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Periodic Limb Movement

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3141. Early effects of embryonic movement: ‘a shot out of the dark’ Full Text available with Trip Pro

by developing novel models and schemes to examine the influence of defined periods of movement during musculoskeletal development. Utilizing drugs with known neuromuscular actions to provoke hyperactivity (4-aminopyridine, AP) and either rigid (decamethonium bromide, DMB) or flaccid (pancuronium bromide, PB) paralysis, we have examined the role of movement in joint, osteochondral and muscle development. Our initial studies focusing on the joint showed that AP-induced hyperactivity had little, if any, effect (...) , with different developmental periods preferentially modifying specific osteochondral components. Changes in cartilage and bone growth induced by 3-day periods of flaccid immobilization, imposed at distinct developmental phases, provides support for a diminution in cartilage elaboration at an early phase and for a relatively delayed influence of movement on osteogenesis, invoking critical periods during which the developing skeleton becomes receptive to the impact of movement. Immobilization also exerts

2006 Journal of anatomy

3142. Angle stable locking reduces interfragmentary movements and promotes healing after unreamed nailing. Study of a displaced osteotomy model in sheep tibiae. (Abstract)

. Each pair of tibiae was also mechanically tested until torsional failure, after which the whole callus region was subjected to histological and histomorphometric analysis.Throughout the examination period, the interfragmentary movements in all directions were significantly smaller in the group treated with the angle stable tibial nail than they were in the group treated with standard unreamed tibial nailing. The limbs treated with the angle stable tibial nails returned to almost full weight-bearing (...) during the period of the investigation, whereas those treated with standard nailing did not. Histomorphometric analysis, radiographic data, and mechanical testing showed superior bone-healing following treatment with the angle stable tibial nail.Use of an angle stable tibial nail may help to reduce interfragmentary movements in vivo and thus lead to superior bone-healing compared with that following standard unreamed tibial nailing.

2005 The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume

3143. Measurement of pruritus in a Chinese woman with pemphigoid gestationis using a wrist movement detector. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Measurement of pruritus in a Chinese woman with pemphigoid gestationis using a wrist movement detector. Pemphigoid gestationis (PG) is a rare itching bullous disease of pregnancy and the postpartum period. We describe the use of a new methodology for measuring the nature and intensity of itching in a 21-year-old woman with pemphigoid gestationis. At 19 weeks gestation, she developed an itchy rash over the limbs, which spread to the trunk. Blisters then appeared on the hands which subsequently (...) also involved the feet. Intense nocturnal wrist activities in this patient, measured with a wrist monitor and defined as average acceleration in the early hours of sleep, were even higher than that in patients with severe eczema, with an average value of 181.00 +/- 43.49 (mean +/- standard error) g/min for the first three hours, versus 84.47 +/- 8.53 g/min for the group of 24 eczema subjects. Most wrist activities were slower movements at 0 to 1 Hz. This is in striking contrast to the scratching

2008 International Journal of Dermatology

3144. Movement disorders associated with complex regional pain syndrome in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Movement disorders associated with complex regional pain syndrome in children. The aim of the present study was to review the history, clinical course, treatment, and outcome of movement disorders in children and young people with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Case notes were reviewed retrospectively of children and young people who presented with movement disorders in CRPS to our tertiary paediatric pain service over a period of 13 years. Ten children with CRPS presented with movement (...) disorders (eight females, two males). The age at first presentation with symptoms of CRPS ranged from 8 to 15 years (mean 11 y 2 mo, median 13 y). The most common movement disorder was dystonia (n=8), followed by tremors (n=3) and myoclonus (n=3); two patients had all three movement disorders. The movement disorder affected mainly the lower limb (n=9) with a predilection for the foot (n=7) and was frequently initiated by minor trauma (n=7). Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 14 years. The outcome

2008 Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

3145. The distinctive movement disorder of ovarian teratoma-associated encephalitis. (Abstract)

The distinctive movement disorder of ovarian teratoma-associated encephalitis. The movement disorder observed in four cases of ovarian teratoma associated encephalitis is described. The illness began with neuropsychiatric symptoms and was followed by prolonged unresponsiveness, respiratory failure, and autonomic instability. The movement disorder consisted of semirhythmic repetitive bulbar and limb movements and persisted during prolonged periods of unresponsiveness, diminishing as awareness (...) returned. The characteristics of the movement disorder differed from recognized dyskinesias. It is suggested that interruption of forebrain corticostriatal inputs by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibodies removes tonic inhibition of brainstem pattern generators releasing primitive patterns of bulbar and limb movement. Recognition of the distinctive movements should prompt a search for an ovarian teratoma since the condition is responsive to tumor resection and immunomodulation.(c) 2008

