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Peripheral Arterial Disease 10-Year Mortality Index

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1. Changes in exercise capacity and risk of all-cause mortality in patients with peripheral artery disease: a 10-year retrospective cohort study. (PubMed)

Changes in exercise capacity and risk of all-cause mortality in patients with peripheral artery disease: a 10-year retrospective cohort study. We retrospectively studied the association between changes in exercise capacity at discharge from a home-based exercise program and the risk of all-cause mortality among patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and claudication. The records of 1076 consecutive PAD patients were assessed between 2003 and 2013. The exercise program was prescribed (...) during a few visits and executed at home at symptom-free walking speed. Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) and maximal speed (Smax) on an incremental treadmill test were recorded at baseline and discharge. The number and date of deaths and hospitalizations for a 10-year period were collected from the regional registry. A total of 865 PAD patients completed the program (completers), while 221 left the program for health reasons (n = 128, diseased) or for nonhealth reasons (n = 83, quitters). Among

2019 Internal and emergency medicine

2. Bilateral low systolic toe pressure and toe-brachial index are associated with long-term mortality in patients with peripheral artery disease. (PubMed)

Bilateral low systolic toe pressure and toe-brachial index are associated with long-term mortality in patients with peripheral artery disease. Based on our previous reports, ipsilateral systolic toe pressure (STP) and toe-brachial index (TBI) have a strong association with midterm cardiovascular and overall mortality as well as with amputation-free survival in patients with symptomatic lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). The effect of the often overlooked contralateral lower limb (...) and observed for up to 7 years. Dates and causes of death were collected from the national cause of death registry of Statistics Finland.In the study cohort, STP was <30 mm Hg in 67 contralateral limbs and 227 ipsilateral limbs. CL_STP <30 mm Hg resulted in a 60-month estimated freedom from cardiovascular death and overall survival of 39% (standard deviation [SD], 0.57) and 25% (SD, 0.41), respectively, and contralateral TBI <0.25, of 45% (SD, 0.54) and 36% (SD, 0.54), respectively. Cumulative freedom from

2019 Journal of Vascular Surgery

3. YKL-40 levels increase with declining ankle-brachial index and are associated with long-term cardiovascular mortality in peripheral arterial disease patients. (PubMed)

YKL-40 levels increase with declining ankle-brachial index and are associated with long-term cardiovascular mortality in peripheral arterial disease patients. YKL-40 is an inflammatory marker secreted by macrophages and is expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. YKL-40 increases in coronary artery disease (CAD) with poor coronary collateral vessel development. Higher levels are linked to reduced survival in CAD patients. Studies evaluating YKL-40 in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD (...) Moenckeberg's mediasclerosis (R = -0.189, p=0.002). PAD patients with mediasclerosis exhibited higher YKL-40 levels (p=0.002). Baseline YKL-40 levels were significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.52 (1.21-1.91), p < 0.001) and all-cause mortality (HR 1.45 (1.20-1.75), p < 0.001) over a seven-year observation period. After multivariable adjustment for gender, patient age, known carotid artery disease, known coronary artery disease, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c, low

2018 Atherosclerosis

4. The heart matters in diabetes: 10-Year outcomes of peripheral artery disease (Full text)

The heart matters in diabetes: 10-Year outcomes of peripheral artery disease Mortality rates at 10years are higher in diabetic patients with chronic lower extremity peripheral arterial disease than in non-diabetic peripheral arterial disease patients. We tested the hypothesis that the predictors of mortality differ between diabetic and non-diabetic peripheral arterial disease patients.We studied 331 consecutive patients who were <75 years of age, symptomatic for peripheral arterial disease (...) , and admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Our cohort included 216 patients without diabetes mellitus and 115 with diabetes mellitus. The outcome measure was all-cause mortality at 10years post-admission.Mortality rates at 10years were 29% among non-diabetic peripheral arterial disease patients and 58% among diabetic peripheral arterial disease patients. We identified the following independent predictors of death in the 216 peripheral arterial disease patients without diabetes: age ≥65 years (risk ratio

