurysm, but a mass was encountered during surgery. In such circumstances the diagnosis of malignant sarcoma must be kept in mind and attempts at full resection with tumor-free margins are necessary. (...) Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma Presenting as Abdominal Pain with a Pulsatile Mass Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare tumor that mostly involves adults aged 50 to 70. The most common anatomic location is the lower extremities. MFH of the retroperitoneum usually manifests late in its course and may be initially mistaken with other more common diagnosis. Here, the authors describe a 60-year-old man that was brought to the emergency department with a chief complaint

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2016 Case reports in surgery

15. Acute Pelvic Pain in Women

Unilateral Ruptured (left ) (right ) Radiation From periumbilical to RLQ Into inguinal region or groin Timing Mid-cycle pain Mittelschmerz Associated Symptoms: Miscellaneous including or Associated Symptoms: Urologic , urgency, hesitancy or Associated Symptoms: Gynecologic EctopicVaginal Pregnancy V. Exam: Focal findings or tubo-ovarian abscess Peritoneal signs or hemodynamic instability (surgical emergencies) Ruptured Ruptured Cervical motion tenderness (25% of cases) (50% of ectopic cases) and tubo (...) ) If MRI unavailable, (low exposure technique) may be considered for serious findings (if non-diagnostic) Large s s IX. Differential Diagnosis: Critical Causes of Acute Pelvic Pain and their most suggestive findings See Purulent endocervical discharge Abdominal Cervical motion tenderness (does not distinguish PID from or ) Pelvic with any non-cystic, extraovarian bHCG >1000 to 1500 mIU (or local discriminatory values) Pain location transitions from periumbilical area to right lower quadrant Abdominal X

2018 FP Notebook

16. Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome

) closely associated Parents (especially mothers) often have or VII. Associated Conditions VIII. Symptoms Nonspecific recurrent Typically periumbilical or epigastric, ill-defined pain Not related to meals Not related to movement or activity or may be present depending on type No IX. Signs Normal growth curves (or for age) Well appearing child Exam is often normal or mild abdominal tenderness Exam should include pelvic and scrotal exam in adolescents X. Signs: Red flags Pain location distant from (esp (...) Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Recurrent

2018 FP Notebook

17. Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. (PubMed)

Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. Although traditionally regarded as a specific pediatric disease, abdominal migraine may also be observed in adults. Unfortunately, however, this condition is frequently overlooked in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in the emergency department (ED). A 30-year-old woman presented to our ED complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting, lasting for 12 hours. The pain was periumbilical, continuous (...) excluded. In July 2012, she became pregnant, and she delivered a healthy baby on April 2013. Until November 2014, she has remained asymptomatic. Based on the clinical characteristics of the abdominal pain episodes, the exclusion of any alternative diagnosis, and the relief of symptoms during and after pregnancy, a final diagnosis of abdominal migraine could be established. A skilled emergency physician should always consider abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of patients admitted

2015 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

18. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain (PubMed)

paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively (...) Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately

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2015 Case reports in neurological medicine

19. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block for Pain Control Post-UFE

Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block for Pain Control Post-UFE Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block for Pain Control Post-UFE - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block (...) for Pain Control Post-UFE The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02270255 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : October 21, 2014 Last Update Posted : December 18, 2017 Sponsor: McGill University Health Center Information provided by (Responsible Party): Louis-martin Boucher, McGill

2014 Clinical Trials

20. An unusual cause of postcolonoscopy abdominal pain. (PubMed)

, and diagnosis of postcolonoscopy appendicitis. A 52-year-old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain 8 hours after an uncomplicated routine screening colonoscopy. He initially reported mild generalized abdominal discomfort which 3 hours after the procedure intensified and localized to the periumbilical region. Computed tomography of the abdomen with oral and intravenous contrast revealed appendicitis as the cause of his abdominal pain. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy (...) An unusual cause of postcolonoscopy abdominal pain. Colonoscopy is a common procedure used for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. Life-threatening complications are uncommon (28/10 000 procedures) but include perforation, hemorrhage, diverticulitis, and postpolypectomy syndrome. Although previously reported, the association between appendicitis and colonoscopy is not widely known. This case report highlights the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentation

2013 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

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