2008 Movement Disorders

3146. EFNS guidelines on management of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in sleep Full Text available with Trip Pro

EFNS guidelines on management of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in sleep EFNS guidelines on management of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in sleep EFNS guidelines on management of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in sleep Vignatelli L, Billiard M, Clarenbach P, Garcia-Borreguero D, Kaynak D, Liesiene V, Trenkwalder C, Montagna P CRD summary The authors concluded that level A recommendations support the use (...) of cabergoline, gabapentin, pergolide, ropinirole, and short-term levodopa and transdermal rotigotine for primary restless leg syndrome. The evidence appears to support the authors’ conclusions, but the poor reporting of review methods makes it difficult to comment on the reliability of these conclusions. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of treatments for restless leg syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) in sleep. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane

2006 DARE.

3147. Abnormal Involuntary Movements

, hands, toes and feet. The arms, legs, neck and tongue may also be affected. Causes include asphyxia, neonatal jaundice, Huntington's chorea, cerebrovascular disease and trauma. Management can be difficult but treatment options include medications (eg, diazepam, haloperidol, tetrabenazine), surgery and retraining techniques. Chorea Continuous jerky movements in which each movement is sudden and the resulting posture is held for a few seconds. This usually affects the head, face or limbs. The focus (...) . [ ] There are three types of pathological tremor: Static - occurs in a relaxed limb when fully supported at rest. Causes include Parkinson's disease, Parkinsonism, other extrapyramidal diseases, multiple sclerosis. Postural - occurs if a limb is static (can also remain during movement). Types include physiological tremor, exaggerated physiological tremor - eg, in thyrotoxicosis, anxiety states, alcohol abuse, drugs (eg, sympathomimetics, antidepressants, valproate, lithium), heavy metal poisoning ('hatter's

2008 Mentor

3148. A comparison of patient-controlled analgesia administered by the intravenous or intranasal route during the early postoperative period. (Abstract)

trial designed to compare the effectiveness of diamorphine administered as PCA utilising either the intranasal or intravenous routes. We investigated 52 consecutive patients undergoing primary lower limb joint replacement surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to receive PCA diamorphine, administered either intravenously (0.5 mg bolus, 3 min lockout) or intranasally (1.0 mg bolus, 3 min lockout). Pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Score (VAS) at rest and on movement on five occasions over (...) A comparison of patient-controlled analgesia administered by the intravenous or intranasal route during the early postoperative period. Intranasal administration of lipophilic opioids has been shown to be an effective method of administration which is devoid of major side-effects. Whether it is as effective as intravenous administration for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) has been investigated for fentanyl and pethidine, but not for diamorphine. This study reports a randomised controlled

2002 Anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3149. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study to compare the efficacy and safety of three doses of botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) with placebo in upper limb spasticity after stroke. (Abstract)

on functional disability was not statistically significant and was best at a dose of 1000 U. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of adverse events.The present study suggests that treatment with Dysport reduces muscle tone in patients with poststroke upper limb spasticity. Treatment was effective at doses of Dysport of 500, 1000, and 1500 U. The optimal dose for treatment of patients with residual voluntary movements in the upper limb appears to be 1000 U (...) A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study to compare the efficacy and safety of three doses of botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) with placebo in upper limb spasticity after stroke. We sought to define an effective and safe dose of botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) for the treatment of upper limb muscle spasticity due to stroke.This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study. Patients received either a placebo or 1 of 3 doses