2017 SAGE open medicine PubMed

5. Optimal Exercise Programs for Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association (Full text)

Optimal Exercise Programs for Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Optimal Exercise Programs for Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 (...) , Originally published 13 Dec 2018 Circulation. 2018;139:e10–e33 Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a progressive atherosclerotic disease that affects >8 million Americans. Symptoms of PAD are caused by insufficient arterial blood flow to the lower extremities, which often results in ischemia-induced, debilitating leg discomfort associated with walking. Claudication, which is cramping, aching, or pain in the calves, thighs, or buttocks, is the classic symptom of PAD. Claudication is defined

2019 American Gastroenterological Association Institute PubMed

6. Morbidity and mortality associated with atherosclerotic peripheral artery disease: A systematic review. (PubMed)

Morbidity and mortality associated with atherosclerotic peripheral artery disease: A systematic review. It is unclear whether improvements in the detection/treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) affect overall survival and morbidity. We undertook a systematic review to describe survival and morbidity in contemporary PAD cohorts.Electronic databases were searched for randomised and observational studies reporting mortality/morbidity events between 1 May 2003 and 31 December, 2017 (...) in patients with PAD, diagnosed by intermittent claudication (IC), critical limb ischaemia (CLI), or an ankle brachial index (ABI) < 0.9. Pooled event rates for all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), non-fatal stroke, major CV events (MACE; non-fatal MI/stroke, CV death), and major amputation were calculated per 1000 person-years.124 eligible studies were identified (570,856 patients; 855,894 person-years of follow-up). Statin use was reported in 67

2019 Atherosclerosis

7. The Risk of Disease Progression in Peripheral Arterial Disease is Higher than Expected: A Meta-Analysis of Mortality and Disease Progression in Peripheral Arterial Disease. (Full text)

The Risk of Disease Progression in Peripheral Arterial Disease is Higher than Expected: A Meta-Analysis of Mortality and Disease Progression in Peripheral Arterial Disease. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) afflicts up to 20% of older people and is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity, but a rather low risk of progression of leg symptoms. These risk estimations are largely taken from cohort studies performed 20 years ago. To test the validity of this, available data were (...) systematically reviewed and attempts were made to perform meta-analyses of CV risk and disease progression.A database literature search was conducted of the period 1990-2015 using related subject headings. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies for PAD, sample size >100 subjects, follow up time ≥1 year, and studies presenting endpoints covering mortality and/or CV events. Analyses were performed for a reference population, as well as groups with asymptomatic PAD (APAD), symptomatic PAD, and subjects

2016 European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery PubMed

8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases (Full text)

with type 1 diabetes without other major risk factors); a calculated SCORE ≥5% and <10%. Table 3 The Ankle-Brachial Index AAA = abdominal aorta aneurysm; ABI = ankle-brachial index; BP = blood pressure; CAD = coronary artery disease; CKD = chronic kidney disease; CV = cardiovascular; ESC = European Society of Cardiology; LEAD = lower extremity artery disease; PADs = peripheral arterial diseases; SBP = systolic blood pressure. a Subjects with: markedly elevated single risk factors; diabetes mellitus (...) ) The Task Force for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS) Victor Aboyans Corresponding authors: Victor Aboyans, Department of Cardiology CHRU Dupuytren Limoges, 2 Avenue Martin Luther King, 87042 Limoges, France. Tel: +33 5 55 05 63 10, Fax: +335 55 05 63 34, Email: vaboyans@live.fr. Jean-Baptiste Ricco, Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital, rue de la Miletrie, 86021

2017 European Society of Cardiology PubMed

9. Data on association of ankle pressure and ankle brachial index of symptomatic and contralateral lower extremities with overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (Full text)

Data on association of ankle pressure and ankle brachial index of symptomatic and contralateral lower extremities with overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease Data on survival curves for overall survival and freedom from cardiovascular death at different ankle brachial index (ABI) and ankle pressure (AP) are shown separately for symptomatic and contralateral lower limbs in 721 patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease at up (...) to 7 years follow-up. Cox regression analysis with confounding factors for ABI and AP are also shown. Dates and causes of death were collected from the Finnish national statistics registry.

2018 Data in brief PubMed

10. Association of adiponectin with peripheral arterial disease and mortality in nondiabetic hemodialysis patients: Long-term follow-up data of 7 years (Full text)

Association of adiponectin with peripheral arterial disease and mortality in nondiabetic hemodialysis patients: Long-term follow-up data of 7 years The relationships between adiponectin and clinical outcomes in hemodialysis (HD) patients remain highly controversial. Meanwhile, the association between adiponectin and the peripheral artery disease (PAD) has not been well studied in HD patients without diabetic mellitus.The ankle-brachial index was measured in HD patients. Adiponectin levels (...) with a significant increase in the risk of PAD in HD patients without diabetic mellitus. Furthermore, as the results of our observation period (maximum of 7 years) showed, adiponectin was a predictor of all-cause mortality in HD patients.

2016 Journal of research in medical sciences : the official journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences PubMed

11. Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding

risks. The additional costs of prescribing rivaroxaban will need to be taken into account when assessing the population benefits. The trial was sponsored by Bayer AG. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Population studies show that about 20% of people aged over 60 years have peripheral arterial disease. About 10-15% of people who report symptoms, such as restrictions in the distance they can walk, will probably die of related cardiovascular causes over five years (...) and Care Excellence; 2012. Why was this study needed? Population studies show that about 20% of people aged over 60 years have peripheral arterial disease. About 10-15% of people who report symptoms, such as restrictions in the distance they can walk, will probably die of related cardiovascular causes over five years. This is three times as many as a comparable group of age and sex-matched controls. Treatment involves lifestyle changes, drugs and surgery to reduce this risk. A daily dose of aspirin

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

12. 2016 AHA/ACC Guideline on the Management of Patients With Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease

for the Management of Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease” 9 and the “2011 ACCF/AHA Focused Update of the Guideline for the Management of Patients With Pe- ripheral Artery Disease?” 10 The scope of this guideline is limited to atherosclerotic disease of the lower extrem- ity arteries (PAD) and includes disease of the aortoiliac, femoropopliteal, and infrapopliteal arterial segments? It does not address nonatherosclerotic causes of lower ex- tremity arterial disease, such as vasculitis, fibromuscular (...) ://ahajournals.org by on March 27, 2019Gerhard-Herman et al March 21, 2017 Circulation. 2017;135:e726–e779. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000471 e738 Figure 1. Diagnostic Testing for Suspected PAD. Colors correspond to Class of Recommendation in Table 1? ABI indicates ankle-brachial index; CLI, critical limb ischemia; CTA, computed tomography angiography; GDMT, guideline-directed management and therapy; MRA, magnetic resonance angiography; PAD, peripheral artery disease; and TBI, toe-brachial index? Autoimmune

2017 American Heart Association

13. Comparison of In-Hospital Outcomes After Percutaneous Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With a Body Mass Index of &gt;30 kg/m<sup>2</sup> Versus ≤30 kg/m<sup>2</sup> (from the National Inpatient Sample). (PubMed)

Comparison of In-Hospital Outcomes After Percutaneous Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With a Body Mass Index of >30 kg/m2 Versus ≤30 kg/m2 (from the National Inpatient Sample). Obesity is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality which may affect the outcomes of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). However, the exact role of obesity in patients with PAD who underwent percutaneous revascularization (...) or angioplasty in the lower extremities. Obesity was defined as a body mass index of >30 kg/m2. Patients below 18 years of age were excluded. A total of 62,445 (weighted 312,225) patients were identified. The mean age was higher in the nonobese group (64.2 vs 69.0 years, p ≤0.001). No difference existed in the primary outcome, in-hospital mortality, with the propensity score matched (1:10) analysis. Renal failure and the composite of complications were increased in obese patients. Percutaneous treatment