2000 Stroke Controlled trial quality: predicted high

3150. Functional outcome of botulinum toxin A injections to the lower limbs in cerebral palsy. (Abstract)

. At the end of this period, group 2 received BTX-A and physiotherapy and group 1 continued with physiotherapy alone. Assessment measures were the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Vulpe Assessment Battery (VAB), joint range of movement, the Modified Ashworth Scale, and a parental questionnaire. Sustained gains in gross motor function were found in both groups of children but the only additional benefit found in group 1 was a significant increase in fine motor rating on the VAB. By contrast, parents (...) Functional outcome of botulinum toxin A injections to the lower limbs in cerebral palsy. We evaluated gross motor function following botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in the lower limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy in a randomized clinical trial, using a cross-over design. Forty-nine children (24 males, 25 females, age range 22 to 80 months) were randomly allocated to two groups: group 1 received BTX-A and physiotherapy, and group 2 received physiotherapy alone for 6 months

2002 Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3151. Intensive, time-series measurement of upper limb recovery in the subacute phase following stroke. (Abstract)

Intensive, time-series measurement of upper limb recovery in the subacute phase following stroke. To discover if intensive monitoring of wrist extension would produce consistent recovery curves during the subacute period, and whether any impact of additional physiotherapy could be detected. We also investigated improved approaches to statistical analysis in single-case experiments.A randomized multiple-baseline experiment with very frequent assessment.Stroke rehabilitation unit.Four patients (...) with some active wrist movement less than seven weeks after stroke.Wrist extension was measured twice daily with an electrogoniometer for 3-4 weeks. Additional upper limb physiotherapy 115 minutes, twice per day) commenced after a randomly determined period.Speed and range of wrist movement.A logarithmic function was fitted to the data to produce recovery curves. In all cases, active range and maximum velocity of wrist extension rose gradually over time. Mean variability in range was <5

2003 Clinical rehabilitation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3152. The development of the segmental pattern of skin sensory innervation in embryonic chick hind limb Full Text available with Trip Pro

The development of the segmental pattern of skin sensory innervation in embryonic chick hind limb 1. The development of dermatomes in the chick hind limb was investigated with both electrophysiological recording from and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labelling of neurones in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (d.r.g.s). The embryonic stages studied spanned the period before and after cell death.2. In mature embryos, after the bulk of cell death, physiological mapping showed that the location (...) on the limb during the stages studied.6. Together these findings show that dermatomes on the chick hind limb do not develop by skin sensory axons simply growing to the nearest available skin, nor are axons towed to their final location by skin movements. Moreover, dermatomes are not shaped by cell death and the elimination of random or excessive axonal projections in the limb or the skin. It appears that skin sensory axons from each d.r.g. grow directly to their target skin along a defined set of pathways

1982 The Journal of physiology

3153. Activation patterns of embryonic chick hind limb muscles recorded in ovo and in an isolated spinal cord preparation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Activation patterns of embryonic chick hind limb muscles recorded in ovo and in an isolated spinal cord preparation. Muscle activation patterns of embryonic chick hind limb muscles were determined from electromyographic (e.m.g.) recordings in an isolated spinal cord/hind limb preparation of stage 34-36 embryos, and were compared with in ovo e.m.g. activity from similarly staged embryos. Muscle activity in ovo consisted of periodically recurring sequences of bursts during which antagonistic (...) muscles often alternated and synergistic muscles were co-active, as compatible with their mature function. However, more variable behaviour was also observed. Burst sequences in ovo were often initiated by a short-duration, high-amplitude discharge that occurred synchronously in all muscles studied, and which was followed by a period of electrical silence that was longest in the flexor muscles. This type of activity has not been described previously in mature animals. In ovo movement sequences were

1984 The Journal of physiology

3154. Limb-kinetic apraxia in corticobasal degeneration: clinical and kinematic features. (Abstract)

and cortical inhibition. All five patients in the apraxic group exhibited a unilateral praxic deficit characterised by derangement of fractionated and segmental finger movements. QMC was significantly greater in apraxic than in nonapraxic patients (P < 0.02), revealing a chaotic movement with marked interfinger uncoordination. Conventional transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters were within normal limits in both groups of patients; however, the silent period was significantly shorter in the apraxic (...) limb when compared with control subjects (P < 0.001). Limb-kinetic apraxia is a distinctive disorder affecting the performance of finger and hand postures and movements over and above a corticospinal or basal ganglion deficit. Disruption of the frontoparietal circuit devoted to grasping and manipulation, together with defective cortical inhibition, which would also interfere with the selection and control of hand muscle activity, are the most likely underlying physiopathological mechanisms of limb

2003 Movement Disorders

3155. Treatment for Movement Problems in Elderly Stroke Patients

the more affected upper limb. This gives rise to massed or concentrated repetitive use of the more affected extremity. CI therapy leads to a large increase in use-dependent cortical reorganization involving the recruitment of other regions of the brain in the innervation of the more affected extremity movement. One of the main aims of the proposed research is to determine if CI therapy can be used with therapeutic success for increasing the amount of real-world extremity use in patients with chronic (...) Treatment for Movement Problems in Elderly Stroke Patients Treatment for Movement Problems in Elderly Stroke Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Treatment for Movement Problems

2003 Clinical Trials

3156. Automated Constraint-Induced Therapy for Restoring Movement After Stroke

Automated Constraint-Induced Therapy for Restoring Movement After Stroke Automated Constraint-Induced Therapy for Restoring Movement After Stroke - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Automated (...) Constraint-Induced Therapy for Restoring Movement After Stroke The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00037960 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : May 27, 2002 Last Update Posted : January 21, 2009 Sponsor: US Department of Veterans Affairs Information provided by: VA Office of Research

2002 Clinical Trials

3157. Neurophysiological Studies in Patients With Paroxysmal Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

younger than 8 years old. B. Patients with attacks that involve head and neck movements, axial movements, bilateral limb involvement, or violent attacks that typically make patients fall to the ground. With respect to children, violent attacks are defined as any attack that can potentially result in injury (hitting the head, falls, violent flailing, hitting furniture or walls) C. Previous history of or MRI findings consistent with brain tumors, strokes, trauma or arterial venous malformations. D (...) Neurophysiological Studies in Patients With Paroxysmal Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders Neurophysiological Studies in Patients With Paroxysmal Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies

2003 Clinical Trials

3158. Effect of pergolide on restless legs and leg movements in sleep in uremic patients. (Abstract)

Effect of pergolide on restless legs and leg movements in sleep in uremic patients. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) are disorders that are common and disturbing to uremic patients. The treatment of these is problematic. Eight patients on chronic hemodialysis and continuous peritoneal dialysis completed a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study using incremental doses of pergolide up to 0.25 mg at bedtime for treatment of RLS and sleep disruption (...) . Five patients (62.5%) noted subjective improvement in restless legs symptoms and sleep quality. Objective results were improved only slightly by treatment. The percentage of the first hour in bed during which leg movements occurred decreased from 20.5 +/- 6.0 to 11.5 +/- 3.3, p < 0.05. However, findings during sleep were less positive. The following measures were not significant between placebo and treatment: leg movements per hour of sleep [53.7 +/- 22.3 vs 35.8 +/- 11.8 (p = 0.2)]; and percentage

1998 Sleep

3159. L-DOPA/carbidopa for nocturnal movement disorders in uremia. (Abstract)

L-DOPA/carbidopa for nocturnal movement disorders in uremia. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) are sleep disorders that are common and distressing to uremic patients. There are few data regarding effective treatment in this population. Five chronic hemodialysis patients completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study using a single bedtime dose of controlled release L-DOPA/carbidopa (100/25 mg) for treatment of RLS and sleep disruption (...) on placebo, mean 23 +/- 9 events/hour on drug) were decreased by active medication (p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Patients, however, continued to have very disrupted sleep and we could not document consistent subjective or objective improvement in overall sleep except for an increase in slow-wave sleep (SWS) from 9.0% to 22.8% (p = 0.01). The patterns of movements during sleep were not uniform in different patients, and the movements, although often periodic, were much longer than defined for PLMS

1996 Sleep Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3160. Training improves the speed of aimed movements in Parkinson's disease. (Abstract)

, without any deterioration in accuracy. These effects transferred to an untrained limb and were at least partially maintained after a 1-h delay. While patients remained impaired relative to control subjects at all phases of training and follow-up, the patients' performance at the end of training did not differ significantly from the control subjects' baseline function. Contrary to expectation, rhythmic auditory cues did not enhance improvement in the speed of aimed movements in either patients (...) or control subjects. If anything, less improvement was shown in the cued groups, although there were suggestions that the aiming skill was retained better over the delay period. The results demonstrate preserved abilities to improve speed of single ballistic aiming movements in Parkinson's disease patients and the possibility of reducing bradykinesia by training.

1998 Brain Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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