2017 American Journal of Cardiology

14. Frailty assessment in older adults undergoing interventions for peripheral arterial disease

Frailty assessment in older adults undergoing interventions for peripheral arterial disease Frailty is a multidimensional syndrome that influences postoperative morbidity and mortality after vascular procedures; however, its integration in clinical practice has been limited, given the lack of consensus on how to measure it. This study sought to compare the incremental predictive value of six different nonphysical performance frailty scales to predict poor outcomes after interventions (...) for peripheral arterial disease (PAD).This preplanned analysis of the FRailty Assessment In Lower Extremity arterial Disease (FRAILED) prospective cohort included two centers recruiting patients between July 1, 2015, and October 1, 2016. Individuals who underwent vascular interventions for Rutherford class 3 or higher PAD were enrolled. The following scales were compared: Edmonton Frail Scale, Groningen Frailty Indicator (GFI), modified Essential Frailty Toolset (mEFT), modified Frailty Index

2019 EvidenceUpdates

15. Risk Factors for Mortality Among Individuals With Peripheral Arterial Disease. (PubMed)

Risk Factors for Mortality Among Individuals With Peripheral Arterial Disease. Morbidity and mortality from peripheral arterial disease (PAD) continues to increase. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are implicated in the development of PAD, yet the extent to which those risk factors correlate with mortality in such patients remains insufficiently assessed. Using data from the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Cox proportional hazards models were used (...) to examine the association of cardiovascular risk factors and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. A total of 647 individuals ≥40 years old with PAD (i.e., ankle-brachial index [ABI] ≤ 0.9) were followed for a median of 7.8 years. There were 336 deaths, of which 98 were attributable to cardiovascular disease. Compared with never smokers, current (hazard ratio [HR] 2.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62 to 3.71) and former (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.29) smokers with PAD had higher rates of death

2017 American Journal of Cardiology

16. Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding

risks. The additional costs of prescribing rivaroxaban will need to be taken into account when assessing the population benefits. The trial was sponsored by Bayer AG. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Population studies show that about 20% of people aged over 60 years have peripheral arterial disease. About 10-15% of people who report symptoms, such as restrictions in the distance they can walk, will probably die of related cardiovascular causes over five years (...) and Care Excellence; 2012. Why was this study needed? Population studies show that about 20% of people aged over 60 years have peripheral arterial disease. About 10-15% of people who report symptoms, such as restrictions in the distance they can walk, will probably die of related cardiovascular causes over five years. This is three times as many as a comparable group of age and sex-matched controls. Treatment involves lifestyle changes, drugs and surgery to reduce this risk. A daily dose of aspirin

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

17. Position Statement on Noninvasive Imaging of Peripheral Arterial Disease by the Society of Interventional Radiology and the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association Clinical Practice Guidelines

. Benenati, MD, Michael D. Kuo, MD, Sean R. Dariushnia, MD, Salomao Faintuch, MD, Mehran Midia, MD, FRCPC, and Boris Nikolic, MD, MBA ABBREVIATIONS ABI=ankle-brachialindex, PAD=peripheralarterydisease,PSV=peaksystolicvelocity,PVR=pulsevolumerecording, TBI=toe brachial index INTRODUCTION Noninvasive evaluation of peripheral artery disease (PAD) has de?ned usefulness for patient screening and patient strati?cation. In addition, this evaluation also facilitates proper patient selection and objective outcome (...) laboratories (17,18). Table 1. ABI-Based Grading of PAD ABI Comment 4 1.3 Falsely high value (suspicion of medal sclerosis) 0.9–1.3 Normal ?nding 0.75–0.9 Mild PAD 0.4–0.75 Moderate PAD o 0.4 Severe PAD Source–Stiegler H, Brandl R. Importance of ultrasound for diagnosing peripheral artery disease. Ultraschall in Med 2009; 30:334–363. ABI¼ ankle brachial index; PAD¼ peripheral artery disease. Dhanoa et al ’ JVIR 948’ SIR/CIRA Position Statement on Noninvasive PAD ImagingRecommendations. PVRs are ideal

2016 Society of Interventional Radiology

18. Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) predicts 2-year mortality risk among older adults in the Republic of Congo: The EPIDEMCA-FU study. (PubMed)

Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) predicts 2-year mortality risk among older adults in the Republic of Congo: The EPIDEMCA-FU study. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is known to be associated with mortality in high income countries but no data regarding Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) populations are documented. This study aimed at assessing the prognostic value of the Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) among older adults in the Republic of Congo.Congolese subjects ≥65 years were included in a longitudinal population (...) an ABI≤0.90. During a 2-year follow-up, a total of 83 (9.1%) deaths were recorded. Mortality was higher in the low-ABI group with 23 deaths (14.7%) vs. 57 (7.8%) and 3 (12.0%), respectively among those with 0.90 < ABI<1.4 and ABI≥1.40 (p = 0.039). After adjustment, an ABI≤0.90 was associated with an increased risk of mortality (HR = 1.86; 95%CI 1.04-3.87). Mortality was also independently associated with increasing age (HR = 1.05; 95%CI 1.02-1.09), dementia (HR = 2.73; 95% CI 1.15-8.05), alcohol use

2019 Atherosclerosis

19. Incidence, Characteristics, and Outcomes of Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: Insights From the EUCLID Trial. (PubMed)

Incidence, Characteristics, and Outcomes of Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: Insights From the EUCLID Trial. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) are at high risk for myocardial infarction (MI).To characterize the incidence and types of MI in a PAD population, identify factors associated with MI, and determine the association of MI with cardiovascular mortality and acute limb ischemia.The Study Comparing Cardiovascular Effects of Ticagrelor (...) and Clopidogrel in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease (EUCLID) was a double-blind randomized clinical trial conducted at 811 sites in 28 countries that randomized 13 885 patients with symptomatic PAD to monotherapy with ticagrelor or clopidogrel. Participants had an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.80 or less or previous lower extremity revascularization. Median follow-up was 30 months. For these analyses, patients were evaluated for MI occurrence during follow-up irrespective of treatment. Data were

2018 JAMA cardiology

20. ACC/AHA/SCAI/SIR/SVM 2018 Appropriate Use Criteria for Peripheral Artery Intervention: a report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

. 221 Section 5 Assumptions: Options for Endovascular Treatment When Deemed Appropriate or May Be Appropriate 221 Section 6 Assumptions: Secondary Treatment Options for Lower Extremity Disease 221 4.DEFINITIONS ... .. 221 Table 1: Classi?cation Comparison for Chronic Limb Ischemia . 223 5.ABBREVIATIONS .. 223 6.PERIPHERAL ARTERY INTERVENTION APPROPRIATE USE CRITERIA (BY INDICATION) . 223 Section 1 Renal Artery Stenosis.. 223 Table 1.1 Chronic Kidney Disease . 223 Table 1.2 Hypertension .. 223 Table (...) Iliac Artery ... 226 Table 5.2 Isolated External Iliac Artery. ... 226 Table 5.3 Diffuse Common Iliac Artery and External Iliac Artery .. ... 226 Table 5.4 SFA and Popliteal Artery ... 227 Table 5.5 Below the Knee ... 227 Section 5 Results and Discussion ... 227 Section 6 Secondary Treatment Options for Lower-Extremity Disease... 227 Table 6.1 In-Stent Restenosis . ... 227 JACC VOL. 73, NO. 2, 2019 Bailey et al. JANUARY 22, 2019:214–37 2018 AUC for Peripheral Artery Intervention 215Table 6.2 Venous

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

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